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7 Reasons Why Nigel Farage's Response To The London Attack Is Verging On Ridiculous

What happens when you combine Farage with Fox News.

23/03/2017 17:12

Nigel Farage has busied himself by becoming Fox News’ go-to shock-jock and resident Briton in the aftermath of Wednesday’s terror attack in Westminster.

The ex-Ukip leader has appeared several times on the network since four people were killed yesterday, drawing strong criticism for his divisive punditry.

Here are six things he’s said so far that are provably wrong or verging on the ridiculous: 

1.

“I remember about five years ago I said that ... it was the first time in our history that we had people living amongst us, that wanted to destroy our values, and actually even wanted to kill us.”

As most people know, Britain has a history of people living within it who wanted to rock the country and even kill its leaders.

Most notably, the Irish Republican Army (IRA).

Britain endured over 100 attacks from paramilitary separatists on targets deliberately designed to attack the country’s institutions: John Lewis, Harrods, the Brighton hotel where Margaret Thatcher and her cabinet were staying.

2. 

“What the politicians have done to our country over the last 15 years may affect the way we live for the next 100 years.”

Farage was discussing immigration policy in this segment, recorded at around 2am on Thursday morning, some eight hours before Theresa May confirmed the attacker, Khalid Masood, 52, was born in Kent.

The bombers behind the horrific 7/7 attack in 2005 were also born in Britain.

Any greater immigration controls or checking would not have stopped the assailant being able to carry out an attack.

3.

The Trump travel ban, which temporarily stops people from six majority-Muslim countries entering the US, was lauded by Farage in the aftermath of the Westminster attacks.

But, again, a travel ban would have no effect in helping stop a homegrown terrorist carrying out an attack.

 4.

Farage called for our politicians to apologise for the attack, but after coming under attack on Wednesday, Theresa May did nothing of the sort, telling the Commons in a moving address that this was no time for divisiveness.

“Yesterday an act of terrorism tried to silence our democracy, but today we meet as normal, as generations have done before us and as future generations will continue to do, to deliver a simple message - we are not afraid and our resolve will never waver in the face of terrorism.

“Those values, free speech, liberty, human rights and the rule of law are embodied here in this place but they are shared by free people around the world. A terrorist came to the place where people of all nationalities and cultures gather to celebrate what it means to be free.

“This was an attack on free people everywhere. On behalf of the British people I would like to thank our friends and allies around the world who have made it clear they stand with us at this time.”

 5.

“It really started with Tony Blair in 1997, who said he wanted to build a multicultural Britain. His government said later they sent out search parties to find immigrants from all over the world to come into Britain - and do you know what? I don’t think we’ve vetted a single one of them.”

As part of his assault on politicians’ attitude to immigration, Farage claims Tony Blair’s government of 10 years failed to “vet” a single immigrant.

The ‘Immigration and Nationality Directorate’ (eventually replaced by the UK Border Agency) would probably have something to say about that.

6. 

“The police and the authorities need to stop turning a blind eye… We’ve go to root out the problems that already exist within our country and be incredibly strict about who our newcomers are.”

In an odd turn after a policeman was killed by the terrorist who attacked Parliament yesterday, Farage decided to turn his criticism on our emergency services.

He accused the police of “fearing” being called racist and cited the grooming scandal in Rotherham as proof.

7.

“The idea that this whole country tonight is united, which is what we’re hearing from our leaders, I’m not sure is true.”

As The Huffington Post UK has been highlighting, there are many examples of how the country is rallying together today.

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