LIFESTYLE

Skin Cancer Tool Reveals Your Risk Of Developing The Disease Over The Next Three Years

It's said to be 80% accurate.

24/03/2016 12:08 GMT

People aged 40 and over can now do an online test to see if they're likely to develop skin cancer.

The online skin cancer assessment tool, which was developed by a group of Australian researchers headed by Professor David Whiteman, asks a series of questions to assess a person's risk of developing keratinocyte cancer in the next three years.

Keratinocyte cancer is the name given to the most common types of skin cancer - basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

Professor Whiteman told ABC: "This is for people who don't yet have a skin cancer and it's to try and find those people early and get them into the medical system."

Mihai Simonia via Getty Images

The online test is currently being tested by doctors in Australia.

It is said to be 80% accurate at identifying risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in people aged 40 and over, within the next three years. 

Professor Whiteman said he hopes the tool will help GPs and skin cancer clinics who are "overwhelmed" with patients.

"We expect that in future doctors will be able to use this tool to determine how often patients aged 40 and over should be checked," he explained.

"As new treatments become available, this tool should also help doctors to accurately identify those patients who are most likely to benefit from early intervention."

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The tool asks questions surrounding age, gender, tanning ability, number of freckles, and if you've ever had any skin cancers removed.

It then assesses risk level and those who are at "high risk" are urged to book a doctor's appointment.

The test doesn't, however, assess a person's risk of developing melanoma. 

Experts added that, for now, the test should only be used as a guide rather than a substitute for visiting your GP. 

You can take the test here. 

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