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10 Things to Consider Before Having Kids in an Interracial Relationship

30/03/2016 11:16 | Updated 30 March 2016

If you're planning to have children and you're in an interracial relationship, consider these most common complications every parent of mixed heritage children has faced at one point or another.

There are so many amazing things that being part of a mixed family can bring to your life but of course like anything, beauty is complex. These are simple reminders to make you aware of what is coming and what you may need to discuss with your partner beforehand. As your children get older, try understanding each issue with as much openness and understanding as you would any other.

Your child may have a different accent/ culture to you
"Mama, say 'water'", my oldest daughter pleaded. She laughed as I repeated the word with my heavy-Canadian accent, "waaaderrr". I never thought my kids would be making fun of my accent. I just assumed we'd all speak the same, we're a family, after all. Growing up first generation British and the daughter of mixed parents, (Nigerian and Canadian/Iranian/British), my three daughters are bound to have different accents, cultural experiences and different identities. As parents, it's something you know that will happen when you have mixed race kids, but it's tough when you realise they're having completely different cultural experiences than you did growing up- even opting to adopt one culture or identity over another. As mixed kids, it's their prerogative. Their language, accent, home, even their look is different to yours and though that may be the case with all kids, being of mixed parentage, it's even more pronounced. Hey, some may even switch between accents depending on who they're with. Accents, like any other part of their identity, can become fluid for mixed kids.

Consider that this is new territory for both you and your partner
Let's face it, most parents of mixed children are of one heritage themselves and so finding themselves in this unknown world of mixed parenting is a minefield. It's the constant arguments over whose childhood was better versus what is best for the child all the while both you being able to pass on your cultural identity in the process... It's hard and neither of you is experienced in this area. You're both so different and coming from such different backgrounds, you've never had to compromise on culture before. And inevitably you'll both probably feel quite strongly about passing on your traditions and values.

Like anything, keeping the lines of communication open is the best way to deal with these discussions. I remember the discussion my hubby and I had about piercing our firstborn's ears. In Nigerian culture, it was commonplace, even expected- so much so that despite our little one decked out in frilly dresses, relatives and friends would often insist they couldn't tell she was a girl or not because she didn't have pierced ears. We kept that conversation going for a long time, raising it at various times until we both came to an understanding about why it was important (or not) and what she (our daughter) would miss out on without it. It may seem trivial now but it took on more significance because we were so new to the interracial parenting scene.

Your child may adopt one identity over another
Being biracial black and white, identity is and will be fluid. Associating different aspects to each cultural background, our kids are likely to adopt one over the other at different points in their lives. If they can pass as white, they might only identify as white. As they get older and they start to understand skin colour and race on a deeper level, they may identify more with their black parent, even going so far as to say they are not white (at all). Another thing to consider is that siblings may identify differently from each other because of how different they look and their experiences as a result. My oldest daughter is darker skinned, looks much less 'mixed' than my other two and the only one with an identifiable Nigerian name. She will, inevitably have a different experience than the younger two- even opting to identify as black 'like Daddy' instead of being mixed. Be ready for it all and accept your children for who they are and where they're at.

You'll feel pressure from family about how to raise her/him
After the joy of having a new grandchild wears off, pressure will set in from family about how to raise your child. Starting from discussions about circumcision, ear piercing, the list goes on. Be prepared. Parents are likely to get involved in any family but when it comes to identity and culture, families can come from a place of fear of losing their cultural traditions when it comes to your children. Older relatives may even be stuck in a different generation where things were done for hygienic, economic or practical reasons. Those reasons might not exist today and may not apply to your home country so decide whether these traditions are still right for you and your children.

By the same token, don't just discount it just because it's not practically relevant; it might still be important to your partner because of its cultural implications. The first bath in Nigerian culture for our little ones was a great example of this. It was important back in the day because midwives performed many procedures that we replicate in today's Western hospitals. Hence, its significance is not practical anymore but the cultural value I could recognise, was still relevant and important to my husband.

You'll need to go with the times
Your kids are going to take on some aspects of your culture, but not all. Just as you probably did growing up and then going on to have your own family. Even as they grow, they might not think that going to mosque is that cool or they may turn a cool eye to the traditional stews you slave over every night, preferring instead fish fingers and fries because that's what their friends are eating. I remember that feeling well, wincing in shame when one of my friends commented that my house always smelled like exotic food. I hated being different. I now try to make a fusion of food so my little ones can experience it all. As they get older though, trust that your children will be proud of who they are. Maturity brings with it pride in being able to be different and feeling comfortable. Keep that in mind when you're having that argument with your little one over whether they can wear their superman outfit over their agbada (Nigerian traditional garb).

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Mixed.Up.Mama is raising three mixed race daughters of Iranian/Nigerian and English descent. She is a mama blogger who writes about mixed race parenting and all things mixed heritage.

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