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Let's Talk About Gay Sex And Drugs

06/02/2017 00:42 | Updated 06 February 2017
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Salt N Pepa knew what they were talking about when they penned Let's Talk About Sex.

While writing this blog Heat Radio blasted it out, quite by accident. But I think it's a shame that it's probably because of cultish and hilarious nature rather than because we truly believe in its message.

How did I reach this conclusion? It's been 26 years since that song was released - and we still aren't talking about sex as much as we should.

The song, with lyrics discussing the dangers of unprotected sex, was genuinely criticising the American media's curt nature towards talking about sex when it was released. It could have been come out this week with how far the conversation has moved on.

So why don't we talk about sex? In the UK, we can look to the very awkwardly polite British nature we have, as one of our core stumbling blocks.

I think it's a shame that it is impolite to bring up glory holes in most conversations, but I understand that isn't everyone's cup of tea. But I do think it would be darn super if we were able to talk about some sex openly.

Perhaps it's down to the mere fact that sex education in the UK, is just so awful.

I'm a National Student Pride graduate volunteer, and as I've been talking about the event (which is at the end of the month), it has amazed me just how many times people told me almost exactly the same story of their sex education.

The key focus of the panels this year are on Sex and Relationships education. Trust me; it's a great conversation starter.

But for so many different people to bring up the same terrible VHS they were played at school is outstanding.

It's that one where everyone is walking around naked getting ready for school and work.

Remember it too? It's super casual.

Though I'll save my opinions of naturism for another blog, this video has apparently been in use for years. People from generations above and below me have recounted its awkward nature, almost identically describing the VHS frame for frame - only to follow up with how ill-equipped it left them.

It may have been amazing at pausing, and zooming in [insert your own size joke here] to show the lucky viewer what the difference between a penis and vagina was, but my guess is - most of us could have worked that out ourselves.

Seriously, Let's Talk

So it was when I was returning from Soho, the centre of gay London, after attending the recurring Let's Talk About Gay Sex and Drugs event I was so content. True to its history, once again the LGBT community had said; enough is enough.

If you're not going to help us, we'll help ourselves. We'll find a space to talk about sex.

There are few events, where I've left feeling a complete sense of belonging. But both Let's Talk About Gay Sex and Drugs and National Student Pride prove the LGBT community's resilience.

The stories I've heard at these events are a testament to the liberating power of words, stories and knowledge.

Time and time again, at the root of so many of the stories I've heard at Student Pride and Let's Talk - whether they are about substance abuse, mental health, consent abuse and STI transmissions - was a call for "I wish I'd known more".

While the world has been caught up, quite rightly, in a world of Brexit and Trump; many different attempts from both the left and right, to bring in compulsory Sex and Relationships education have been thwarted in Parliament. So I implore you, keep a close eye on the legislation happening on Sex Education too.

When Winston Churchill's cabinet first spoke about the legislation that made it illegal for gay men to have sex - he was very right to have said, "Remember that we can't expect to put the whole world right with a majority of 18."

However, that same cabinet meeting set in motion the commissioning of the Wolfenden report. Which, eventually led to the partial decriminalisation of gay sex that we celebrate 50 years of in 2017.

Over the coming months, consider that notion as we reshape a post-Brexit nation, remember - change needs lots of voices and stories.

So whether you write to your MP about compulsory SRE - let Salt N Pepa become your theme tune - and talk about sex.

You can join the open mic, Let's Talk About Gay Sex and Drugs every month at Ku Klub.

The next events in LGBT History Month are on Thursday 9th Feb, at Ku Klub and at National Student Pride, Saturday 25th Feb at the University Of Westminster (open to all, not just students)

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