Africa

As It's Light Out in the West, Africa Needs Help to Switch On

Ben Good | Posted 31.05.2014 | UK
Ben Good

On Saturday, 29th of March, many westerners switched off their lights to celebrate Earth Hour. The Big Ben, Times Square in New York and the Kremlin in Moscow were just a few of the iconic landmarks that joined millions of people who dimmed their lights to raise awareness about saving energy and reducing our carbon footprint.

How Your Clothes Can Restore Sight in Ethiopia

Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall | Posted 31.05.2014 | UK
Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall

Around the world 100million older people have to live on less than 60p a day. Many of them support and care for their grandchildren. The grandparents often go hungry so that the children can eat. Many are also having to cope with the challenges of getting older, including managing difficult health conditions.

Volunteer Stories: Experiencing South Africa

Frontier | Posted 24.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Frontier

I wanted to travel to Africa because my dad is South African and had lived there for most of his life. He talks about the things he'd experienced which made me want to go! The South African experience, for me, looked perfect! Doing voluntary work, but also travelling combined with a set route made me at ease because I like to have a plan.

Never Has the Phrase 'Adapt or Die' Been So Apt

Ben Price | Posted 23.05.2014 | UK Entertainment
Ben Price

The world over, we are seeing ever more cases of extreme weather, from the recent floods in the UK to wild fires in Australia. With each incident comes the familiar assurances that - this time - the necessary action will be taken to make sure there is no repeat. The reality is we have no choice, as every country faces the fact that climate change - and its impact on the weather - is no longer a distant prediction, but a daily reality. And for the poorest people on the planet, the need to change is not just a matter of saving money, but saving lives.

Barclays Needs to Clean Up Its Shameful Act

Tom Fyans | Posted 21.05.2014 | UK Politics
Tom Fyans

When Antony Jenkins took the helm at Barclays he promised to clean up a bank that had been badly scarred by a seemingly relentless stream of scandals. To re-enforce the point he sent an email to his 140,000 staff saying that he wanted to bring new ethical standards to Barclays. Those who didn't want to sign up to them were told they should leave.

Unfair and Not Lovely: The Global Skin Bleaching Epidemic Hasn't Gone Away

Dimple Vijaykumar | Posted 18.05.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Dimple Vijaykumar

Many hope so, but for now, it seems the struggle against centuries of the 'Fair and Lovely' culture rages on, while skin-bleaching itself remains the norm amongst many in Asian and African communities.

The Ugandan Gay Rights Crisis and the Hypocrisy of the West

Liam Deacon | Posted 16.05.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Liam Deacon

Watching Uganda's president chuckle as he signed into law a bill that meant life improvement for homosexuality and not reporting gay family members a criminal offence was chilling. Many western observers shared an intuition that the West should surely respond in swift and principled manner to this 'odious' bill...

Coming Back to Reality...

DJ Lora | Posted 13.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle
DJ Lora

Despite not being able to shower for 7 days, missing my gorgeous bed and having to wear the same clothes for several days in a row. Taking on Kilimanjaro was without a doubt, one of the most incredible expeditions I have ever done in my life.  

The Third World Fallacy: What It Really Means to Be From a Third World Country

Awoowe Hamza | Posted 13.05.2014 | UK
Awoowe Hamza

If you're expecting me to paint a picture of the struggles of those from developing countries to reinforce the first thought of an Aid commercial showing a young child that came to mind when you read the words 'Third World', then I am sorry to disappoint you.

How Cross-Border Trade Is Empowering Women and Fostering Peace in DRC

Maria Lange | Posted 10.05.2014 | UK Politics
Maria Lange

Through a collection of photographs and interviews, Crossings: The journey to peace challenges predominant narratives about eastern DRC, which focus on 'conflict trade' and 'rape' above broader lived experiences.

South Sudan: Give Peace (and Children) a Chance!

Unni Krishnan | Posted 07.05.2014 | UK
Unni Krishnan

In a group of 100 children, singing, playing and some crying, two girls stand out. Their names are Madiha, 9, and Lina, 4. It is not their unusual silence that catches my attention, but the way they frequently hug each other, often involuntarily...

LGBT Rights and Peace: Why Aren't We Talking About It?

Phil Vernon | Posted 06.05.2014 | UK Politics
Phil Vernon

While it is clearly important for peacebuilders to pay more attention to the marginalisation and repression of LGBT people, it's not always so obvious how we should do so...

Funding a Future Generation: Is Global Education on the Right Track?

Kat Pugh | Posted 04.05.2014 | UK
Kat Pugh

n a Western society, words are everywhere. Adverts on the tube, bus on billboards. There are words on our mobile phones, we can get apps which tell us the latest news, which tells us what is trending and which celebrity is pregnant, has been arrested or has overdosed...

Bringing Up the Bodies in Darfur

Olivia Warham | Posted 05.05.2014 | UK
Olivia Warham

It is bad enough that the international community averts its eyes from the state-sponsored horror that persists in Darfur and elsewhere in Sudan... We compound Darfur's suffering by failing to use our leverage in the region to ensure Bashir faces justice at the ICC.

Planet Appetite: Zooming Around Zimbabwe - More Than Just Safari

Rupert Parker | Posted 04.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Rupert Parker

Most tourists who visit Zimbabwe never get further than Victoria Falls, but breathtaking game reserves, monumental ruins and the sheer warmth of the people, mean that it's worth exploring further.

Tax Evasion: The Main Cause of Global Poverty

Bella Mosselmans | Posted 29.04.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Bella Mosselmans

Just think, if the money lost to tax evasion was available for governments to allocate according to current spending patterns, the amount going towards health services could save an estimated 1.9 million children a year. That's approximately 21 fewer children dying in the time it took you to read this article.

Ethnic Conflict: Colonialism's Never-Aging Offspring

Awoowe Hamza | Posted 27.04.2014 | UK
Awoowe Hamza

Ethnic conflict as a term has become widely used as phrase to explain the majority (if not all) of the non-Western conflicts. Ethnicity itself has been used by political leaders to fuel conflict and consolidate political power and control over resources...

We Have Our Own Talk

Joanna Eede | Posted 25.04.2014 | UK
Joanna Eede

Towards the end of World War One, the German army had become adept at decoding the Allied Forces' radio codes. To avoid the enemy 'listening in', the ...

Congo Court Finds Briton Guilty of Killing Friend

Simon J Clark | Posted 21.04.2014 | UK
Simon J Clark

A joint British-Norwegian citizen was found guilty of killing his friend and cellmate in the Democratic Republic of Congo even though there was expert evidence to suggest he was innocent.

Don't Forget Child Soldiers - They Are Still on the Front Line

Sarah Dean | Posted 13.04.2014 | UK
Sarah Dean

12 February marks The International Day Against The Use Of Child Soldiers, otherwise known as Red Hand Day. It's an annual commemoration of children around the world caught in conflict but should also act as a reminder that this is a problem that is far from over.

Act Now, or Food Shortages Could Become a Problem for Us All

Professor Sir Gordon Conway | Posted 12.04.2014 | UK
Professor Sir Gordon Conway

It is time that we start asking ourselves important questions for how these challenges to our food supply will be addressed in years to come, and that the solutions are appropriate and equitable...

To Combat Cancer in Developing Countries, We Must Learn The Lessons of HIV And Malaria

Allan Pamba | Posted 08.04.2014 | UK
Allan Pamba

Think of disease in Africa and you maybe think of malaria. But this is not the whole picture. In Africa and across developing countries, people are living longer and their lifestyles are changing. With this shift, a different threat is emerging...

Will 2014 Be Another Year of Tears or the Beginning of Real Hope That We Will See an End to FGM?

Ann-Marie Wilson | Posted 07.04.2014 | UK
Ann-Marie Wilson

Later this week I am travelling to East Africa and I will spend a month meeting with anti-FGM campaigners, representatives from governments and non-governmental organisations working on development programmes and/or violence against women initiatives...

Britain Neglecting Citizen in Unfair Congo Murder Trial, Lawyer Says

Simon J Clark | Posted 29.03.2014 | UK
Simon J Clark

The UK government is neglecting a British former soldier who is losing an unfair murder trial in the Democratic Republic of Congo for the suicide of his cellmate and friend, his lawyer said.

Crisis in Central African Republic

Ian Lucas | Posted 21.03.2014 | UK Politics
Ian Lucas

The scale of the violence, which has intensified since November, has escalated rapidly. More than 1,000 people have died in the last month alone. A widespread culture of impunity has rendered women particularly vulnerable and sexual violence is being used to terrorise groups within the country. A million people have fled or been displaced from their homes, compounding the already desperate humanitarian crisis. Amidst the horror, there is also confusion - from those struggling to make sense of a conflict in a country where Christian and Muslim communities have coexisted peacefully in the past and where, now, intense religious division is leading to horrific violence.