Developing Countries

One Year On - Still Waiting For Tax

Simon Kirkland | Posted 07.07.2017 | UK Politics
Simon Kirkland

They say that a week is a long time in politics. But recently it feels like a day is enough to change almost anything. And if it is true that a political week is a long time, then right now a year feels like a very very long time indeed.

No One Should Have To Choose Between Educating Their Kids Or Having Access To Medicine

Isabel Torres | Posted 01.06.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Isabel Torres

Isabel Torres has worked in the pharmaceutical industry for nearly 20 years and is the Global Head of Access to Medicine at Takeda Pharmaceuticals. Last week, Takeda hosted the 'Blueprint for Success' summit in Geneva - bringing together experts from government, industry, NGOs, foundations, academia, finance and the wider business world to explore how new partnerships and innovation can improve access to medicine for patients around the world.

Cancer Taught Me To Love Sunsets

Jheric Delos Angeles | Posted 01.06.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Jheric Delos Angeles

I had started out experiencing back pain, feeling very weak and losing weight. Then after four months I was diagnosed with anaphylastic large-cell lymphoma - it's a rare type of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. I discovered that the cancer had already progressed to my abdomen, my spine and my lungs.

When Is A Bargain Too Good To Be True?

Michael Gidney | Posted 28.02.2017 | UK
Michael Gidney

We depend on these people, and they depend on trade with us. They deserve a fair deal for their hard work. We mustn't allow exploitation, child labour or poverty pay to continue. We must demand greater transparency from companies.

Developing Countries Are Ill-Equipped To Manage The Growing Chronic-Disease Burden

Martin Koehring | Posted 26.01.2017 | UK Tech
Martin Koehring

Meanwhile, technological and organisational innovations as well as sustained, co-ordinated efforts across multiple stakeholders are required. The healthcare infrastructure developed to address Millennium Development Goals can be leveraged to face the NCD challenge.

One Dress

Lucy Tammam | Posted 22.11.2016 | UK Style
Lucy Tammam

How much power does one dress have? Image credit Justin Lambert The dress - a symbol of woman - oppression, femininity, frivolity.   In reality...

Orphanages Are Not A Holiday Destination: The Problem With Voluntourism and 'Poverty Porn'

Philip Ellis | Posted 05.09.2016 | UK
Philip Ellis

As the market research keeps telling us, millennials are all about experiences. And when it comes to life-enriching experiences, there's nothing more fulfilling than volunteering in an orphanage in a developing country, right? Fulfilling for the volunteer, maybe.

Is This a Turning Point for Neglected Tropical Diseases?

Dominic Haslam | Posted 11.06.2016 | UK
Dominic Haslam

We are calling for a post-2015 framework that is supported by ambitious financing commitments and mechanisms that will ensure those most affected by poverty, such as those living in communities at risk from NTDs, have dramatically improved access to basic services (health, education, water, sanitation and social protection), employment and livelihoods prospects and enjoy their political and civic rights.

Five Ways to Stop the Threat to Global Health From Climate Change

Jeremy Leggett | Posted 23.06.2016 | UK
Jeremy Leggett

The advent of a strong voice from the medical profession, in the push for a meaningful climate treaty at the Paris Climate Summit in December, is hugely welcome. It is part of a multi-sectoral mobilisation that is offering increasing hope around the world that humankind can see off the climate-change threat, and spin its collective response into a global renaissance.

Nitya Rajan

This Wearable Tech Is Actually Saving Lives

HuffingtonPost.com | Nitya Rajan | Posted 22.05.2015 | UK Tech

It would seem that we live in a world where we've come to rely on wearable technology for almost everything. There's an ever growing list of fitnes...

Secure Land Rights Are Crucial for Feeding Nine Billion People by 2050

Martin Koehring | Posted 18.04.2015 | UK
Martin Koehring

Feeding a growing global population of nine billion people by 2050 is one of the world's biggest challenges--especially in the context of rapid urbanisation, rising amounts of food waste and climate change. During one day of discussions senior executives from agribusiness, policymaking and the NGO community examined approaches to food and nutrition security.

Can Mobile Technology Help Teachers to Be More Effective?

Purna Kumar Shrestha | Posted 07.12.2014 | UK Tech
Purna  Kumar Shrestha

I believe that if children are to enjoy their right to an education they must be taught by teachers who are properly trained and supported. There is a pressing need to consider how best to train teachers - both new teachers and up-skilling the large numbers of currently unqualified and under-qualified teachers through in-service training.

When Impact Is More Important Than Invention

Gates Cambridge Scholars | Posted 03.09.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Gates Cambridge Scholars

Sometimes commercial viability of biomedical inventions or therapeutics exists only in developed countries, even though minor product optimisations could increase access to life-saving medical care in resource-limited settings through cost reduction and functionality additions.

What the Media Forgot to Tell You: Extreme Poverty Is on the Way Out

Hans Zomer | Posted 16.08.2014 | UK
Hans Zomer

We live in an age of mass media. Magazines, television, books, radio and social media provide us with a constant flow of information, news, entertainment and education. We now have access to information that previous generations could only dream of...

#ShakeYourPower: Turning Music Into Clean Energy

Sudha Kheterpal | Posted 11.08.2014 | UK Entertainment
Sudha Kheterpal

I'm a British Asian female percussionist and I've been playing on the pop music scene for over twenty years. I've toured with the likes of Faithless, The Spice Girls, and Dido and have been lucky enough to play some really big gigs. These shows require a huge amount of energy to run and also a huge amount of energy to give out as a performer on stage.

For the World's Poorest People, Cooking Is One of the Biggest Killers - We Can Change That

Baroness Featherstone | Posted 01.07.2014 | UK Politics
Baroness Featherstone

Of all the threats to life that people in the developing world face, it is astonishing that the simple act of cooking is one of the greatest dangers of them all. And the scale of the tragedy is enormous; nearly three billion people in the developing world cook food and heat their homes with firewood or charcoal on traditional cookstoves or open fires.

The Myth of Increasing Aid

Harry Brown | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Harry Brown

After two years of declining world aid, last Tuesday, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released new figures that demonstrated that aid had reached a record high in 2013 and increased by over 6.1%. In the face of what appears to be a gratifying headline, beneath the surface lies a far more depressing state of affairs.

mPowering Frontline Health Workers?

Lesley-Anne Long | Posted 25.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Lesley-Anne Long

Collaboration is and will continue to be vital to unlocking the health challenges facing our world today and technological innovation needs to serve frontline health workers, not the other way round. If we combine the capacity of mobile with deep understanding of the real needs of frontline health workers and the systems within which they work, a powerful force for change can be created.

It's Time to End Female Genital Mutilation

Richard C.W. Miller | Posted 07.04.2014 | UK
Richard C.W. Miller

Today is a day you've probably never heard of - The International Day of Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation. Talking about this difficult subject might make us uncomfortable, but we should feel more uncomfortable with doing nothing, because for millions of women and girls - an estimated 140 million in fact - uncomfortable doesn't come anywhere close to describing the physical and psychological trauma of having their genitals removed.

WTO in Bali: Anyone Would Think 440ppm Had Never Happened

Ruth Bergan | Posted 08.02.2014 | UK Politics
Ruth Bergan

Meanwhile, the US continues to subsidise its own agricultural sector for crops like corn, wheat and soy, all of which are exported, all of which are associated with climate change: monocropping and the depletion of soil nutrition, reduction of soil capacity as a carbon sink and use for feed for Greenhouse Gas intensive meat production.

Materials Are Key Challenge for Europe in Resource-Constrained World

Dirk Jan van den Berg | Posted 29.01.2014 | UK
Dirk Jan van den Berg

In the build up to February's European Council Summit on industrial competitiveness, Brussels is in the midst of a major policy review. Industrial strategy is the right topic for Europe to be debating and now is exactly the right time to address it...

Developing Countries Are Finding Innovative Solutions to Their Health Challenges

Allan Pamba | Posted 25.01.2014 | UK
Allan Pamba

Malawi might not spring to mind as a hot-bed of healthcare innovation. Neither might Bangladesh or Colombia. But that view is changing. All over developing countries, determined people are finding brilliant and creative solutions for long-standing problems. ..

Ensuring That Real Change on International Taxation Occurs - What Can G8 Achieve?

Dr Steve McCabe | Posted 16.08.2013 | UK
Dr Steve McCabe

The announcement that David Cameron has been able to negotiate an agreement with all of our overseas territories and Crown territories which will mean that they sign up to a 'clampdown' on tax avoidance should be good news.

Time for the Spotlight to Shine on Young Volunteers Who Are Helping, Not Hindering Developing Countries

Brian Rockliffe | Posted 09.07.2013 | UK
Brian Rockliffe

Volunteering itself isn't a bad thing, but as with most things there are good and bad examples of it. Examples of how young people can make a positive contribution to tackling poverty, which could guide them to choose the right opportunity to generate the right impact, are often overlooked.

The Injustice of Overpopulation

Chantal Lyons | Posted 12.04.2013 | UK
Chantal Lyons

Most population growth is happening in the developing world. The clue is in the name - many developing nations are on their way up. Endeavouring to curb population growth can only be a positive thing. Many of the actions we could take are intrinsically humanitarian in themselves.