Book Review

Cat Out of Hell by Lynne Truss - Book Review

Robert Bradley | Posted 28.03.2014 | UK Entertainment
Robert Bradley

Firstly, I must state that I am not the biggest fan of cats; an animal that is so fleetingly your pet, only ever belongs to your family exclusively on it's own terms. Unlike dogs, cats have always appeared to have an air of beguiling independence and a haze of evil surrounding them.

The Golden Days of Hollywood Rediscovered

Amal Fashanu | Posted 20.03.2014 | UK Entertainment
Amal Fashanu

With the fanfare and build up to the Oscars, it seems timely to take a trip back to Hollywood's Golden Age. The release of the magnificent "I Used to be in Pictures", by twins Austin and Howard Mutti-Mewse, intoxicatingly takes us back to this sumptuous, glorious era.

Book Review: The Explorer by James Smythe

Robert Bradley | Posted 04.03.2014 | UK Entertainment
Robert Bradley

Ever since my first encounter with the glowing blue introduction text of "A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.." I have enjoyed a boundless love affair with outer space.

Book Review: The Great Escaper by Simon Pearson

Robert Bradley | Posted 30.10.2013 | UK Entertainment
Robert Bradley

Having served in the Army Air Corps for a number of years and coming from a family military background, this tale of the original hero of The Great Escape, made famous from the Hollywood movie of the same name, location and dates, but an altogether completely different list of characters, (as only Hollywood could ever do and get away with) was most intriguing.

Book Review: You Can't Read This Book by Nick Cohen

Robert Bradley | Posted 25.10.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Robert Bradley

Nick's book is perhaps one of the best I've read all year. Inside you'll find his research will both disgust and enlighten; you might even cry, you may throw up, but you certainly won't be cheerful. Cohen has successfully lifted the veil on the myth of free speech and as a result, he's perfectly revealed all the mendacity of those that claim we have it.

Book Review: The Returned by Jason Mott

Robert Bradley | Posted 16.10.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Robert Bradley

Mott has written the novel in a way that you expect it to be an account from one of the more educated characters, whom often doubts their dates and so forth. This use of engagement with the reader, allows the mysterious narrator to guide you through the town and the story, with a somewhat effortless ease.

The London Novel Revived: 'Soho, 4am' by Nuala Casey

Jason Holmes | Posted 24.09.2013 | UK Entertainment
Jason Holmes

Nuala Casey's debut novel set in London's famed bohemian quarter - concerns itself with four ordinary Londoners who get caught up in the cloying hysteria of 6 July 2005, the day Britain was announced as host of the Olympic Games. But as day breaks after a night of bacchanalia - the 4am in question - a day of infamy begins: 7/7, a date Londoners will never forget.

Review of 'Sud de France' By Caroline Conran

V.C. Linde | Posted 20.08.2013 | UK Lifestyle
V.C. Linde

Sud de France is as much a foodie travelog as it is a cookbook, there are lots of notes about the region which is wonderfully written and interesting to read. The familiarity that Conran has with this area of France shines through, the insight is thorough and while reading you feel that you have seen and tasted the area.

Book Review: 'Divided Nations' by Ian Goldin

John Bunzl | Posted 14.07.2013 | UK Politics
John Bunzl

This is a great little book that tells you everything you need to know about global governance and why it's failing. Existing global institutions such...

Book Review of 'Commons People: MPs Are Human Too'

Michael Dugher | Posted 19.05.2013 | UK Politics
Michael Dugher

But in an era of continued cynicism about politicians, whose reputations nose-dived further after the MPs' expenses scandal of the last parliament, and at a time of falling participation in our democracy, Russell's book has a bigger objective than just trying to show politicians in a 'human' light.

Our World Is Not Black and White: A Poetry Book Review

Sumeet Grover | Posted 16.05.2013 | UK Entertainment
Sumeet Grover

On one hand, poetry of trauma offers the process of healing a psychologically wounded mind for those who have been subjected to mentally constricting and damaging behaviour from trusted relationships or even repeated exposure to violence. On the other hand, it needs caution if such poetry is widely promoted to a large audience, because in some of such works, the distinction between real and unreal can be diminished.

From Rags to Riches in Lahore: Mohsin Hamid's 'How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia'

Nauman Khalid | Posted 11.05.2013 | UK
Nauman Khalid

The first ten imperatives of Mohsin Hamid's How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia fulfil, with sly wit and humour, the premise of the self-help book t...

Review of 'Kitchen Memories' by Lucy Boyd

V.C. Linde | Posted 22.04.2013 | UK Lifestyle
V.C. Linde

As you would expect with 'memories' written right into the title this is part cookbook and part memoir. Lucy Boyd was brought up around food as the daughter of Rose Gray, lived in Italy and works in the gardens at the amazing Petersham Nurseries, quite a stunning résumé!

Book Review - The Miracle Inspector

Lucy Popescu | Posted 08.12.2012 | Home
Lucy Popescu

Dystopian novels are enjoying something of a renaissance. According to Goodreads, the number of dystopian-themed books is currently at its highest since the 1960s. Women writers seem to be leading the way.

How to Produce a West End Show - A Chat With Julius Green

Chris Cox | Posted 30.11.2012 | Home
Chris Cox

I met up with author and theatre producer Julius Green who has over 150 plays and musicals to his credit and is currently a senior producer for Bill Kenwright Limited to have a bit of a chat.

Book Review: 'Meg Rivers Home Baking'

V.C. Linde | Posted 23.09.2012 | Home
V.C. Linde

Meg Rivers Home Baking is an excellent baking cookbook for beginners all the way up.

Joy by Jonathan Lee - Review

David Hebblethwaite | Posted 16.08.2012 | Home
David Hebblethwaite

Joy Stephens would appear to have everything to live for - she's a successful City lawyer, about to be made a partner at the age of 33 - but she is planning to commit suicide before the day is out.

Tea and Cake by Emma Block Book Review

Akeela Bhattay | Posted 30.07.2012 | Home
Akeela Bhattay

Who doesn't enjoy a perfectly brewed cup of tea and slice of home made cake? If you're one of the minority that doesn't, well... in the words of Laure...

War in Peace: Tahmima Anam's 'The Good Muslim'

Nauman Khalid | Posted 08.07.2012 | Home
Nauman Khalid

Contemporary literature has witnessed many a vaunted wunderkind succumb to the dreaded second-novel syndrome. British-Bangladeshi Monica Ali's Brick Lane caused quite a flutter in literary London but was followed by a damp squib.

Everything's Fine by Socrates Adams (REVIEW)

Declan Tan | Posted 24.04.2012 | Home
Declan Tan

In his first novel, Socrates Adams doesn't seem that bothered about giving you an easy ride. Yes, there's the humour, a requirement for the 'alt lit' canon, and the thread with which he pulls you into his yarn, to have you wince for his characters and cringe through the situations they create for themselves. But it's not the laughs that make this debut an impressive one.

The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka - Review

David Hebblethwaite | Posted 06.04.2012 | Home
David Hebblethwaite

The narrator of Julie Otsuka's second novel is a chorus: the disembodied 'we' of a cohort of Japanese women who travel to the United States at the sta...

Freight by Mel Bosworth (REVIEW)

Declan Tan | Posted 25.03.2012 | Home
Declan Tan

You might remember those books - they probably still make them (I just checked, they do) - called Choose Your Own Adventure where you read a bit, then there's a little action, then you make the hero's choice at some bifurcation of the story.

'Ghost Milk: Calling Time on the Grand Project' by Iain Sinclair (REVIEW)

Declan Tan | Posted 14.02.2012 | Home
Declan Tan

There haven't been many coherent voices speaking out against the impending money-splash of the London Olympics next year. Most have been swept away by the shiny promised land of the new Westfield, or the dubious pledges buried in tonnes of polished glass and metal, said to be invested in our potentially athletic children's futures.

Review Of 'Notes from My Kitchen Table' by Gwyneth Paltrow

V.C. Linde | Posted 04.02.2012 | UK Entertainment
V.C. Linde

'Notes From My Kitchen Table' - Gwyneth Paltrow Boxtree - 2011 Photography: Ellen Silverman Notes from My Kitchen Table opens with an interesting for...

Sam Leith's Desert Island Books

Marissa Chen | Posted 30.12.2011 | Home
Marissa Chen

Sam Leith served as literary editor of the Daily Telegraph until 2008 and is the author of two award-winning books, Dead Pets and Sod's Law. His work has also appeared in - amongst other publications - the Evening Standard, The Guardian, and the Sunday Times. Leith's first novel, The Coincidence Engine was released in February.