U.K. Press

The Internationalisation of Press

Barry Whyte | Posted 02.10.2014 | UK
Barry Whyte

Only in the past couple of years have the rise of digital networks really facilitated the internationalisation of press... Not only are consumers reading online newspapers in growing numbers, but interestingly, their primary online newspaper is increasingly likely to be based in a country other than their own.

Bias at the BBC

Sara Sheridan | Posted 30.08.2014 | UK Politics
Sara Sheridan

If you think this is only a Scottish issue, you'd be wrong. On 21st of June 50000 anti-austerity marchers hit the streets of London and the BBC didn't produce a single word about it. By contrast in 2011 a pro-Austerity march by the Tax Payers Alliance which totalled 350 people was covered in detail. It's not only our BBC that is at fault here - it's your BBC too.

Newspapers Lose Bid To Have Rival Press Regulation Charter

The Huffington Post UK/PA | Posted 01.05.2014 | UK

Newspapers and magazines have lost their bid to continue a legal battle over the rejection of their version of a Royal Charter to govern the regulatio...

Award Winning Student Newspaper in Funding Crisis

Leo Garbutt | Posted 24.05.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Leo Garbutt

Leeds Student is valued by students and is an asset to the reputation of both Leeds University Union and the University. Going forward, this must be recognised by the Union.

Mr. Cameron, It's End Violence Against Women Day

Stephanie Davies-Arai | Posted 24.01.2014 | UK Politics
Stephanie Davies-Arai

David Cameron understands the power of images over words in government policy such as the introduction of pictures of disease on cigarette packets, he knows how advertising works and he cannot feign ignorance of the daily conditioning impact of Page 3 and other similar sexualised images of women in the U.K. tabloids.

Constitutional Ransacking of British Journalism

The Conversation UK | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Politics
The Conversation UK

British journalism has been battered by an unrelenting power grab on the part of the country's political classes. The move to foist an "all-party agreed" infrastructure of regulation by Royal Charter underpinned by punitive statutory sanction is part of a pattern of attack.

Read All About It...(While You Still Can)

Emily Stacey | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Emily Stacey

The fact is that many journalists see regulation, whether self or statuary, as 'crossing the Rubicon' and an invasion into the historic traditions of the British free press. Statuary regulation conjured up by the government in the interests of the politicians? Not under our watch.

Was Anti-Semitism Lurking Behind the 'Daily Mail's Attack on Ralph Miliband?

Jonathan Romain | Posted 03.12.2013 | UK
Jonathan Romain

The Daily Mail's attack on Ralph Miliband is so preposterous that there must be a hidden motive behind it. But what? One is that it is based on anti-semitism. That would put the Mail in the same category as Hitler who defined a Jew as anyone with one Jewish grandparent - nothing to do with faith and purely according to their birth.

I Shouldn't Be Judged By My Father's Teenage Diaries, Says Son Of Adrian Mole

The Huffington Post UK | Andrea Mann | Posted 02.10.2013 | UK Comedy

The son of Adrian Mole has hit back at a newspaper after it printed extracts from his diaries which they claim prove he 'hated Britain'. The newspa...

There Is No Impasse - There Is a Process

Professor Brian Cathcart | Posted 15.11.2013 | UK Politics
Professor Brian Cathcart

Editors, we hear, are filing one by one through the door of Downing Street, bending the prime minister's ear about royal charters and press regulators. You must do something, they warn him, or there will be an impasse, a stalemate. They are wrong. There is no impasse; there is a process. Lord Justice Leveson foresaw that some editors and proprietors would stubbornly resist change and he made provision for this.

WATCH: John Oliver And The Daily Show Cover The Royal Baby

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 24.07.2013 | UK Comedy

"Finally, we have a member of the royal family that actually has an excuse for being a toothless, petulant, useless human being.” Yes, the only ...

Prof James Curran: 'We Want to Shrink the Media Moguls'

Joe Sandler Clarke | Posted 01.09.2013 | UK Universities & Education
Joe Sandler Clarke

The Media Reform Coalition are pressing for something Curran refers to as the "elephant in the room". A 15 percent cap on cross-media ownership, giving up 20 percent of any given news market to public service obligations, and in the case of the 15 percent threshold, diluting share ownership to further undermine the power of publishers.

Why the World of PR Is Changing

Alastair Campbell | Posted 27.08.2013 | UK Politics
Alastair Campbell

There has always been comms. There has always been public affairs. There has always been PR. There has always been spin. Read the bible for heaven's sake. What is new is not spin but the reality of a globalized media age, an information economy, a world where technology is accelerating the pace of change on an exponential basis.

Who Do You Trust? Well, Don't

Nick Abbot | Posted 26.08.2013 | UK
Nick Abbot

Well, this is a nice to-do and no mistake. The constant eye-popping revelations about the people and institutions that we used to cherish and respect ...

After Leveson, Is Citizen Journalism the Answer?

Deborah Hobson | Posted 06.08.2013 | UK
Deborah Hobson

Lots of journalists and politicians have had their say about the bad state of the British tabloid press after the phone hacking scandal that closed do...

18th-Century Crowd-Funding

Adrian Teal | Posted 09.07.2013 | UK Entertainment
Adrian Teal

The 18th century was a Golden Age for newspapers. The Georgian press delighted in cataloguing the vices of the age, and playwrights, politicians, actors, and courtesans were all afforded celebrity status by magazines and popular prints of the period. The parallels with today's media are startlingly obvious.

The Mating Habits of the British Barrister Bird Are One of the Deep Mysteries of the Universe

Richard Caseby | Posted 30.06.2013 | UK
Richard Caseby

What business is it of ours if Mr David Sherborne, barrister to the victims of phone hacking and other alleged press abuses at the Leveson Inquiry, stamps his feet, warbles his throat and unfurls his tail feathers to attract a mate? If a relationship is explored during a public inquiry between two counsel on different sides of such a high profile event then there is a genuine public interest in the timing and extent of those rituals.

The Real Royal Charter: Ten Gains for the Public

Professor Brian Cathcart | Posted 30.06.2013 | UK Politics
Professor Brian Cathcart

The Royal Charter on the press that was approved by all parties in Parliament on 18 March will benefit the public in many ways. The Charter, which is based on the recommendations of the year-long Leveson Inquiry and has the support of many victims of press abuses, creates a framework for press self-regulation that meets basic regulatory standards.

A Close Shave: Journalists at the Sharp End

Neil Durkin | Posted 29.06.2013 | UK
Neil Durkin

In fact it's always timely to be reminded of the fact that journalists are a vital pillar of any properly functioning democratic society. And this is notwithstanding the recent hammering that some parts of the profession have taken in this country over phone-hacking and other illegal activity. The fall-out from Leveson shouldn't distract us from the extremely serious work that journalists regularly do.

The Duchess, the BBC, and the Scouts - Is This Stuff Really News?

Jack Butler | Posted 21.06.2013 | UK Universities & Education
Jack Butler

The main reason, in fact, the only reason why the BBC has chosen to prioritise the royals, throughout the Duchess's pregnancy, throughout her marriage to Prince William, throughout the jubilee, is because it is pandering to the right-wing media, of which it is absolutely and permanently petrified.

Is Newsporn the Next Trend?

Bonnie Greer | Posted 21.06.2013 | UK
Bonnie Greer

I was abroad last week (not in the US) where the only thing that I could watch for rolling news was CNN. Well, it looks like I'm part of what has to be the legions of people asking: "What the hell has happened to CNN?"

Raikkonen Says Tires Are Fine

Todd McCandless | Posted 18.06.2013 | UK Sport
Todd McCandless

Let's face it, Kimi Raikkonen shows no sign of heading for the nadir of his popularity and grip on F1 fans the world over. They guy can simply do no wrong no matter how terse, curt, snippy or vulgar he gets.

UK Press Regulation: To Sign Up or Not to Sign Up, That Is the Question?

Paul Tweed | Posted 10.06.2013 | UK
Paul Tweed

As a practicing lawyer frequently representing a cross-section of victims ranging from A-listers to politicians, while at the same time also having a significant number of journalists and publishers on my client list, I often have to change hats when arguing for press freedom on the one hand, and striving to protect the basic reputational and other rights of the ordinary man on the street on the other.

Mrs Mountable Loves The Daily Mail

Nicky Clark | Posted 04.06.2013 | UK Comedy
Nicky Clark

It's all there. Showbiz, make up tips, political news and many, many articles on how women have let themselves age, gained weight and caused the breakdown of society by not remaining at home to raise their offspring or indeed not having children at all, which is of course very wrong of them.

Digital Tipping Point for UK National Newspapers

Mark Knight | Posted 03.06.2013 | UK
Mark Knight

The announcement made by The Telegraph Group last week to start charging UK readers to access its digital content could mark a tipping point for other UK newspaper publishers.