Development

A Trip Down Ethical Memory Lane

Harriet Lamb | Posted 22.07.2014 | UK
Harriet Lamb

We all remember with horror the great-aunts who would exclaim: 'My how you have grown'. In my case, it was especially excruciating as it usually meant I'd grown out rather than up, unlike my tall siblings. Fast forward several years and suddenly we've all become that aunt. Before we know it, we find ourselves parroting the same words when children we haven't seen for a while, have suddenly shot up.

Tackling Tax and Saving Lives

Francis West | Posted 17.07.2014 | UK Politics
Francis West

With world champions Spain, the Netherlands and Chile in their World Cup group, it's fair to say that Australia were always going to struggle to make an impact in Brazil last month...

Who Is Really Paying the Price of Fighting in South Sudan?

Luol Deng | Posted 09.07.2014 | UK Sport
Luol Deng

I know what it's like to lose your childhood to war. When I was five and conflict raged in Sudan, my family and I were amongst the lucky ones to leave for Egypt. Four years later we were granted asylum in the United Kingdom. Inspired by legendary South Sudanese basketball player Manute Bol, my siblings and I took up basketball which helped us fit in. Like Manute, I was lucky enough to turn the sport I loved into a career as a professional NBA player in the United States.

The Girls On the Bus: The Road Ahead

Emily Graham | Posted 03.07.2014 | UK
Emily Graham

"When I have a family it will be totally different. I hope we will be able even to wash and do our laundry here at home. And when we will have the water point up here, that old water point can be used for the rice field, it would be good for tomato and onion growing, so there would be more food."

The Path to Better Education in Pakistan

Aaron Benavot | Posted 03.07.2014 | UK
Aaron Benavot

Improving quality in Pakistan would also be a huge breakthrough. In rural areas many primary schools lack sufficient classrooms to provide a proper five year cycle: In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, for example, more than half of the schools do not contain the requisite 5 classrooms (one per grade). If you were a parent, would you send your children to school, and keep them there, if school conditions meant that your children were unlikely to learn the basics?

2014: A Landmark Year for Disability and Development?

Dominic Haslam | Posted 30.06.2014 | UK
Dominic Haslam

The call for DFID to make concrete commitments to include people with disabilities has been growing over the last decade. 2014 marks the year where these calls have been heard. We look forward to working with DFID to ensure people with disabilities are at the heart of the decisions to come, the impact of which could change the lives of millions.

No Progress in Reducing Out of School Numbers, With Some Exceptions

Aaron Benavot | Posted 26.06.2014 | UK Politics
Aaron Benavot

As we consider the sorry state of international aid to education we must also remember that accessing school is also only part of the challenge; universal primary education goes beyond simply children enrolling in school - it also involves enabling them to complete their education and, as a result, acquire basic skills and knowledge...

Finding Bugs In The Garden Is Better Than Homework

Saskia Lee Stewart | Posted 24.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Saskia Lee Stewart

Do we want our young ones to grow up with strong and independent minds... or do we want them to be brainwashed by 'The Regime', ending up lacking control of who they are?

The Girls on the Bus: Solo's Story

Emily Graham | Posted 20.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Emily Graham

I collect water, and then I prepare our breakfast. It's hard collecting water before having breakfast but we need to have water for cooking. We have rice around 7am. We go early in the morning as our parents have to do other things, they are in a hurry to go to the field or do other work.

Aid to Education Has Fallen by 10% Since 2010

Aaron Benavot | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK Politics
Aaron Benavot

Humanitarian aid makes up only a small share of the external financing for education: The sector received only 2% of humanitarian appeals in 2013 - a long way from the modest 4% target set by the UN last year.

Meet Solo and Ze, the Girls on the Side of the Bus

Emily Graham | Posted 12.06.2014 | UK
Emily Graham

Some 748million people around the world do not have access to safe water. That is one person in 10. Around the world, it is nearly always up to girls and women to hike treacherous paths to fetch water and carry that heavy burden home to their families.

Climate-Proofing Kenya: From Trees to Technology

Dr. Abbas Gullet | Posted 02.06.2014 | UK
Dr. Abbas Gullet

The countries that will bear the brunt of climate change aren't waiting for others to get their acts together and cut emissions. We don't have that luxury because we're already living with the effects.

The Truth About Foreign Aid

Holly Alsop | Posted 02.06.2014 | UK
Holly Alsop

The aid and development sectors work hard to promote and maintain an air of importance and legitimacy, but there are some hard truths that we need to face if the industry is to grow and address the huge challenges we, as a global community, continue to come up against - climate change and the increased frequency of natural disasters, unhindered economic growth causing environmental and social deterioration and the rise of political fundamentalism, just to name a few.

Generation NCD: Searching For the Scientists to Tackle Africa's Next Healthcare Challenge

James Shannon | Posted 27.07.2014 | UK
James Shannon

Africa and its healthcare needs are changing. As its economic landscape shifts, burgeoning wealth co-exists with extreme poverty. While infectious diseases like malaria and HIV still place huge pressure on Africa, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer and diabetes pose an increasing threat.

Why Do We Ignore Disability in International Development?

James Thornberry | Posted 28.07.2014 | UK Politics
James Thornberry

Today the Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, made a speech in support of foreign aid. He defended Government spending in this area and reaffirmed the ...

Unpeeling the Impacts of Poverty

Harriet Lamb | Posted 28.07.2014 | UK
Harriet Lamb

Fairtrade is a large, complex work in progress. We have never claimed to tackle all the many injustices that grind down people living in poverty, or to have achieved trade nirvana balancing all of global trade's problems with a magic Mark...

We Must Shelve Our Hopes for Aid to Education From Australia

Manos Antoninis | Posted 21.07.2014 | UK
Manos Antoninis

The news that

How Does International Development Work? We Should Make the Effort to Find Out

Matt Daw | Posted 20.07.2014 | UK
Matt Daw

During a trip to Indonesia in 2012 I asked the staff of our local partner organisation about their experiences of the international effort in the aftermath of the 2004 tsunami. Their work in the region was prompted by the human need created by this event, however they were one of the few international NGOs to stay active in communities in Indonesia after the initial disaster relief effort...

How Can Conflict Affected Communities Improve Their Own Futures?

Madeleine McGivern | Posted 15.07.2014 | UK
Madeleine McGivern

The world is steadily becoming a less peaceful place, according to those who monitor levels of violence worldwide. The Global Peace Index produced by the Institute for Economics and Peace shows things have worsened steadily since 2008, while risk analysis firm Maplecroft said last week that levels of violence have risen significantly in 48 countries over the past six months...

FGC Not FGM

Geraldine Bedell | Posted 14.07.2014 | UK
Geraldine Bedell

There has been a reluctance on the part of Western governments to tackle FGM, for very good reasons. Intervention can be counter-productive, even when it comes from governments in the countries in which the practice is widespread. In Senegal in 1999, the government passed a law making the practice illegal. The following day, 100 girls in the region of Kedougou were cut in protest.

For the World's Poorest People, Cooking Is One of the Biggest Killers - We Can Change That

Lynne Featherstone | Posted 01.07.2014 | UK Politics
Lynne Featherstone

Of all the threats to life that people in the developing world face, it is astonishing that the simple act of cooking is one of the greatest dangers of them all. And the scale of the tragedy is enormous; nearly three billion people in the developing world cook food and heat their homes with firewood or charcoal on traditional cookstoves or open fires.

Three Simple Rules for Easy Parenting

Karen Pine | Posted 14.06.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Karen Pine

Research shows that adults who can delay gratification and regulate their behaviour are more likely to be high achievers. They're also the savers with long-term plans, quietly gloating over the live-it-up splurgers.

'If Obama Had a Dry Toilet...' - Building a Toilet for the 21st Century

Dr Kat Arney | Posted 12.06.2014 | UK Tech
Dr Kat Arney

Around the world 2.5 billion people have no access to a toilet, and 1,400 children die every single day as a result of unhygienic sanitation. These figures are as outrageous as they are shocking. But nobody wants to talk about it, because - well - it's just not very nice, is it?

The Myth of Increasing Aid

Harry Brown | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Harry Brown

After two years of declining world aid, last Tuesday, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released new figures that demonstrated that aid had reached a record high in 2013 and increased by over 6.1%. In the face of what appears to be a gratifying headline, beneath the surface lies a far more depressing state of affairs.

Unlocking the Potential of the World's One Billion People With Disabilities

Dominic Haslam | Posted 09.06.2014 | UK Politics
Dominic Haslam

Last week I heard that Lawrence, a young boy I met a while ago in Kenya, had passed his exams and scored in the top 25 per cent of children in the country. What is exceptional is that Lawrence is blind.