Snails

Snail Venom Could Be Used To Create Pain Relief Drug 'Stronger Than Morphine', Experts Say

PA/The Huffington Post UK | Posted 17.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle

Venom of a sea snail could be used to create a pain relief drug stronger than morphine, scientists say. Scientists have reported creating five new ...

Snails (And Their Eggs) Are Low-Fat, Aphrodisiacs. But Would You Try Them?

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Lifestyle

Snails and their eggs (or 'white caviar', because there is something a bit gross about thinking about unborn snail babies) are making their way across...

How Fast Can A Snail Travel?

PA/The Huffington Post UK | Posted 22.10.2013 | UK

The top speed of a snail is a sluggish one metre per hour, a new study has revealed. But that pace allows them to explore the length of an average ...

Faster, Faster, Faster!

Barcroft Media | Sara C Nelson | Posted 06.11.2012 | UK

Check out this praying mantis totally bossing a trek through the Borneo jungle - on the back of a SNAIL. Yes, it may not be the fastest mode of tr...

Walking On Water (PICTURES)

Huffington Post UK | Sara C Nelson | Posted 10.10.2012 | UK

Exploring a garden on a dewy morning, these insects appear to be walking on water. The crystal clear shots, taken by photographer Nunu Rizani, cap...

PHOTOS: Giant Snails Seized At UK Border

PA | Posted 19.09.2012 | UK

A group of 36 giant snails has been seized from a passenger's luggage at an airport. Border Force officers at Glasgow Airport found the living gian...

Confessions of a Tweetaholic

Marc Paterson | Posted 02.03.2012 | UK Comedy
Marc Paterson

I have a confession to make. I posted recently about my leaving Twitter. Well, it's true I did but the good people at Tweet central give you 30 days in which to chew on the prospect of committing social suicide and it pains me to say I did skulk back like a recently divorced man to his mother.

An Octopus and a Snail Walk Into a Bar...An Ode to Organic Intelligence and Intellectual Stupidity

Théo Le Bret | Posted 06.02.2012 | UK
Théo Le Bret

What makes an octopus intelligent is not its brains, but its arms, and the physical perfection of these arms rather than the complexity of the nervous system that controls them.