STYLE

Fashion Revolution 'Who Made Your Clothes' Campaign Reveals Fashion Brands With Supply Chain Transparency

Some of these high street shops might surprise you.

06/09/2016 16:52
sustainable fashion

The list of clothing brands who responded to Fashion Revolution’s #whomadeyourclothes campaign has been revealed.

Back in April, the sustainable fashion organisation called on the public to question their favourite companies about their supply chain transparency. Over 70,000 people took part on social media.

In total, 1251 brands responded to requests, including 372 mainstream brands including American Apparel, Massimo Dutti, Warehouse and Zara.

Over the course of the past year, Fashion Revolution heard from over 2,600 producers, garment workers and makers, who used Instagram and Twitter to share their stories. 

Back in April, Fashion Revolution also released the first edition of their Fashion Transparency Index, which scored 40 of the biggest global fashion brands according to what information they publicly disclose about social and environmental issues across their supply chains.

It found that, of these 40 companies, only five brands actually publish a list of the factories where their garments are sewn.

A photo posted by Rock + Pillar (@rockpillar) on

Fashion Revolution also works with policymakers in the UK parliament and European Commission to look at ways governments can support more transparency from the fashion industry.

This September The Huffington Post UK Style is focusing on all things sustainable, for the second year running. Our thirst for fast fashion is dramatically impacting the environment and the lives of thousands of workers in a negative way. Our aim is to raise awareness of this zeitgeist issue and champion brands and people working to make the fashion industry a more ethical place.

We’ll be sharing stories and blogs with the hashtag #SustainableFashion and we’d like you to do the same. If you’d like to use our blogging platform to share your story, email ukblogteam@huffingtonpost.com.

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