Dealing With Grief

The Things No One Tells You About Losing a Loved One

Andreea Groenendijk-Deveau | Posted 21.02.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Andreea Groenendijk-Deveau

My best friend, my ex-boyfriend of 5 years, passed away suddenly. I was stunned. And the experience of the two days leading up to the funeral made it all so much worse.

Living on The Edge

Mark Oborn | Posted 10.11.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Mark Oborn

The toughest thing is doing all this alone, not alone in the sense that there is no one around me, but alone in the sense that I'm not complete without Claire. We faced these trials in life together, it was always 'Mark and Claire' - that was how we lived.

Continuing the Good Fight for Dad

Anders Lorenzen | Posted 12.11.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Anders Lorenzen

At 34 years of age, I'm the eldest of the four kids he left behind and should feel privileged that I had him for the longest of all of us. But two weeks after his death and a week after his funeral, I am struggling to feel positive about anything at all.

Surviving the Death of My Wonderful Husband

Beth Phillips | Posted 24.09.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Beth Phillips

On 25 April 2013, shortly after his 39th birthday, Dunc went to his weekly game of football, and suffered a cardiac arrest. Prolonged attempts at resuscitation were unsuccessful. By 8pm, my gorgeous, dedicated, loving husband had died and I was officially a widow. Not just a widow, but a widow with two little boys at home.

Living The Life

Hilary Robinson | Posted 07.07.2012 | UK Lifestyle
Hilary Robinson

"Grief feels like fear" - wrote C. S. Lewis and when my phone rang one morning three years ago, I knew instinctively that something was wrong. My daughter's best friend had gone missing from school the day before so when the Head of Pastoral Care told me that Naomi had died I was shocked, but not surprised. She had committed suicide. She was just 17.

Mass Hysteria at Kim Jong Il's Death - Normal Vs Abnormal Grief

Dr. Sohom Das | Posted 28.02.2012 | UK Lifestyle
Dr. Sohom Das

In psychiatry, we make a distinction between "normal" grief and "abnormal" grief. The latter condition has other aliases such as "pathological grief" or "morbid grief". Should psychiatrists meddle in such a natural human reaction?