Behaviour

Compassion and Kindness

Charlotte Ballantyne | Posted 02.12.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Charlotte Ballantyne

Compassion is a funny thing isn't it? Human emotions are complicated and difficult to understand; sometimes we can barely understand ourselves, let alone others. Motivations and reasons behind our actions and behaviours and responses can intersect, and finding the true root of a problem can seem impossible at times. Often, it isn't the answer we expect.

How to Break Bad Habits

Maggie Currie | Posted 08.11.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Maggie Currie

Whether it's that perpetual pile of clothes in the corner you're waiting to someday turn into gold, a self-proclaimed disability which renders you unable to refrain from interrupting, or a knack for timing your exit just so, so that someone else is continually left to do the washing up, now's the time to extinguish these habits before they turn into next year's resolutions.

Sweet Relief in Supermarkets

Dr Paul Zollinger-Read | Posted 28.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Dr Paul Zollinger-Read

It seems that supermarkets have a big role to play when it comes to helping people make better choices. Simple strategies, such as removing chocolate and sweets from checkouts and prompting the sale of fruit and veg, is a start. But can we apply similar ideas throughout the whole store?

The Power of a Positive Attitude to Learning

Julie Booth | Posted 27.05.2014 | UK
Julie Booth

I am often amazed by just how enthusiastic some children are about school and wonder what it is that sparks a real lifelong love of learning in a child. ..

Revealed: The Top 13 Things Brits Are Scared Of

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 24.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle

In the past, we've met people who are scared of cats, buttons and vomiting, but none of these have made the cut for the top 13 list compiled in a YouG...

WATCH: Take This Quick Test To See If You're A Good Liar

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 31.01.2014 | UK Lifestyle

Lying - some people are great at it (Lance Armstrong practically made an Olympic sport of it) while others are miserably bad. Most people can unde...

Oiling the Wheels in 2014

Gloria Moss | Posted 06.03.2014 | UK
Gloria Moss

Are these experiences from 2013 familiar? You arrive on a train and are greeted by a message warning of the penalties awaiting those with incorrect tickets; you arrive at a department store and notice a security guard; you are slightly behind with your Council tax payments and a top-hatted bailiff turns up on your doorstep.

Confidence Sapping Friends, Family and Colleagues

Maggie Currie | Posted 29.01.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Maggie Currie

Although it is a well known fact, there are still some people who are totally unaware that the people with whom they have the most contact and hang around will have either a positive or negative effect on their levels of self-esteem and confidence.

Poorna Bell

Should Pregnant Women Automatically Be Offered A Seat?

HuffingtonPost.com | Poorna Bell | Posted 18.10.2013 | UK Lifestyle

The question of whether to offer a pregnant woman a seat on public transport or let's say, at the Houses of Parliament may seem like it has a very sim...

You Can't Eat Differently Until You Start to Think Differently

Alan Jackson | Posted 29.10.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Alan Jackson

"Blimey Sandra that avocado must have been the size of a beach-ball!" An average avocado (150g) contains 240 kcal and Sandra had put on the equivalent of over 10,000kcals or 41 avocados in one week. I worried about this for some time. How could someone see things in such a way that was impossible for someone else to understand?

Is Your Dopamine in the Driving Seat?

Beth Burgess | Posted 22.10.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Beth Burgess

A brain chemical called dopamine may be responsible for more of your choices than you think. This much-misunderstood neurotransmitter, whose original function was to ensure our survival, has been somewhat hijacked by the modern world, meaning that more of us are likely to fall prey to addiction and other unwanted behaviours.

What Unavoidable Giant Object Is Messing Up Your Sleep?

PA/The Huffington Post UK | PA | Posted 26.07.2013 | UK Lifestyle

The moon has been blamed for many things - triggering aggression, violence and suicide - but now there's a new charge to lay at its door: bad sleep. ...

Woah There, Can You Be That Fussy?

Chanel de Yong | Posted 21.09.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Chanel de Yong

MY GOD, and I thought I was fussy? Are you that person who asks for extra ketchup or more garlic butter for your pizza at PIZZA EXPRESS, or do you want your dressing on the side?

Life Through Google's Eyes

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 01.05.2013 | UK Lifestyle

No one likes to imagine that Google knows more about their personality, than they do. However, a new viral video demonstrates that when it comes t...

A Teacher's Advice to Parents

Bansi Kara | Posted 04.06.2013 | UK Universities & Education
Bansi Kara

I think if teachers had just one opportunity to stand up to the nation and give advice to parents, they would probably all say very similar things. So, in the spirit of sharing and dispelling the awkwardness and to start a dialogue, this is what I want to say to parents.

Is Your Cat a Lion at Heart?

Simon King | Posted 18.05.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Simon King

Have you ever wondered why your pet cat rubs up against your legs, kneads your thighs with its forepaws or sleeps on top of a wardrobe? These, and many other behaviours, can be attributed to the tiger lurking within your pet tigger.

Can Fun and Games Help Save the Planet?

Paula Owen | Posted 26.04.2013 | UK Tech
Paula Owen

During Climate Week (March 4-10) I am putting this theory to the test with a Fun and Games to Save the Planet event at the London Science Museum on March 6 and we are inviting people from all walks of life to come and 'have a go'.

A Univeral Panacea? The Empathy-Led Curriculum

Bansi Kara | Posted 30.03.2013 | UK Universities & Education
Bansi Kara

Empathy, or the lack thereof, causes so many of the daily frustrations in teaching and prevents so much of the learning that could take place in the classroom, that it seems foolhardy to ignore the potential impact of examining this concept in detail.

Why I'm Not For Nudging

Dave Clements | Posted 07.12.2012 | UK
Dave Clements

I was recently at University College London to hear a talk on behaviour change. "Nudging methods ... have become increasingly popular" read the blurb. "Underlying all of this, however, is the nagging question of whether it is ethical, desirable or sustainable to be nudging people in a desired direction." Indeed. "Or, is it a case of technological fudging, where we may be covering over deeper problems?". Well, yes it is, I thought.

The Olympics and an Unhealthy Interest in our Behaviour

Dave Clements | Posted 11.10.2012 | UK
Dave Clements

Is it really any surprise that 'lifestyle rationing' is beginning to undermine the notion that all are equally deserving of care and treatment in the NHS, when the medical profession are being urged to take an unhealthy interest in the way people choose to live their lives?

The London Riots, a Psychiatrist's Perspective

Carmine Pariante | Posted 06.10.2012 | UK
Carmine Pariante

Exactly a year ago, hundreds of kids misbehaved really badly, so why has nobody asked the question? Have we - society, government, family - done something wrong? Why the loud silence? Oh, sorry, I forgot - they are they just nasty little rioters, and should go to prison. There is nothing else to ask. Where is the reflection, the understanding, the questions? Those arrested during the riots mainly came from deprived areas and had the poorest educational backgrounds. They set fire to their own communities, and looted consumerist goods − plasma TVs, "branded" fashionable electronics and expensive shoes. Why did they do what they did?

Who's The Boss

Clive Norman | Posted 04.10.2012 | UK Lifestyle
Clive Norman

As a dog walker I am better placed than most to observe and learn about the idiosyncrasies of our furry friends. As we know dogs evolved from wolves and have become our closest animal friends.

Exclusion Figures Prove We Need to Tackle Root Causes Behind Bad Behaviour

Anne Marie Carrie | Posted 29.09.2012 | UK
Anne Marie Carrie

When you see an unruly child making a scene at school it's easy to dismiss them as irresponsible and reckless. What people don't realise is that behind inappropriate and erratic actions often lies a tragic story.

School Exclusion Data Tells us More About Schools Than About Children

Dr Anna Carlile | Posted 28.09.2012 | UK Universities & Education
Dr Anna Carlile

There needs to be a louder public conversation about the ways in which the media perpetuates political myths about children and young people... And children in schools are constantly blamed for failings in the schooling system.

Bad News Is Bad News

Mark Fletcher-Brown | Posted 24.09.2012 | UK
Mark Fletcher-Brown

But if you were thinking of going to the Olympics next week, might you be less inclined to do so as a result of the coverage of security problems. And if coverage creates fear, should journalists be held responsible for the way that they choose to cover particular stories?