UK History

Critiquing Islam or Islamophobia?

Liam Deacon | Posted 16.05.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Liam Deacon

For nine years in a row a controversial resolution on, "Combating Defamation of Religions," described by some as an, "international blasphemy law," has been consistently losing support in the United Nations General Assembly.

Should Prince William Destroy the Royal Ivory?

Philip Mansbridge | Posted 19.05.2014 | UK
Philip Mansbridge

The truth is that destroying works of art and trying to erase history isn't the answer... in itself. We cannot and should not attempt to erase history. What has happened has happened, but what is important is that we learn from history, use it to better ourselves, use it to remedy the issues that once presented themselves and that once burdened us and tarnished our names.

20 Things Only History Students Will Understand

The Huffington Post UK | Cristina Criddle | Posted 19.03.2014 | UK Universities & Education

History students are an interesting breed. Toeing the line between art and social science, these budding academics go crazy for anything which can be ...

My Own Paralympic Legacy or How Poor Access Can Kill

Mik Scarlet | Posted 15.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Mik Scarlet

Better access for disabled people benefits everyone. I wonder how many of you have tripped while walking over cobbles or uneven Yorkstones? Now imagine what it would feel like if that injury might threaten your life... all in the name of liking old things!

Connecting People to Their Past

Richard Gibby | Posted 12.05.2014 | UK
Richard Gibby

People are increasingly interested in exploring their roots: where they come from, stories from their family history, who they are related to, what their place in the world is. But would you know how to research your past, if you wanted to? Would you know where to turn online, other than Google, or an online genealogy website?

The Third World Fallacy: What It Really Means to Be From a Third World Country

Awoowe Hamza | Posted 13.05.2014 | UK
Awoowe Hamza

If you're expecting me to paint a picture of the struggles of those from developing countries to reinforce the first thought of an Aid commercial showing a young child that came to mind when you read the words 'Third World', then I am sorry to disappoint you.

Why Women Really Cheat - The Darker Side of the Fairer Sex!

Martyn Stewart | Posted 01.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Martyn Stewart

If you follow the stereotypical notion that female patterns of behaviour will be laced with emotion, attention-seeking, revenge, the need for an upgrade (women rarely downgrade), malice, anger and idealism; all nicely concealed in a cloak of invisibility that would make Harry potter jealous then we may uncover something phenomenal.

About Soho

Tom Harvey | Posted 29.04.2014 | UK
Tom Harvey

From the early Huguenot crafts people to the celluloid film industry to today's global successes in digital effects, fashion, music and theatre, Soho remains an extraordinary place to live and work. If you're at all creative, then it's probably the best place to work in the world.

British Ghost Towns

Paul Anthony Jones | Posted 26.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Paul Anthony Jones

It's tempting to think of ghost towns as nothing more than a cliché of horror films or a stereotypical image of the American Wild West, but in fact abandoned towns and villages that have simply dropped off the map can be found much closer to home than that.

The Value in Being Multidimensional in Your Genealogy

Scott Phillips | Posted 25.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Scott Phillips

Working on one's genealogy and family history is often quite like the proverbial saying about the forest and its trees. If your focus is set on finding just one detail, you might miss many others. Likewise if your approach is too scattered you risk missing an important detail, or more.

The Power of Popular History

Alex Davis | Posted 23.04.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Alex Davis

Though examples of popular history range from magazines such as History Today right through to the work of the National Trust, it is the film industry that has recently encapsulated the imaginations of thousands of ordinary people.

University Students Make History With West-End Debut

Abigail Poulton | Posted 21.04.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Abigail Poulton

London College of Music, final year Musical Theatre students, attempt their biggest feat yet; staging a brand new musical in the heart of the West-End. 'Bel-Ami, by Alex Loveless, opens this evening at the Charing Cross Theatre. I can already sense the growing nerves as the Dress-run ends and the performers begin to prepare for their world premiere.

Five Ways to Pay It Forward in Genealogy

Scott Phillips | Posted 20.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Scott Phillips

The genealogy community is, by and large, a very sociable, caring, and sharing one. While we all enjoy the vast amounts of materials that are out there for us to access electronically (so free and some not-so-free) it is important to remember that we, as genealogists, each need to pay-it-forward every so often.

Blaze At Home Of UK's Most Precious Historical Documents

PA/The Huffington Post UK | Posted 15.02.2014 | UK

Firefighters have tackled a blaze at the National Archives, home to some of the UK's most important historical documents. London Fire Brigade said ...

If Cleopatra and Elvis Had Twitter, This Is What They Would Post

Danielle Osman | Posted 15.04.2014 | UK Tech
Danielle Osman

Following a recent social media debate held for young people at ITV studios on Southbank, social media stereotypes have been playing on my mind.

Combating Cultural Femicide: Founding Room of our Own, A Feminist/ Womanist Network

Louise Pennington | Posted 04.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Louise Pennington

I have created the blogging network A Room of our own: A Feminist/ Womanist Network as a way to combat cultural femicide. The network is collecting, archiving and sharing women's writings, art, music, photography and any other medium of expression that can be posted online.

When It Rains

Jacob Greaves | Posted 01.04.2014 | UK Politics
Jacob Greaves

Russian independent broadcaster TV Dozhd, meaning TV Rain, is under fire after publishing a poll asking whether Leningrad- now St Petersburg- should have been allowed to fall into Nazi hands.

10 Things We Know Because They Were Put Down on Paper

Christian Toon | Posted 30.03.2014 | UK Tech
Christian Toon

On Data Protection Day, we mark the importance of preserving and extracting value from information with a list of ten things we only know because the paper records were protected.

When I Was a Handicapped Kid

Simon Stevens | Posted 30.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Simon Stevens

The teachers were as shocked as the pupils and I might as well have been an alien for outer space as I was certainly the freak of the school. This was clearly a lonely position and I often felt I was the only disabled person within a mile, five miles or even ten miles radius.

Ghent - A Medieval Gem With a Lively Culinary Scene

Peter Morrell | Posted 30.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Peter Morrell

After a poignant two days visiting the World War 1 battlefields in Flanders I took 24 hours out in Ghent to soak up the culture, cuisine and atmosphere of this beautifully preserved medieval city.

Words on the Holocaust

Josh Zitser | Posted 28.03.2014 | UK
Josh Zitser

Whatever you do, remember that the theme of this year's Holocaust Memorial Day is 'journeys'. Journeys are about getting from one place to another. If we truly want to honour the lives of all those who suffered under the Nazi regime, it is our duty to ensure that we, as a society, take note of our starting point and make sure that we move forward to a more promising final destination.

Has King Alfred the Great's Skeleton Been Found In A Discarded Box?

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 25.01.2014 | UK

Historians believe they may have found one of the nation's "great" kings. The bones of King Alfred the Great or his son, Edward the Elder, are beli...

An Anne Boleyn for a Post-Modern Generation

Amy Licence | Posted 17.03.2014 | UK Entertainment
Amy Licence

By her own confession, philosopher Susan Bordo is obsessed with Anne Boleyn. The very cover of her new book alerts the reader to the fact they are about to experience something more than straightforward history.

The Bible for Non-religious People, Part Three: A Unique Connection Point

Ben Whitnall | Posted 08.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Ben Whitnall

When my grandad passed away and my nan was clearing out some of his things, I borrowed one of his old diaries. I had always loved listening to what he had to say; he was full of warmth and wisdom, and I wanted to hear more of his words, even if they were written before I was born.

'Stress and the Strain': Personal Memories, National Narratives, and the First World War

Jamie Andrews | Posted 10.03.2014 | UK
Jamie Andrews

My granddad died a year ago. We've been clearing out his papers. Like so many men of his generation (he was born in 1921), his early adult life was cut around the events of the Second World War. And, like many of his generation, his was not the first experience of war-service in the family. Amongst the papers he left, we also came across documents and letters about his own father's service in what became the First World War...