UK Philosophy

The Absurd Death of Albert Camus

Ioan Marc Jones | Posted 06.08.2014 | UK Entertainment
Ioan Marc Jones

On the 4th of January, 1960, at the age of forty six, Camus had planned to take a train back to Paris after a Christmas holiday with his wife and kids. At the last minute, Camus changed his mind and decided to travel instead with his publisher Michel Gallimard. During the journey, Gallimard's car slipped off the icy roads and smashed into a tree, immediately killing Camus.

Thinking Management Philosophically

Ken Starkey | Posted 31.07.2014 | UK
Ken Starkey

Books on philosophy and management have proliferated in recent years, but with very different aims and perspectives. Philosophy books tend to be consu...

Five Reasons Why the Assisted Dying Bill is Long Overdue

Kieran Turner-Dave | Posted 17.07.2014 | UK Politics
Kieran Turner-Dave

The Assisted Dying Bill is long overdue because we can't keep forcing people to die in pain and misery against their will, or pressuring the terminally ill into committing gruesome acts of suicide as a last resort. We must realise that the right to life includes the right for individuals to make an informed decision to die in the way that they perceive to be the most dignified.

Platonic Morality in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit

Ioan Marc Jones | Posted 16.07.2014 | UK Entertainment
Ioan Marc Jones

Around the fourth century B.C. - in the Gregorian rather than the Middle-earth calendar - Plato and a couple of wise old friends pondered the formation of ethics.

Carpe Diem

Jason Bartholomew | Posted 14.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Jason Bartholomew

Each of us has grieved or will grieve in our lives at some point: a tragic death of a spouse; an unthinkable loss of a child; the memory of a lost friend - humanity inevitably will rob us of someone we love. It is at those poignant moments when we will stop and notice time itself.

Humans Would Rather Electrocute Themselves Than Spend Time Alone

The Huffington Post UK | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 04.07.2014 | UK Tech

So it turns out we really hate spending time with our own thoughts, so much so in fact that we'd rather send electric shocks through out bodies than d...

Assisted Dying and Religion

Bob Morgan | Posted 03.07.2014 | UK
Bob Morgan

I support the idea of the patient having the option to ask for a lethal dose of drugs to end that suffering - at least that is what I would like to have as an option should I find myself in that position.

A New Word, and a New Philosophy

Carla Buzasi | Posted 27.08.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Carla Buzasi

I learnt a new word during a yoga class this week: 'Yama'. Devoted yogis will probably point out that it's hardly a new word, having been around for centuries and centuries, but I'm an occasional yogi, and it's been going round and round in my head ever since. According to the yoga teacher who introduced me to it, Yama means not pushing yourself too far. In a world when we're constantly told to strive for more, to push our limits and test our boundaries, the idea of it being ok - and not just ok, but actually wonderful - to find a comfortable spot and just sit there for a while resonated.

Living With Mortality: The Legacy of Cancer

Jane Sarluis | Posted 29.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Jane Sarluis

Oncology season is approaching again. Next month, I will arrive with sweaty palms and dry mouth at the hospital which summons supressed fear the moment the A-road heralds the big 'H' signpost.

Evolution Doesn't Make Life Meaningless

Gates Cambridge Scholars | Posted 23.07.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Gates Cambridge Scholars

Recognising the role of evolution and having a meaningful life are not mutually exclusive, and learning about the origins of our species should not strip modern people of our sense of meaning and significance, wherever we derive it from. At the very least, it should make us thankful that nature and evolution have instilled us with brains that let us even contemplate meaning at all.

Science and Reality - Is Science Really Real?

Tony Sobrado | Posted 21.07.2014 | UK
Tony Sobrado

We live in a world where science prevails. After all who would argue with it, science has given us computers and planes. On the path to reality many o...

Library as Church, Bookshelf as Altar: Why I Gave Up Praying, and Carried on Reading

Kester Brewin | Posted 08.07.2014 | UK
Kester Brewin

Around 18 months ago my best friend died of cancer. He was early 40s, and left a wife and twins. Like me 'the son of a preacher man,' we'd collaborated together on projects exploring the outer edges of what our faith was becoming.

Why Philosophy Is Still Relevant - And Has Useful Applications

Alexander Leivesley | Posted 04.07.2014 | UK
Alexander Leivesley

To a great number of people, philosophy has become obsolete; to others it's mind-numbingly boring; to others it's incredibly confusing and too hard a subject to get around. The latter two may certainly be correct, depending on your own opinion; however the first one, the idea that philosophy has lost its purpose, most certainly isn't.

Márquez: A Master of the Minutiae and the Magnitude of Existence

Luke Massey | Posted 23.06.2014 | UK Entertainment
Luke Massey

Reading Gabriel García Márquez is like being immersed in the letters of a sage and eccentric old friend: honest, inspiring, and personal. To try to...

How To Look Good Dead

Rory Fenton | Posted 19.06.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Rory Fenton

I was told once that the best way to know a city is to get lost in it. I can't say if this is a universal truth but with my truly terrible sense of direction I've had plenty of chances to put it to the test. It was just this Monday that I made my favourite finding to date.

Obscurity Is the Enemy of Philosophy

Joseph Miles | Posted 04.06.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Joseph Miles

Scientists have gone out into the world at large away from the comforts of academia to justify what they are doing since the dawn of scientific practice itself. It is about time that philosophers did the same.

Why Does Anything Exist at All and the Problems of Necessity and Probability

Tony Sobrado | Posted 27.05.2014 | UK
Tony Sobrado

Why does anything exist at all? Or to put it another way "Why is there something rather than nothing?" Or to put it another way still "Why this form of existence as opposed to another?" The three different ways of presenting this question demonstrates the complexity regarding the very notion of existence and the philosophical considerations that accompany it...

What We Can Learn About the Farage-Clegg Debate From a Concert Violinist Pretending to Be a Busker

Tony Koutsoumbos | Posted 28.05.2014 | UK Politics
Tony Koutsoumbos

We've learnt that just as understanding what constitutes a sublime piece of music is central to appreciating it anywhere, knowing what constitutes a good argument is vital to deciding whether Nick Clegg or Nigel Farage has made the better case for their position, regardless of how we personally feel about them or their politics.

The Political Grounding of American Christianity

Tony Sobrado | Posted 27.05.2014 | UK
Tony Sobrado

In a stunningly ironic way it is the political equivalent of survival of the fittest that seeks shelter under a religious cannon. The religious Americans have there ultimate dream cake and eat it: the pre-eminence of self-regard on this earth is the right thing to do for yourself, others and God and as a consequence you are spiritually rewarded for it in the afterlife.

Facebook Philanthropists

Liam Deacon | Posted 26.05.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Liam Deacon

I've had it. I refuse to sponsor one more person to go skydiving, travel across South America collecting pictures of themselves patting wretched children on the head or drive a car across Europe in the name of the environment.

Why We Need to Appreciate Our Own Aloneness

Mohadesa Najumi | Posted 17.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Mohadesa Najumi

Try out this experiment. Sit in your room for an hour and turn your phone/laptop off. Dispel any distractions, don't do anything, at all. Just sit there. What do you feel at the end of the hour? Aloneness? Sorrow? Or do you feel at peace, content and fulfilled by an hour of your own company?

Hanif Kureishi and the Philosophers' Stone

Catriona Luke | Posted 08.04.2014 | UK Entertainment
Catriona Luke

Kureishi's novel The Last Word shows that if you run the vernacular flotsam and jetsam of human experience on top of a structure of abstract philosophical thought, you may still effect change in society, by literary means.

Poorna Bell

The Philosopher's Mail: Alain De Botton Talks About His Positive Spin On The News

HuffingtonPost.com | Poorna Bell | Posted 03.02.2014 | UK Lifestyle

It has been dubbed the 'anti Daily Mail' but The Philosopher's Mail - which features celeb and crime stories but with a different twist - is a bit mor...

Tractors, Trolls and What a 1950's Philosopher Says About Twitter

Kester Brewin | Posted 25.03.2014 | UK Tech
Kester Brewin

There is rarely anything new under the sun. It's useful to remember this when there is great furore over new technologies and the effects they are having on us and the world we live in - especially when the stories are as serious as a teenager taking her life because of the 'toxic digital world' she had become so enmeshed in.

Anarchy From Within - How Germans Practise Free Love

Louisa Leontiades | Posted 08.02.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Louisa Leontiades

Even if 'Unity, Justice and Freedom' is considered the unofficial national motto, that's not what springs to mind when foreigners think of Germany. You might think immediately of their incredible organization, their love of rules and beautifully shameless attitude to sex.