Development

Unleashing Africa's Data Revolutionaries

Dr. Álvaro Sobrinho | Posted 02.03.2015 | UK Tech
Dr. Álvaro Sobrinho

Through local partnerships and training programmes in rural villages, the project will develop a series of data collection and sharing platforms to improve yield and reduce food waste.

HIV and Gender-based Violence: What are the Costs of Inaction?

Jacqui Stevenson | Posted 10.02.2015 | UK
Jacqui Stevenson

Too often, the great promise of campaigns and programmes is lost or undermined when the funding ends and the funders move on, looking for the next innovation. Or a new issue comes along and takes the headlines, and with it donor attention and dollars.

2015: Setting the Right Course

Lord Michael Hastings | Posted 09.02.2015 | UK
Lord Michael Hastings

2015 gives me hope, but we need faith in the political system, in businesses, in civil society and in the people running them to ensure that the promise of the SDGs is fulfilled and the global economy works for all communities, now and in the future.

Time to Look Ahead on Ebola

Barbara Frost | Posted 30.01.2015 | UK
Barbara Frost

As the Ebola crisis in West Africa begins to ease, there is equal cause for hope and fear. The news that infections have slowed to fewer than 100 new cases per week is cause for optimism. But as the fight against Ebola moves into this next stage, there is still so much work to be done.

You Can Help Change and Save Thousands of Lives by Improving Healthcare for Communities Across Africa

Lenny Henry | Posted 29.01.2015 | UK Entertainment
Lenny Henry

Enough is enough though. This Red Nose Day, we want to help change and save thousands of lives by improving healthcare for communities across Africa. By combining your cash with local talent and determination we can make a huge difference and to demonstrate that we're going to follow the refurbishment of Iyolwa clinic by working with Ugandans like Gonza, a local architect who has come forward to lend his skills. Your support will not only help to refurbish this clinic, but will also help to improve healthcare for thousands of people in communities across Africa...

Five Resolutions to Make 2015 a Game-changing Year for Global Health

Allan Pamba | Posted 23.01.2015 | UK
Allan Pamba

Nobody can yet comprehend the legacy that the current Ebola outbreak will leave. But that should galvanise us into action - it shows why 2015 must be the year to strengthen health systems and support innovative solutions that secure healthier lives and livelihoods.

Syria: A Third Space

Graham Sheffield | Posted 21.01.2015 | UK
Graham Sheffield

Culture is often seen as marginal to the development process, outside the mainstream of economic, political and social policy debates. Or it is offered as an appendage to them, often invoked to explain the failure of well-meaning development interventions.

This Really Is New Africa (T.R.I.N.A)

Inez Sarkodee-Adoo | Posted 17.01.2015 | UK Universities & Education
Inez Sarkodee-Adoo

Africa does not need 'saving' as is conventionally assumed, however I envisage a truly collaborative effort from passionate, enlightened and courageous visionaries of all backgrounds as necessary to counter centuries of institutional marginalisation.

Ebola Outbreak: Focus on Response, Don't Forget Long-term Recovery and Learn Lessons For the Future

Richard C.W. Miller | Posted 27.12.2014 | UK
Richard C.W. Miller

Ebola presents an unprecedented threat to Sierra Leone and other countries in West Africa, not just in terms of public health but also because of the outbreak's long-term social and economic impacts. The UK has taken the global lead in supporting the response and has committed significant resources. This recognises Britain's long standing links with Sierra Leone and ActionAid welcomes and fully supports this.

With Food as a Common Denominator, an American Is Welcomed in Iran

Professor Sir Gordon Conway | Posted 02.12.2014 | UK
Professor Sir Gordon Conway

Farmers have little to cheer about; politicians even less. But, when an American can evoke an explosion of applause from Iran's most elite agricultural researchers at the suggestion that all of mankind is capable of standing together to address common challenges, the possibilities for a more peaceful world becomes limitless.

Values - Die Inside and Out or Develop Your Love and Business

Anna Roth | Posted 26.11.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Anna Roth

Ask yourself: Do you want lead a life that makes you die inside and out? Or do you want to grow and develop your love of life and a business that's full of joy? Like Sir Richard Branson mentioned, 'I don't think of work as work and play as play. It's all living'.

Closing the Gap for Post-2015: New Ambition for Acute Malnutrition

Sabrina de Souza | Posted 24.11.2014 | UK
Sabrina de Souza

Nutrition is both a maker and marker of development. Yet, undernutrition continues to hamper the ability of children to live happy, healthy lives and reach their full potential. Millions of children - 52 million to be exact - suffer from acute malnutrition.

The Quantified Self

Paul Lees | Posted 08.11.2014 | UK Tech
Paul Lees

It is not a particularly new concept for one to want to track their performance and development when it comes to certain activities but the ability to be able to this is quickly picking up pace due to the ongoing development of Quantified Self.

Regardless of GCSE Results There's Now a Real Opportunity for Educational Reform

Charlie Rigby | Posted 26.10.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Charlie Rigby

GCSE results alone provide a narrow and confusing measure of success with no real consideration of the overall benefits to children of their time at school... under new Education Secretary Nicky Morgan, there is a real opportunity to take an approach which not only provides a strong academic grounding but also instils character values in students.

A Trip Down Ethical Memory Lane

Harriet Lamb | Posted 20.09.2014 | UK
Harriet Lamb

We all remember with horror the great-aunts who would exclaim: 'My how you have grown'. In my case, it was especially excruciating as it usually meant I'd grown out rather than up, unlike my tall siblings. Fast forward several years and suddenly we've all become that aunt. Before we know it, we find ourselves parroting the same words when children we haven't seen for a while, have suddenly shot up.

Tackling Tax and Saving Lives

Francis West | Posted 16.09.2014 | UK Politics
Francis West

With world champions Spain, the Netherlands and Chile in their World Cup group, it's fair to say that Australia were always going to struggle to make an impact in Brazil last month...

Who Is Really Paying the Price of Fighting in South Sudan?

Luol Deng | Posted 08.09.2014 | UK Sport
Luol Deng

I know what it's like to lose your childhood to war. When I was five and conflict raged in Sudan, my family and I were amongst the lucky ones to leave for Egypt. Four years later we were granted asylum in the United Kingdom. Inspired by legendary South Sudanese basketball player Manute Bol, my siblings and I took up basketball which helped us fit in. Like Manute, I was lucky enough to turn the sport I loved into a career as a professional NBA player in the United States.

The Girls On the Bus: The Road Ahead

Emily Graham | Posted 02.09.2014 | UK
Emily Graham

"When I have a family it will be totally different. I hope we will be able even to wash and do our laundry here at home. And when we will have the water point up here, that old water point can be used for the rice field, it would be good for tomato and onion growing, so there would be more food."

The Path to Better Education in Pakistan

Aaron Benavot | Posted 02.09.2014 | UK
Aaron Benavot

Improving quality in Pakistan would also be a huge breakthrough. In rural areas many primary schools lack sufficient classrooms to provide a proper five year cycle: In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, for example, more than half of the schools do not contain the requisite 5 classrooms (one per grade). If you were a parent, would you send your children to school, and keep them there, if school conditions meant that your children were unlikely to learn the basics?

2014: A Landmark Year for Disability and Development?

Dominic Haslam | Posted 27.08.2014 | UK
Dominic Haslam

The call for DFID to make concrete commitments to include people with disabilities has been growing over the last decade. 2014 marks the year where these calls have been heard. We look forward to working with DFID to ensure people with disabilities are at the heart of the decisions to come, the impact of which could change the lives of millions.

No Progress in Reducing Out of School Numbers, With Some Exceptions

Aaron Benavot | Posted 25.08.2014 | UK Politics
Aaron Benavot

As we consider the sorry state of international aid to education we must also remember that accessing school is also only part of the challenge; universal primary education goes beyond simply children enrolling in school - it also involves enabling them to complete their education and, as a result, acquire basic skills and knowledge...

Finding Bugs In The Garden Is Better Than Homework

Saskia Lee Stewart | Posted 24.08.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Saskia Lee Stewart

Do we want our young ones to grow up with strong and independent minds... or do we want them to be brainwashed by 'The Regime', ending up lacking control of who they are?

The Girls on the Bus: Solo's Story

Emily Graham | Posted 19.08.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Emily Graham

I collect water, and then I prepare our breakfast. It's hard collecting water before having breakfast but we need to have water for cooking. We have rice around 7am. We go early in the morning as our parents have to do other things, they are in a hurry to go to the field or do other work.

Aid to Education Has Fallen by 10% Since 2010

Aaron Benavot | Posted 10.08.2014 | UK Politics
Aaron Benavot

Humanitarian aid makes up only a small share of the external financing for education: The sector received only 2% of humanitarian appeals in 2013 - a long way from the modest 4% target set by the UN last year.

Meet Solo and Ze, the Girls on the Side of the Bus

Emily Graham | Posted 12.08.2014 | UK
Emily Graham

Some 748million people around the world do not have access to safe water. That is one person in 10. Around the world, it is nearly always up to girls and women to hike treacherous paths to fetch water and carry that heavy burden home to their families.