THE BLOG

Can Writing Be a Sociable Activity?

22/04/2015 12:30 BST | Updated 20/06/2015 10:59 BST

Two weeks from now, I will be a full-time author.

Becoming an author has been a long-held dream of mine. To be more specific, it became my lifetime ambition once I had realised that I wasn't any good at football and couldn't see well enough to drive trains.

From May onwards, I will spend my days pecking mercilessly at my laptop keyboard, concocting the masterpiece that will be my second novel.

When I told my mother that I was giving up my well paid job to write for a living, she nearly choked on her cornflakes. 'But you've only sold 27 copies of your first book,' she spluttered.

How very dare she.

Once I had corrected her on the numbers and told her about the rave reviews my debut novel, Six Months to Get a Life, was receiving, she still wasn't pacified.

'It's not just about the money,' she came back with, 'you'll go mad sitting on your own, writing all day.'

My mum has a point there. I love being with people. Sharing experiences, sharing views, sharing stories and sharing pizza is, for me, what makes me tick. I am a sociable person.

I can't wait to be a full-time author, but the solitude of a writing life does worry me. And being a single dad doesn't help with the potential loneliness either. Will I spend all day writing, and all evening cooking, washing and supervising homework, with no adult company other than my friends at the supermarket checkout to keep me sane?

Obviously, I am determined that the answer will be 'No.'

Over the past few weeks, I have looked in to a whole variety of ways of keeping myself sane while I write. It's not as though I want to chat all day, but having the odd conversation with an adult every so often would be nice, even if I don't get to share their pizza.

Being sociable online during breaks in my writing is one way I will reduce the feeling of isolation. I do enjoy engaging with fellow authors on forums such as that run by the Alliance of Independent Authors (ALLi), and with my growing reader-base on Facebook and Twitter. No doubt a bit of twitter banter during the day will spur me on.

But online sociability is no substitute for actual vocal chord-exercising conversation.

So how will I meet 'real people' during my writing day?

My dog, Albus, will demand that I take him for a walk at least once during the day. Last week, he brought a rugby ball in from the garden and deposited it on my keyboard just as I was getting to the climax of a tense scene. Walking the dog normally results in at least some interaction with real people. But saying things like 'Sorry my German Shepherd ate your Labradoodle' or 'he'll leave you alone in a minute,' isn't necessarily the sort of interaction that will make me feel good about my life. I'll need more than a dog walk a day to improve my sense of wellbeing as an author.

A number of my friends work from home. There's Pete the musician. I might need headphones for most of the day but I can cope with that. Or there's Barry the civil servant. He watches the cricket, I mean works from home, regularly. There's even Ed, my politician friend. He'd be good company but his talk of long-term economic plans, austerity and 'hard-working British people' might get a bit monotonous after a while. The one advantage of Ed is that he won't grill me on where the money's coming from to fund my lifestyle.

I am not sure whether Stephen King would approve, but so many authors have talked about establishing a routine in which they regularly write in a local coffee shop. JK Rowling apparently started writing Harry Potter in the coffee shop pictured above.

Whether or not such authors form a relationship with the proprietor or with fellow customers, this sounds like an idea worth exploring to me. The caffeine will certainly stimulate my creative juices, as might the comings and goings in the café. 'Cheeky Monkeys' on Grand Drive, you can expect a visit from me in May.

I am also intending to join a writing group. Until recently, I hadn't realised that writers gathered together just to write. But a bit of internet research tells me that they do.

Groups like the London-based 'Write Together' organise sessions for authors to gather together, work on their own writing projects for a few hours and then socialise, should they so wish. 'Write Together' advertise the get-togethers to their members via www.meetup.com. Meetings take place in a variety of venues, from cafes to coffee shops. Meeting likeminded authors would be a tonic for me, and I can see how being surrounded by fellow authors would spur you on to work harder. It may also piss me off if my fellow scribblers all seem to be typing more than me though.

If you have other ideas on how I might write in company, I would love to hear from you.

Ben Adams is the author of Six Months to Get a Life, the not autobiographical at all tale of a man coming to terms with life after divorce.