Lyrics

Writing About Music

Charlotte Ballantyne | Posted 10.12.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Charlotte Ballantyne

Why did we feel the need to set our words to music? Why not just write poetry? Music has existed for hundreds of years (with and without lyrics!), so it clearly appeals to the human race. Who among us doesn't listen to music in some way every single day? What is it about music that we enjoy so much? And how do I go about trying to explain this?

The Ten Songs That Changed My Life

Caroline Feraday | Posted 13.03.2014 | UK Entertainment
Caroline Feraday

There is music which crosses your path, and totally changes the direction you take. Maybe it was playing at the moment you took a certain fork in the road, like a soundtrack to your life, or maybe they were the motivation for the decision. I have ten such songs.

WATCH: Hugh Laurie Answers Questions Posed By Pop Lyrics

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 30.08.2013 | UK Comedy

In which one of our favourite exports (Hugh Laurie) answers questions posed by some of our favourite philosophers (Sheryl Crow, Fergie, the Beach Boys...

Music and the English Language: I Don't Mean to Sound Slutty, but Please use Me Whenever You Want. Sincerely, Grammar

Matthew Phillips | Posted 25.12.2012 | UK Entertainment
Matthew Phillips

What vexes me most is not that these artists are indolently committing crimes against the English language, but that they are wasting a hallowed opportunity. Words add depth, colour and personality to a song. In fact, they become even more powerful when projected onto a musical backdrop, which is why I shudder when lyricists make a conscious decision to rhyme nonsensical syllables.

WATCH: Prankster Speaks To Strangers Entirely In Song Lyrics

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 01.10.2012 | UK Comedy

Our favourite prank of the week so far comes courtesy of US talk show host Ellen DeGeneres who sent one of her writers off to the supermarket to appro...

Mike Skinner Leaks Details Of New Streets Memoir

Posted 05.03.2012 | Home

From the man once embarrassingly dubbed ‘Shakespeare for clubbers’, a book should be an exciting prospect. Unfortunately, Skinner devotees hopi...