UK Philosophy

Everything Happens For A Reason -You Decide What That Reason Is

Jojo Furnival | Posted 08.12.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Jojo Furnival

From the moment we arrive on this earth, we're looking for answers. "What does that do? ... What does this mean? Why are you doing that?" How often, though, do we get satisfactory, or even honest, answers?

Seeking Latin-Speaking Lover and A Perfect Day

Samantha van Dalen | Posted 06.12.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Samantha van Dalen

Two years ago I began learning Latin when I spied a grammar book on sale for 50p at my local train station (they do a recycling thing where second-hand books are sold for a small fee and the money goes to charity).

Got No Life Purpose? What's in an Aim...

Jojo Furnival | Posted 28.11.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Jojo Furnival

Hello again. Still super connected?! I thought so. It's funny. When you take the time to stop and think about your life, you might not like what realisations occur. What if, for example, answers to the questions 'what do I want?' 'what makes me happy?' 'what is my life's purpose?' remain unknown?

A Comedian's Perspective: Why I Reject The Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanic

Jay Cowle | Posted 13.11.2014 | UK Comedy
Jay Cowle

As humans we may see, imagine, and dream of other paths, other realities, but we can't take them. Our reality is a path of all things and the logic between them, we are not the dream creators, the world makers, but rather a cog, a pretty cog. A cog that likes cake.

We're So Connected Nowadays. Or Are We?

Jojo Furnival | Posted 07.11.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Jojo Furnival

As we sat in the middle of our mats, eyes closed, James asked us to picture our 7 year old selves sitting in front of us. And as we breathed our ujjayi breath (ocean breathing) with mouths open, each of us looked into the quizzical face of our 7 year old selves as they looked back and asked, 'How are we doing? How are we doing as an adult?'

The Terrifying Thing About #MillionMaskMarch is They Don't Know What They're Marching For

Sam Fowles | Posted 07.11.2014 | UK Politics
Sam Fowles

Until we, as a society, change, not just the way we act but, the way we think, the disenchanted will have nowhere else to go but #MillionMaskMarch and Russell Brand - too culturally and intellectually blinkered to see that revolution may be the method, but it is never the solution.

The 'Selfie' Trend

Matthew Davies | Posted 03.11.2014 | UK Tech
Matthew Davies

According to recent theory, the trend of taking "selfies" is actually linked to mental health conditions, with a focus on an individuals obsession with looks and image. Studies have revealed that the majority of teenagers who are image and body conscious, have a compulsion to repeatedly take and post selfies across social media sites.

Routine Is Routine, Wherever You Are

Lizzie Davey | Posted 20.10.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Lizzie Davey

Characters of habit, they call us - whoever 'they' are. No matter how hard we try, we always seem to find ourselves falling into some kind of routine. It's comforting and, quite frankly, we often need it to stop us from going insane.

10 Problems Every Philosophy Student Faces

The Huffington Post UK | Gemma Joyce | Posted 13.10.2014 | UK Universities & Education

Philosophy students can have a tough time - from battling existential crises on a weekly basis to trying to convince others that their degree is actua...

Is it Time to Bury Capitalism?

Adam Hamdy | Posted 09.12.2014 | UK Politics
Adam Hamdy

If we are ever to have a hope of rebalancing the books, meeting the future costs of the NHS, and satisfying our pension liabilities we need to look beyond capitalism. It's served a fortunate few well, but it has failed the majority. It's time to bury it alongside socialism and look for a better successor to both.

Dieting and Atheism: Is Thin the New Chaste?

George P. Simmonds | Posted 16.11.2014 | UK Lifestyle
George P. Simmonds

And so the case remains that while one half of the world starves the other gladly packs on the pounds. The corpulent noble comes to mind, englutting a dining table laid out by servants a third his weight.

A Reluctantly Pessimistic Interpretation of Moby-Dick

Ioan Marc Jones | Posted 12.11.2014 | UK Entertainment
Ioan Marc Jones

Walter Benjamin once said that 'it is not books that live inside the reader, it is he who lives inside them.' The aforementioned Swansonian interpretation of Moby-Dick is utterly representative of the man...

The Absurd Death of Albert Camus

Ioan Marc Jones | Posted 05.10.2014 | UK Entertainment
Ioan Marc Jones

On the 4th of January, 1960, at the age of forty six, Camus had planned to take a train back to Paris after a Christmas holiday with his wife and kids. At the last minute, Camus changed his mind and decided to travel instead with his publisher Michel Gallimard. During the journey, Gallimard's car slipped off the icy roads and smashed into a tree, immediately killing Camus.

Thinking Management Philosophically

Ken Starkey | Posted 29.09.2014 | UK
Ken Starkey

Books on philosophy and management have proliferated in recent years, but with very different aims and perspectives. Philosophy books tend to be consu...

Five Reasons Why the Assisted Dying Bill is Long Overdue

Kieran Turner-Dave | Posted 16.09.2014 | UK Politics
Kieran Turner-Dave

The Assisted Dying Bill is long overdue because we can't keep forcing people to die in pain and misery against their will, or pressuring the terminally ill into committing gruesome acts of suicide as a last resort. We must realise that the right to life includes the right for individuals to make an informed decision to die in the way that they perceive to be the most dignified.

Platonic Morality in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit

Ioan Marc Jones | Posted 14.09.2014 | UK Entertainment
Ioan Marc Jones

Around the fourth century B.C. - in the Gregorian rather than the Middle-earth calendar - Plato and a couple of wise old friends pondered the formation of ethics.

Carpe Diem

Jason Bartholomew | Posted 10.09.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Jason Bartholomew

Each of us has grieved or will grieve in our lives at some point: a tragic death of a spouse; an unthinkable loss of a child; the memory of a lost friend - humanity inevitably will rob us of someone we love. It is at those poignant moments when we will stop and notice time itself.

Humans Would Rather Electrocute Themselves Than Spend Time Alone

The Huffington Post UK | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 04.07.2014 | UK Tech

So it turns out we really hate spending time with our own thoughts, so much so in fact that we'd rather send electric shocks through out bodies than d...

Assisted Dying and Religion

Bob Morgan | Posted 02.09.2014 | UK
Bob Morgan

I support the idea of the patient having the option to ask for a lethal dose of drugs to end that suffering - at least that is what I would like to have as an option should I find myself in that position.

A New Word, and a New Philosophy

Carla Buzasi | Posted 27.08.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Carla Buzasi

I learnt a new word during a yoga class this week: 'Yama'. Devoted yogis will probably point out that it's hardly a new word, having been around for centuries and centuries, but I'm an occasional yogi, and it's been going round and round in my head ever since. According to the yoga teacher who introduced me to it, Yama means not pushing yourself too far. In a world when we're constantly told to strive for more, to push our limits and test our boundaries, the idea of it being ok - and not just ok, but actually wonderful - to find a comfortable spot and just sit there for a while resonated.

Living With Mortality: The Legacy of Cancer

Jane Sarluis | Posted 29.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Jane Sarluis

Oncology season is approaching again. Next month, I will arrive with sweaty palms and dry mouth at the hospital which summons supressed fear the moment the A-road heralds the big 'H' signpost.

Evolution Doesn't Make Life Meaningless

Gates Cambridge Scholars | Posted 23.07.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Gates Cambridge Scholars

Recognising the role of evolution and having a meaningful life are not mutually exclusive, and learning about the origins of our species should not strip modern people of our sense of meaning and significance, wherever we derive it from. At the very least, it should make us thankful that nature and evolution have instilled us with brains that let us even contemplate meaning at all.

Science and Reality - Is Science Really Real?

Tony Sobrado | Posted 21.07.2014 | UK
Tony Sobrado

We live in a world where science prevails. After all who would argue with it, science has given us computers and planes. On the path to reality many o...

Library as Church, Bookshelf as Altar: Why I Gave Up Praying, and Carried on Reading

Kester Brewin | Posted 08.07.2014 | UK
Kester Brewin

Around 18 months ago my best friend died of cancer. He was early 40s, and left a wife and twins. Like me 'the son of a preacher man,' we'd collaborated together on projects exploring the outer edges of what our faith was becoming.

Why Philosophy Is Still Relevant - And Has Useful Applications

Alexander Leivesley | Posted 04.07.2014 | UK
Alexander Leivesley

To a great number of people, philosophy has become obsolete; to others it's mind-numbingly boring; to others it's incredibly confusing and too hard a subject to get around. The latter two may certainly be correct, depending on your own opinion; however the first one, the idea that philosophy has lost its purpose, most certainly isn't.