Brands

Brexit, Brands and the Butterfly Effect

Richard Shotton | Posted 31.05.2016 | UK
Richard Shotton

One winter's day in 1961, Professor Edward Lorenz - one of the first meteorologists to use computer-based prediction - decided to run a weather simulation in his MIT lab. He'd run this one before, so he was pretty sure he knew what to expect. But on this occasion, to save time, he inputted the data using three decimals places, rather than six as he had used originally. So, for example, 23.348 rather than 23.347813: a difference of just 0.000187.

The Pursuit of Purpose and the Bono Problem

Neil Simpson | Posted 18.05.2016 | UK
Neil Simpson

"You can't predict destiny, that's the beauty" sounds like a cross between a line from a John Lennon song and a pre-battle speech from Braveheart. It'...

Brands Must Recognise We're a Million Different People From One Day to the Next

Richard Shotton | Posted 11.05.2016 | UK
Richard Shotton

The Verve song, "Bitter Sweet Symphony", is famous for its haunting chorus, infamous video and the Rolling Stone's accusations of plagiarism. However,...

The Short and Sad Lifespan of Your iPhone

Jon Sharpe | Posted 10.05.2016 | UK Tech
Jon Sharpe

In the future, as we begin to acclimatise ourselves with the pace of technological change - everything - from the 'internet of things', 'smart cities' and especially the notion of things being 'built to last' may come to feel outdated.

We Know You Know: Advertising With Irony

Neil Simpson | Posted 21.04.2016 | UK
Neil Simpson

With so many companies now 'laddering' their thinking to words like 'goodness' or happiness', or pondering their wider societal purpose, it's still worth remembering the value of a good ol' fashion (post-modern) sell.

Why Boycotting Brands Won't Help Garment Workers

Jenny Holdcroft | Posted 21.04.2016 | UK Style
Jenny Holdcroft

Garment workers desperately want to keep their jobs, so boycotting brands is not the way forward. They want to work. In many countries the garment industry is of the few avenues to financial independence for women.

Sharapova: The Irony of Brand Ethics

Cohan Chew | Posted 28.03.2016 | UK Sport
Cohan Chew

Sharapova's critics will highlight the fact that she should at least have read the anti-doping part of the email, considering the fact that she was taking a drug. However, she had been taking it for ten years, during which it was completely legal.

Does Your Brand Speak Emoji?

Jon Buss | Posted 08.03.2016 | UK Tech
Jon Buss

Can a little yellow face with tears of mirth rolling down its cheeks really be considered not just a word, but the word that best summarises communication in the year 2015?

Model Behaviour: Barbie, Body Image and the Importance of Transparency

Neil Douthwaite | Posted 27.11.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Neil Douthwaite

Decades of experience and leadership is not enough today to engender trust in a brand. People are looking for honesty and transparency from brands. With information and opinion only a click away it is much easier for consumers to feel that the wool is being pulled over their eyes. McDonalds acknowledged this and success has come their way.

The Future Of Advertising Will Be Gender Fluid

Philip Ellis | Posted 19.11.2015 | UK
Philip Ellis

Traditional gender roles will play a less prominent role in the lives of consumers over the next ten years, according to predictions made in a recent study. Food and beverage market research firm Canadean's findings suggest that the millennial market is nowhere near as concerned as previous generations with fixed notions of gender or sexuality.

VW Scandal Has Cost Company Its Most Important Asset - Its Honest Reputation

Vic Davies | Posted 28.09.2015 | UK
Vic Davies

There is a savage irony for the advertising industry in the crash of the VW brand. Of all car manufacturer brands VW was the one with the greatest advertising legacy, dating back to the now iconic ads produced by the DDB advertising agency, under the leadership of the legendary Bill Bernbach.

Jeremy Corbyn, Brand Strategist?

Gavin Devine | Posted 21.08.2015 | UK
Gavin Devine

Like it or not, political parties are brands - just try Googling 'political parties as brands' to see how many people have 'proved' this. Politicians have to stand out in a crowded and noisy marketplace, just like other brands. So why does the undifferentiated - or, to be fair, the less differentiated - middle work for them in a way that doesn't apply to consumer goods? What sets politics apart?

11 Of The Most Shocking Sexist Advertising Fails

The Huffington Post UK | Emily Kelly | Posted 14.08.2015 | UK Lifestyle

This week, BIC South Africa made jaws around the world drop with an ad for National Women's Day with the slogan 'Look like a girl, Act like a lady, T...

Beyond the Definition of Content

Richard Armstrong | Posted 29.07.2015 | UK
Richard Armstrong

Recently I spotted an article on the definition of content marketing - instantly intrigued that some noble soul had embarked on defining the "content ...

Building Influence in a Fragmented World - How Can Brands Forge Meaningful Relationships With Consumers?

David Pemsel | Posted 12.05.2016 | UK
David Pemsel

The digital revolution has caused seismic changes for brands - from the way they connect with their audiences, to the channels they can use to reach them. The way people are consuming news has been turned on its head, with more and more people accessing content from global sources, using multiple platforms and sharing huge volumes of self-produced content themselves.

Warwick Students Start Petition To Halt Uni Rebrand - Which Has Already Cost £80k

The Huffington Post UK | Lucy Sherriff | Posted 27.04.2015 | UK Universities & Education

A petition started by Warwick students to halt the rebrand of their university has reached 5,000 signatures, after it was revealed £80,000 had alread...

What's Wrong With a Little Infidelity?

Neil Davidson | Posted 30.05.2015 | UK
Neil Davidson

While British Airways scores well on loyalty, 75% of people define EasyJet as a "friend with benefits" according to the Human Brands research study. The same research also revealed consumers are having "secret relationships" with brands like McDonald's (60%) too, suggesting they are increasingly indiscriminate, placing ease and availability above brand loyalty.

Fail to Innovate - Fail as a Business

Colin Byrne | Posted 27.05.2015 | UK
Colin Byrne

Innovation is the lifeblood of any brand and failure to innovate only leads to failing as a business. Google could quite easily take their foot off the gas and simply boss the internet for a decade or two before bowing out to a new upstart, but they will never rest on their laurels - and that's the key. Never sit still. You're never too big to fail.

The One Thing Britain Hates More Than Marmite...

The Huffington Post UK | Louise Ridley | Posted 16.02.2015 | UK

Here's another prize for Nigel Farage after he was named "Briton of the Year" by The Times in 2014. But this award is not quite so appealing. His p...

Brand Potential: New Rules

Simon Pont | Posted 14.04.2015 | UK Entertainment
Simon Pont

Brands really do have the potential to evolve. Those brands that get it right over the next 10 years will pull away from the primordial pack, from the push messaging of boiler room marketeers. "Sell! Sell! Sell!" is not the future of branding.

The Magic of Christmas Should Be Just the Beginning

Robert Hocking | Posted 09.02.2015 | UK
Robert Hocking

If the only effort you make with those you love were once a year, you'd likely be left alone at Christmas. So why do brands and retailers show the love disproportionately at Christmas and then revert to the same-old, same-old throughout the rest of the year?

This Is How to End Fifa Corruption

Grant Feller | Posted 14.01.2015 | UK Sport
Grant Feller

The world's biggest brands should all pull out of their relationships with FIFA at the same time, complete with the knowledge that every single football fan - and pretty much every other consumer too - will hail them as heroes. Let their competitors take their place, let them spend billions propping up one of the world's most loathed institutions and face the opprobrium of customers whose sense of right and wrong will have been heightened by a mass walk-out.

What the World's Greatest Ever Urban Migration Means for Consumers and Brands

Alexis Nasard | Posted 06.12.2014 | UK
Alexis Nasard

The numbers are often quoted, but still remain staggering. The United Nations predicts that today's global population of 7 billion is going to rise to roughly 9 billion by 2050. In 2010, 3.6 billion people lived in cities. Fast forward forty years, and this will rise to 6.3 billion, 70% of the world's population.

Where There's Mystery, There's Margin

Justin Billingsley | Posted 09.11.2014 | UK
Justin Billingsley

The commoditization spiral has a gravity that slowly pulls all brands towards it. In that spiral these brands, these products and services, are compared on rational terms alone - price, performance, quantity - and the lowest cost manufacturer wins.

If the Brain Has Changed, Our Game Can't Remain the Same: Five Ways Brands Must Change

Dan Machen | Posted 02.11.2014 | UK Tech
Dan Machen

Concern over technology affecting our brains persists - and is getting louder and more dystopian... we are connected more, but retaining less - how many phone numbers can you recall now?