THE BLOG

Staying 'Normal' As an Entrepreneur

14/05/2015 16:53 BST | Updated 13/05/2016 10:59 BST

Being an entrepreneur is a privilege.

I am honoured to take ownership of my life, my income, my hopes and dreams, and I am beyond excited that I have a job role that is entirely, utterly, 100% mine to play with.

As an online entrepreneur, I am acutely aware of the company I keep and the culture in which I operate.

Entrepreneurs in the circles I hang out in throw around terms like "upper limit problem", "mentor", "mastermind", "money blocks", "funnels", and "opt-ins", in our every day language.

I hang out in Whatsapp, Skype, and Facebook with my peers and mentors.

I devour ebooks, coaching and programmes on a regular basis.

This last weekend I spent with my best girlfriends in the world - my school mates.

These guys chuckle about me being "some kind of guru on the internet".

I love that they don't really know what I do.

I love that they laugh that people spend money to hang out with me when they do it all the time for free.

I love that I am just me with my nearest and dearest outside my working life.

Being normal is key in finding the life/work switch off as a solopreneur.

In a world where life and business is so blurred as a self employed mum, I am thrilled that I can do the school run where no-one knows I am "someone from the internet". That I can get home and hold global calls, podcast interviews, or host masterclasses for hundreds of women and I am to all intents and purposes, just Jo.

Because I am just Jo.

As an entrepreneur I adore what I do.

I am honoured to be able to reach as many people as I do.

But, I also need to have a pocket of life where I am normal, where I am not quantified in fans, email subscribers, clients, revenue, site visits or anything else.

In all honesty, the language we talk as entrepreneurs is like a private gang, a members club of learning curves, personal development and battle scars.

Being visible online has it;s own challenges as well as rewards.

So, hiding and being a pre-tech and online version of me is certainly welcome from time to time - but I would certainly miss my support team and entrepreneur family and am glad of our mutual madness.