POLITICS

Commons People Politics Podcast: Ken Livingstone, Labour's Anti-Semitism Problem And Child Refugees

All you need to know about the week's politics.

28/04/2016 17:55

Labour today suspended former London Mayor Ken Livingstone from the party after he claimed Hitler was initially a Zionist.

Livingstone made the comments as he waded into the row over whether Labour MP Naz Shah should have been suspended for social media activity dubbed anti-semitic before she was elected last May.

Shah, who defeated George Galloway in Bradford West last year, shared a post on Facebook called “Solution for Israel-Palestine Conflict - Relocate Israel into United States”, with the comment “problem solved”.

She also shared another post using the hashtag #IsraelApartheid above a quote saying “Never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal”.

Initially the decision was taken not to suspend her, and she gave an apology in the Commons yesterday afternoon.

However, after the apology, she was suspended by Labour while an investigation was carried out.

Today former London Mayor Ken Livingstone claimed the posts were not anti-Semitic, and Hitler was a Zionist before “before he went mad and ended up killing six million Jews.”

Fellow MP John Mann called him a 'Nazi apologist' and this afternoon Livingstone was suspended.

In an interview with Commons People, Labour MP Wes Streeting said it is "totally unacceptable and unsatisfactory" that Corbyn has refused to set a date for a promised meeting with Labour MPs to discuss tackling anti-Semitism.

Earlier this week, plans to bring unaccompanied refugee children already in Europe to the UK were defeated in the Commons.

The Government believes children should be taken from refugee camps in the Middle East, as those already in Europe are in safe countries already.

But not all share that view, Labour’s Yvette Cooper earned applause in PMQs yesterday as she urged David Cameron to change his position.

In what was a busy political week, it’s easy to forget that one of the most momentous strikes in NHS history took place on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Around 35,000 junior doctors – about 78% of the total number – failed to turn up for work between 8am and 5pm on tueday and Wednesday

The doctors are opposed to a new contract imposed by health secretary Jeremy hunt, which they argue will undermine patient safety by asking them to work longer hours without breaks, and will see them paid less for Saturday work.

The Government believe the new contract is needed to create a truly seven day NHS.

 

 

 

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