POLITICS

Jeremy Corbyn Reveals Which Countries' Economic Systems He Admires Most

21/11/2016 18:45
PAUL ELLIS via Getty Images
Jeremy Corbyn hailed Latin America and Scandinavia at his CBI address

Jeremy Corbyn today revealed which countries’ economic systems would be his greatest inspiration for a Labour government in Britain. 

The Labour leader was questioned on the topic by businessman Phil Williams at the CBI conference.

Williams asked which country Corbyn most admired that would give employers an idea of what the economy would look like under his leadership. 

Corbyn said that while he had no “mecca” in mind, the Sacandianvian nations were most praise-worthy for their emphasis on education and social justice. 

He told business-leaders on Monday: “During my life I’ve managed to visit a very large number of countries and I’ve found good in all of them and I’ve found some things very bad in all of them as well...

“What I do admire is the sense of public investment and enterprise that comes with the Scandinavian countries and the way in which they prioritise education and social justice in their thinking.”

Peter Nicholls / Reuters
Corbyn revealed he was quite the jet-setter

He also pointed to the innovative spirit of those from poorer communities in Africa and Latin America.

“I admire the innovation and skills of many living in very poor countries, particularly trying to develop sustainable and innovative agriculture in a very difficult situation.

“I admire many African and Latin American countries that have also done a great deal to promote innovative ideas and growth.

“I think we learn from each other, we learn from travels, we learn from ideas - 
I don’t have any one mecca anywhere.”

In his CBI speech, Corbyn attacked the government for creating “huge uncertainty” by having no plan for Brexit

Bloomberg via Getty Images
May was criticisied for her 'bad' Brex business interventions

He said: “I believe when it comes to government there’s bad intervention and good intervention.

“Bad intervention wants to name and shame you on the basis of how many foreign workers you employ.

“Bad intervention wants to punish you with a shambolic Brexit that limits our ability to trade with the world’s largest trading bloc on our doorstep...

“This government’s attitude seems just plain offensive.”

May gave a speech at the CBI conference earlier in the day, in which she gave her biggest hint yet that the government might seek a transitional exit from the EU. 

She said: “Obviously as we look at the negotiation we want to get the arrangement that is going to work best for the UK and the arrangement that is going to work best for business in the UK. And I’m conscious that there will be issues that will need to be looked at.

“I understand the point that Paul [Drechsler] has made, others have made this point, that people don’t want a cliff edge, they want to know with some certainty how things are going to go forward.

“That will be part of the work that we do in terms of the negotiation that we are undertaking with the European Union.”

She also watered down her Tory leadership campaign pledge to install worker representation on company boards.

TUC General Secretary Frances O-Grady responded that “workers on boards” should mean “workers on boards”.

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