NEWS

Frankie Boyle Compares Boris Johnson To Fascist Oswald Mosley In Latest Brexit Column

'He's more like Oswald Moseley's soul trapped in a Furby.'

06/03/2017 13:06

Comedian and political commentator Frankie Boyle’s withering column about the Tory government’s Brexit strategy has bestowed Boris Johnson with an intensely sinister new persona.

Within Boyle’s dystopian view of the future, the Foreign Secretary is comparable to the essence of 1930s fascist leader Oswald Moseley, trapped in the form of a soft toy.

“Boris’s actual purpose? He’s just there to divert us from the horrific things the government is planning, like a nodding dog stuck to a serial killer’s dashboard. The media has a lot to answer for in terms of promoting the image that Boris is sweet and cuddly, when in fact he’s more like Oswald Mosley’s soul trapped in a Furby.”  

Djordje Kojadinovic / Reuters
Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson 

Johnson, who has previously been dismissed by Boyle as a “pissed-up dandelion” and “looking like a Harry Potter spell that’s brought all the hair in Dumbledore’s plughole to life”, is currently claiming he will divert a second Cold War with Russia.

Last month Johnson leapt to the defence of American President Donald Trump after veteran left-wing MP Dennis Skinner compared him with Hitler and Mussolini, accusing the Government of being “hand in hand with another fascist – Trump.”

Johnson, who was updating MPs on Trump’s immigration policy, said such comparisons between the President and the “tyrants of the 1930s” were “inappropriate.”

Fox Photos via Getty Images
Fascist leader Oswald Mosley addressing a rally in Hyde Park in 1934

Boyle also takes aim at Jeremy Corbyn’s rock-bottom popularity ratings, musing: “It must be depressing being [him]… Knowing that your chance of becoming Prime Minister is so slim even the MI6 group working on how to discretely bump you off have packed it in.”

Of the Labour leader’s now familiar hang-dog expression, he added: “He has the defeated look of someone whose tried and failed to talk a friend into leaving Mama Mia during the interval.”

PA
Frankie Boyle 

Last month, Boyle accused the newspaper of rejecting his writing for a second time because of his unfavourable comments about Rupert Murdoch.

In July Boyle claimed to have had another column pulled from The Guardian because of a single word, on the grounds of taste.

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