Dopamine

Eight Ways to Guarantee You'll Be Miserable

Frederika Roberts | Posted 09.06.2016 | UK Lifestyle
Frederika Roberts

Are you fed up with being surrounded by happy, smiley people? Do you want to bring more misery, stress, anxiety and depression into your life and the lives of your loved ones? Then here is your handy guide.

How Technology Ruins Your Love Life and What to Do About It

Anastasia Dedyukhina | Posted 14.02.2016 | UK Lifestyle
Anastasia Dedyukhina

An appalling 75% of women say that their digital devices ruin their relationships and intimacy. Conflicts within the couples, higher rates of depression and lower life satisfaction is the price we pay for staying connected all the time. Alarmingly, younger people are even more likely to report tension in their relationships over technology use.

How Knitting Could Benefit Your Health: Including Helping Depression, Memory Loss And Anxiety

The Huffington Post UK | Rachel Moss | Posted 26.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle

Not only does knitting allow us to make cute beanies and chunky jumpers, the pastime can have a beneficial affect on our health and help to tackle str...

Dopamine: The False Promise of Reward

Clark Russell | Posted 16.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Clark Russell

The problem is modern day stimuli like alcohol, drugs, stress, sleep deprivation actually impair this sensitive part of the brain to the extent where it mimics actual brain damage, albeit temporary. This can impair our ability to think rationally and make the correct decisions to reach our long term goals.

Is Your Dopamine in the Driving Seat?

Beth Burgess | Posted 22.10.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Beth Burgess

A brain chemical called dopamine may be responsible for more of your choices than you think. This much-misunderstood neurotransmitter, whose original function was to ensure our survival, has been somewhat hijacked by the modern world, meaning that more of us are likely to fall prey to addiction and other unwanted behaviours.

Why Romney Lost the Debate - Anxiety and Choking

Professor Ian Robertson | Posted 16.12.2012 | UK Politics
Professor Ian Robertson

It strikes me - this is an impression not a scientific conclusion - that Obama wants to be president less desperately than does Romney.