A Woman Scorned

04/05/2016 12:03

Last month, Beyoncé broke the internet after she released her visual album, Lemonade. It has been deemed the 'most elaborate diss in hip-hop history', given that much of the content is given to Jay Z's alleged cheating with 'Becky with the good hair'.

I personally love a good 'woman scorned' outburst - I don't subscribe to the dignified silence, I prefer a huge wodge of revenge served with a side salad of cold blood. Even better if you can deliver the requisite revenge like a deadly artistic assassin, making you look so glaringly bright that the guy in question can't bear to set eyes on you again.

Well done, Bey.

What always strikes me about these situations is that the women scorned are always burning so much brighter than these guys in the first instance. They're often more talented (Bey), intelligent (Hillary) and better-looking (everyone) than the guys who've cheated on them. I've seen women I consider to be magnificent left for someone with nothing more than a homely smile, and I've wondered if that's the motivation. They can't handle the magnificence, let alone control it, so they find someone infinitely more 'manageable'.

Time and time again I've seen women going through this, and there are always friends exclaiming, 'But she's not a patch on you!' And now I know that this is the whole point of it. The cheating is a way of re-establishing a form of control, and they will always opt for a 'not-a-patch' option. It happened to me a few years ago and I understood straight away. Steps had been taken to try and control me and they hadn't worked. Cue an easier target.

I remember that scene in Sex and the City where Samantha posts leaflets all over the city, telling everyone that her 'Richard' is, in fact, a dick. When I enacted a digital version of that, I felt the same bewitching sense of control and freedom, as the 'leaflets' were similarly carried away on the wind.

I'm never going to be someone who sits back and silently suffers - I'm on Team Trierweiler. Valérie Trierweiler wrote a bestselling memoir of her betrayal by François Hollande (Thank You For This Moment), and it is described as:

300-odd pages of deliciously backhanded barbs, sentimental hand-wringing and vicious putdowns, seasoned with large dollops of self-justification.

The same article describes her as 'magnificently unrepentant.' Amen to that, sister.

I don't know why, but a strange silence descends when a woman pours out her scorn. Men call her a 'vindictive harpy', and in hushed tones, women tell her she should be more dignified. What if we don't? What if we call them out on it like Bey? The world doesn't end, does it? It just realises we know what's going on and we're not prepared to live with it.

The greatest service to womanhood Bey has done thus far is to make 'calling a guy out on his shit' into an art form.

There has never been a greater woman scorned...