Ealing Studios

Back on Track: The Titfield Thunderbolt (1953)

Susannah Straughan | Posted 11.03.2013 | UK Entertainment
Susannah Straughan

Released four years earlier, Ealing's first colour film is an unabashed celebration of post-war optimism, community spirit, the glories of rural England, and the romance of the railways.

The Man in the White Suit (1951)

Susannah Straughan | Posted 13.01.2013 | UK Entertainment
Susannah Straughan

"Why can't you scientists leave things alone?" Cinema in the 1950s often focused on the dangers caused by experiments that went horribly wrong. But Ealing's The Man in the White Suit isn't a sci-fi movie about marauding giant ants, or a cautionary tale about the nuclear arms race.

Why Revisit Ealing Studios?

Dr Keith M. Johnston | Posted 31.12.2012 | UK Entertainment
Dr Keith M. Johnston

This week, BFI Palgrave MacMillan release Ealing Revisited, a new collection of essays on what is, arguably, the most iconic and best loved studio in British cinema history.

Cinema in Ealing: Will the Tragedy Finally Return to Comedy?

Mark Hillary | Posted 25.12.2012 | UK Entertainment
Mark Hillary

It's a tragedy that Ealing has no cinema of its own, as this is the neighbourhood of London that has created some of the most treasured British films.

The Great Ealing Film Challenge 95: Passport to Pimlico (1949)

Dr Keith M. Johnston | Posted 20.10.2012 | UK Entertainment
Dr Keith M. Johnston

And so, it came to an end. Not with a whimper, but with a bang: Passport to Pimlico, one of the best known 'Ealing comedies', one of the films that (it is claimed) speaks for the whole of the studio's output and thematic interests, and one of the films that first sparked my love of Ealing many years ago.

The Great Ealing Film Challenge 94: Nowhere to Go (1958)

Dr Keith M. Johnston | Posted 19.10.2012 | UK Entertainment
Dr Keith M. Johnston

Nowhere to Go was the second-last Ealing film produced and, suitably, is also the second-last film to be viewed and written about for this challenge.

The Great Ealing Film Challenge 92: His Excellency (1952)

Dr Keith M. Johnston | Posted 12.10.2012 | UK Entertainment
Dr Keith M. Johnston

His Excellency is one of those films that is difficult to love, partly because it often fails to deliver a coherent experience or meaning: it has moments of jingoism and anti-foreigner attitudes that feel alien to a 21st century audience, yet also goes to great pains to mock the British patriarchal attitude to 'the colonies'; it mocks socialism yet offers a partial celebration of unionism and collective action; ridicules military might but ultimately relies on it to resolve narrative issues; celebrates a particular 'northern' personality within Britain but dilutes that through the imposition of upper class knowledge and restraint.

The Great Ealing Film Challenge 91: The Divided Heart (1954)

Dr Keith M. Johnston | Posted 09.10.2012 | UK Entertainment
Dr Keith M. Johnston

The idea that the mother-child relationship was a recurring one in Ealing might seem a strange observation, even coming from the man who ran the studio between 1938 and 1959.

The Great Ealing Film Challenge 90: Mandy (1952)

Dr Keith M. Johnston | Posted 08.10.2012 | UK Entertainment
Dr Keith M. Johnston

Mandy is a film that can be defined in various ways.

The Great Ealing Film Challenge 47: The Goose Steps Out (1942)

Dr Keith M. Johnston | Posted 27.04.2012 | UK Entertainment
Dr Keith M. Johnston

When British Military Intelligence realise William Potts (Will Hay) is the double of German spy Mueller, Potts reluctantly agrees to take on Mueller's identity and position at the German university where inventor Professor Hoffman (Frank Pettingell) is working on a secret new bomb.