Blood Donation

National Blood Week: Why We Should All Be Donating Now

Sarah Moyes | Posted 12.08.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Sarah Moyes

I was 25 years old when I stepped into the Glasgow Blood Donor centre to give blood for the first time. It had always been something I had thought about doing, but like most of the population I'd just never really got round to it. In Scotland, only 5% of us are active donors meaning National Blood Week is more important than ever.

Blood Donors Urged To Come Forward Before Christmas - When Stocks Run Low

PA | Posted 12.11.2013 | UK Lifestyle

Blood donors are being urged to come forward in the run-up to the festive season as blood stocks run low. November through to New Year is tradition...

Nine Ways Gamification Could Increase Blood Donations

Andrew Tipp | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Tech
Andrew Tipp

Only four per cent of people in the UK actually donate, and NHS Blood and Transplant reported that over the summer stocks dipped significantly. That leaves a lot of the population depending on a relatively small number of donors. So how can we encourage more people to start giving a pint of the red stuff? My suggestion is gamification.

Bleeding Them Dry

Judi Sutherland | Posted 11.08.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Judi Sutherland

I hazarded a guess that, if the NHSBT is so often short of stocks, and begging new donors to come forward, it might be a bright idea if their production line didn't prevent people from giving their donation.

Grief And Gratitude As NHS Teams Up With Facebook

Huffington Post UK | Felicity Morse | Posted 01.05.2012 | UK

Facebook and the NHS have teamed up to allow people to sign up for organ donation on the social network, which can be published to their timeline as a...

The not so gay Blood Donation ban is not Quite Lifted

Zoe O'Connell | Posted 08.11.2011 | UK Politics
Zoe O'Connell

First of all, it's not a gay blood donation ban! No, I'm not ranting about Trans exclusion this time, but a wider issue - it banned bisexual men too, but lesbians are OK. It's a ban on donations from men who have had sex with men. Or MSM, for short, because that's a bit of a mouthful.

Casualties From the War on AIDS

Philip Dayle | Posted 02.10.2011 | UK Politics
Philip Dayle

When AIDS became known in the early 1980's, there was huge uncertainty about how HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, was transmitted. A sense of fear characterised the way the public responded to the disease. From the public health policies that were made in response to AIDS, the one that remains the best example of utter panic is the ban on gay men giving blood. The war-on-AIDS view is flawed because it stigmatises gay men, as wanton sex fiends, all given to dangerous sexual activities. It also supports the fallacy that the HIV virus may be contained simply by eliminating those who are considered to be the main carriers, from activities of a communal nature. It is this reasoning that leads policy makers to believe that maintaining a discriminatory gay blood ban, serves a useful public health purpose.