UK Research

Blood Cancer Awareness Month 2017

Jack Abrey | Posted 13.09.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Jack Abrey

Research has broken the sound barrier. Research has produced plants that can tolerate drought. Research has made space exploration a feasible reality. Research makes the impossible, possible and one day, research will beat blood cancer.

Why People With Dementia Deserve More From Science

James Pickett | Posted 04.09.2017 | UK Lifestyle
James Pickett

Last week a research story about lithium and dementia from Denmark caught the attention of the UK press and I have since been asked by a number of families about potential trials after I commented in the press.

Family Life And Quality Time: A Solvable Problem

Dr. Richard Woolfson | Posted 29.08.2017 | UK Parents
Dr. Richard Woolfson

Family life with children is hectic and time is always at a premium. Everyone - young and old - has their own busy schedules, and this means that there may only be a few moments available every day for activities which involve both parents and children.

Reversing The Decline Of Dementia Through Nutritional Science

Sophie Murray | Posted 22.08.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Sophie Murray

There has been significant media attention devoted to the ways in which people can reduce their risk of getting dementia through a range of lifestyle factors, including a healthy diet, exercise and not smoking. What has not been focused on to the same extent, however, are the ways people can reverse the decline of dementia once they have already got the condition

Completing My Wife's Bucket List After Losing Her To Dementia At 43

Steve Boryszczuk | Posted 10.08.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Steve Boryszczuk

Since my wife's death, I've been ticking off the bucket list which she wrote many years ago. As we had children so young, she had planned our worldwide adventure for when they had flown the nest. Of course back then we had no idea she would never be able to fulfil her dream.

Treating Multiple Sclerosis: We Need To Address Gaps In Care And Conversations

Trishna Bharadia | Posted 07.08.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Trishna Bharadia

everybody banner Imagine you're 28, developing your career, relationships, trying to get on the property ladder and starting to make your way in the world. Then you're diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, the most widespread disabling neurological condition for young people around the world, for which there is currently no cure. That was me in 2008.

Now Is The Time For Brave And Bold Action To Clean Up Our Air

Simon Gillespie | Posted 28.07.2017 | UK Politics
Simon Gillespie

Air pollution is an invisible but deadly problem. Right now, the health of thousands of people across the UK is under threat from dangerously high levels of air pollution. It's a threat that requires immediate action.

I'm 22 And Have A Learning Disability And, Like Many Others, I'm Lonely

Michelle Ornstein | Posted 27.07.2017 | UK Universities & Education
Michelle Ornstein

There should be more opportunities for people with a learning disability to get out and about. There should be more clubs for people with a learning disability. There should be more people there to help people to get out and about and when we do go out people shouldn't feel awkward around us.

The Gig Economy And The World Of Unicorns

Ehsan Khodarahmi | Posted 26.07.2017 | UK Tech
Ehsan Khodarahmi

No-one really knows what the Gig Economy is all about The Gig Economy is based upon either disrupting an existing big business model or it is providi...

I've Lost My Mum, Dad And Sister To Cancer, But I'll Keep Fighting It

Jo Walker | Posted 21.07.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Jo Walker

My mum Rita was just 49 when she died from ovarian cancer. John, my dad, was 69. He had pancreatic cancer, while my sister, Gina, was 55 when she died, and Aunt Lilian, who died last year, also had pancreatic cancer. My other sister, Lesley is a breast cancer survivor.

Research Holds The Key To Helping Those Affected By Rare Diseases

Dr. Francesco Del Galdo | Posted 18.07.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Dr. Francesco Del Galdo

More training for GPs and health care professionals in recognising the symptoms would undoubtedly help in reducing diagnosis times. Practically, together with training, a flow chart on how to address symptoms that may be very common if isolated, but together can define the onset of a connective tissue disease like scleroderma, would be a good starting point.

Smarties Only Have Part Of The Answer

Pam Jarvis | Posted 13.07.2017 | UK Parents
Pam Jarvis

While inequitable marking of such high stakes assessments is of course an issue that must be urgently dealt with, it seems to me that the core problem lies at a more fundamental level of the process, a misunderstanding of the relationship between data and assessment.

Heading For The Hill Forts

Mike Collins | Posted 05.07.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Mike Collins

The beauty of this research project is that it showcases the whole range of hillforts that can be found in the countryside like pearls on a necklace. It takes you beyond the really well-known and much visited sites and demonstrates how fundamental these places have been to the story of these islands over hundreds of years.

Virtual Company Is The Next Step To Create New Drugs For Parkinson's

Steve Ford | Posted 05.06.2017 | UK Tech
Steve Ford

200 years since Parkinson's was first recognised as a condition, science has unlocked key discoveries that could transform lives. Now, this innovative new way of working will enable the charity to help harness these research discoveries and help find a cure in years - rather than decades.

Only 1% Of Facebook Video Goes Viral: How You Can Too

Dror Ginzberg | Posted 05.06.2017 | UK Tech
Dror Ginzberg

Today, all publishers are looking for virality. If done right, viral videos can make up to 60% of all a publisher's shares over a three month period. While this pressure may be intimidating, don't despair. Focus on tackling some of the above areas and developing a solid strategy - then you too could obtain viral fame.

Asking The Important Questions About Mental Illness

Cynthia Joyce | Posted 10.05.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Cynthia Joyce

One in four people are affected by mental illness, whether through your own experience or that of friends or family, you are unlikely to have travelled through life without being touched in some way. It's therefore unsurprising that so many of us are compelled to demand some sort of understanding. For us, and for future generations.

How Do You Balance Clinical Guidelines With What Young People Want From Their Treatment?

Dr Nick Midgley | Posted 08.05.2017 | UK Parents
Dr Nick Midgley

Clinicians could support young people through this process by opening a dialogue where young people can ask questions and express any concerns or worries they may have throughout the decision-making process, both about whether or not to use medication, and if they do, whether it is working for them and how and when they may want to stop.

Innovation Can Transform The Way We Look At Exercise

Dr Wendy Holden | Posted 04.05.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Dr Wendy Holden

Most of us know that being physically active is important for our overall health and wellbeing. Not only does exercise help to control weight, but it also boosts energy and can help combat health conditions and improve mood. This especially holds true for people with rheumatoid arthritis.

Personal Shopping Is Dead. Long Live Virtual Styling!

Danae Varangis | Posted 27.04.2017 | UK Style
Danae Varangis

These results seem to indicate that the idea of professional, one-on-one styling is all but dead. While it might have been an innovative and exciting concept when it was first introduced, the expectations and needs of consumers have evolved in accordance with the digital age we live in and traditional personal shopping has simply failed to keep up with the times.

Why Artificial Intelligence Still Needs A Human Touch

Vivian Chan | Posted 24.04.2017 | UK Tech
Vivian Chan

Rather than thinking of AI as a replacement for human intelligence, information providers such as Facebook and Google ought to consider how one can enhance the another. Only by blending AI's ability to quickly process vast quantities of data with the ability of humans to understand nuance and context can we ensure facts remain facts in this post-truth era.

Screen Time To Wild Time: 60 Years Of The BBC Natural History Unit

Mike Collins | Posted 03.04.2017 | UK Entertainment
Mike Collins

Telling stories that inspire must be at the heart of getting people back into nature and captivating the next generation. Films and radio produced by the Natural History Unit will without any doubt play an essential role in allowing us to see the sheer beauty and diversity of wildlife around the world and getting us in to nature in our own backyard.

As Female Scientists, We Can't Give Up On Leading The World Of Research

Frances Evans | Posted 27.03.2017 | UK Tech
Frances Evans

all women everywhere During my undergraduate and my master's degrees, I always wondered why so many of my lecturers were men and why there were hardly any women in our faculty. Especially when my classes were made up of mostly female students; it just didn't add up.

Researches Climate Change, Funds Climate Change: Why Fossil Free UCL Will Escalate

Olivia Goldin | Posted 22.03.2017 | UK Politics
Olivia Goldin

As a society, we must push all energy companies to become accountable green investors and contribute meaningfully to the global shift away from fossil fuels. Until they do so, we will continue to intensify pressure on our institutions to reject an industry that compromises all of our futures in the name of profit - and, ultimately, remove its social license to operate.

From Science Fiction To Science Journals: How AI Is Reshaping Research

Vivian Chan | Posted 21.03.2017 | UK Tech
Vivian Chan

AI no longer belongs to the realm of science fiction. From voice recognition to self-driving cars and medical diagnosis, 'artificial intelligence' has, in just the last few years, woven its way into our lives at work and at home.

BRCA And Me: The Impact Of Screening High-Risk Women Against Ovarian Cancer

Caroline Presho | Posted 05.03.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Caroline Presho

Eight years ago, I had a double mastectomy when I was just 35 years old. Four years later, I had my ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. Yet I hadn't had a cancer diagnosis, or even signs or symptoms. This was purely an act of prevention.