THE BLOG

An Unpresidented Act

22/01/2017 17:41 GMT | Updated 22/01/2017 17:41 GMT

At the time of writing, an estimated 4.7 million people, in 673 cities, across all seven continents marched in protest yesterday. And I was one of them.

On his first full day of presidency, Donald Trump witnessed legions of women, children and men marching for the human rights he appears hell-bent on reversing. We marched to protest the rights of immigrants, women, the LGBTQ community, the disabled... you can read the full list of guiding principles here.

I wanted to march alone. I received countless requests from friends wanting to rally with me on Grosvenor Square in London but I wanted to do this solo. Quite apart from the stress caused by trying to find a few people in a sea of thousands there is something beautiful about standing there alone, in the winter sunshine, among a multitude who share your vision and values in the world.

I like listening to the conversations around me, joining in with some of them, or not. Hearing a gang of young girls chanting "Lick it, stroke it, just don't grab it!" and then seeing the guys around them quietly grin in acknowledgement and support.

I felt emotional seeing a woman in her seventies walking towards me at the start, wearing her pink 'pussy hat', clutching a sign that read, "yes, I'm still protesting this shit." And then as I approached the square, a pussy riot - a huge crowd of determined women, wide-eyed children witnessing them and a surprising number of men standing alongside them. I was glad of my sunglasses at that moment.

On my way in, I saw the face of a distraught woman, arguing with her boyfriend who kept saying, "but they're just marching against democracy!" I wish I'd reached out to her and pulled her with me and away from her inevitably Brexiteer boyfriend.

On the way round the square, a young, wild-eyed Men's Rights Activist shouted at us: "Why don't you drown in your tears, you bunch of LOSERS!" We all laughed so much he ended up laughing with us. Maybe he was surprised at suddenly gaining the attention of so many women - it's likely to have been a problem for him in the past.

A good friend of mine who is a good man, commented on Facebook that he hoped we'd be marching for men as well. As ever, I am amazed that so many men out there think that women marching is a direct assault on THEIR rights. How nice it would have been for him to have been marching alongside me instead of questioning the motivation for what I was doing. That's what felt so good about seeing so many men marching with us - no questions, no 'what about the menz?' trolling, just quiet solidarity. 'We know this is an issue and we stand with you. Patriarchy is damaging for us, too."

Knowing that I was one of millions of people marching worldwide felt phenomenal. Gloria Steinem, arguably the mother of third-wave feminism, was marching in America and I was marching with her. It was the biggest global rally she had ever witnessed, and I was part of it.

And to those who might ask, what difference will it make? This is what she said:

We are linked, we are not ranked, and this is a day that will change us forever because we are together, each of us individually and collectively will never be the same again. When we elect a possible president, we too often go home. We've elected an impossible president. We're never going home. We're staying together, and we're taking over.

Today feels very different.

There is hope.

First published on Because I Can blog.