Work And Pensions Secretary Stephen Crabb's Voting Record On Welfare And Benefits

It makes for quite the read.

19/03/2016 13:16 | Updated 19 March 2016

Stephen Crabb, the new Work and Pensions Secretary, has consistently voted for reducing housing benefit, his voting record shows.

Crabb has also sided against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to disability.

Data from, compiled by They Work For You, reveals Crabb's voting record on key legislation within his new brief at the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

How Stephen Crabb voted on Welfare and Benefits

  • Consistently voted for reducing housing benefit for social tenants deemed to have excess bedrooms (which Labour describe as the "bedroom tax")

  • Consistently voted against raising welfare benefits at least in line with prices

  • Consistently voted against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to illness or disability

  • Consistently voted for making local councils responsible for helping those in financial need afford their council tax and reducing the amount spent on such support

  • Consistently voted for a reduction in spending on welfare benefits

  • Almost always voted against spending public money to create guaranteed jobs for young people who have spent a long time unemployed

Data from

Dan Kitwood via Getty Images
Stephen Crabb, then Secretary of State for Wales, speaks to delegates on the final day of the Conservative Party Conference last year

The speedy appointment of Crabb to the DWP follows Iain Duncan Smith’s dramatic decision to stand down last night, citing cuts to disability benefits in George Osborne’s budget.

Prime Minister David Cameron said he was “puzzled and disappointed” by Duncan Smith's decision.

Before Crabb’s appointment was announced, HuffPost UK’s Executive Editor for Politics, Paul Waugh, said he would be “the perfect man to step in”.

“He’s smart, passionate and has had such a tough upbringing that no one could claim he has a silver spoon in his mouth,” Waugh wrote.

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