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For Mum Bloggers, The Riots Just Got Personal

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MUMS RIOTS
AP

Bewilderment. Fear. And most of all, anger.

As London erupts into flames and looting, mum bloggers - one of the UK's largest blogging tribes - are demonstrating how parenthood is colouring their personal response to the biggest news in the UK.

Even as many remain relatively insulated from the mayhem, these parents feel a visceral response to the danger. They may live in a part of London where they listened to owls hooting rather than glass shattering overnight, or they may live just down the road from the looted Clapham department store. But their response is strong and immediate. It can be characterised simply:

What is happening in the country my child is growing up in?

"Kids these days" is a clichéd phrase, associated with stuffy old codgers who can't stand rap music. But many people are deeply troubled about what "kids these days" are doing. (The fact that these may not be political rioters but gangs intent simply on creating chaos and looting a few shops while they're at it is a whole other story.)

As Emma from Me, The Man & The Baby, writes: "I am 22 years of age, most likely the same age of many of these yobs. My thoughts are about my family's and friends' safety; their thoughts are about what shops they can go looting from and what building they can burn down next."

In other words, my child will be growing up among these 'kids these days' and I don't like it.

Perfectly Happy Mum writes: "This furniture shop in Croydon, established here since 1867, not only has left 15 people unemployed this morning but with burning down has also seen a whole family history go down..."

People are angry. Not just the rioters, but the families who live their lives in London.

"This is my country, my capital. This is my children I have to think about," writes Ghostwritermummy.

"Last night, children in London slept with pillows over their ears and fear in their hearts and for what? What kind of protest is this now?"