Special Needs

The Guessing Game When Your Child Is Non-Verbal

Laura Rutherford | Posted 16.03.2017 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

But it's also oh so bittersweet, like so many things, because I think of how easy she has it compared to our five year old son, Brody, who struggles to tell us what he wants constantly because of a learning disability and autism.

Raising Awareness Of Changing Places Toilets This Disabled Access Day

Laura Rutherford | Posted 07.03.2017 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

I won't give up campaigning for my child to have the basic human right of access to a toilet when we're out and about. Why should he be excluded? Why shouldn't our family be welcomed everywhere like all other families?

Reactions To My Son's Wheelchair

Laura Rutherford | Posted 03.03.2017 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

The wheelchair has been great. Pushing him in it is much easier than the buggy he was too big for. And sometimes it helps by providing a quick explanation to strangers when he has challenging behaviour. I suppose because with a wheelchair, disability is quickly visible. But it took a while to get used to having it...

Sensory Processing Disorder Is Unpredictable

Laura Rutherford | Posted 15.02.2017 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

It was only as time moved on -- when we realised that Brody had various disabilities and I had the opportunity to meet more doctors, therapists and mums walking similar paths-- that I discovered sensory issues was a thing. And that it was known to many as sensory processing disorder (SPD).

Mindfulness. A Special Needs Approach

Jane Scott | Posted 07.02.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Jane Scott

This plan, based on the life experience of someone who I have studied assiduously for ten years offers you some answers, what you choose to do with them is your responsibility.

When Is It OK To Laugh At People With Disabilities?

Amanda Elias | Posted 06.02.2017 | UK Lifestyle
Amanda Elias

I get it, people don't understand Parkinson's, it's just a condition that makes you shake right? Wrong, sadly very very wrong. The thing with Parkinson's is that there is no one box fits all label, each sufferer will experience different symptoms.

Stuck At Home Mum

Laura Rutherford | Posted 23.01.2017 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

The sad thing is I don't even feel confident anymore going to friends' houses with the two of them. I can't sit down and leave them to wander and I can't follow them both when they go in different directions. Most friends don't need stairgates anymore or don't have to worry about things like hot drinks being grabbed or breakables being within reach.

I'm Sorry - A Letter To My Autistic Children

Jodie Eaton | Posted 19.01.2017 | UK Parents
Jodie Eaton

I'm sorry I couldn't be of any help today at the school when you needed the parents to pitch in to help clean up the gardens. I'm sorry I never baked those cakes I promised the kids and myself that I'd make for the cake sale.

Defending Parent Bloggers

Kelly Kemp | Posted 17.01.2017 | UK Parents
Kelly Kemp

I write to keep those that care about us updated about Tink's progress (or not, as the case may be!). I write to share the funny things she does, the little things that amaze me or worry me. She's awesome and I want the world to know!

Five Things Parents Of Autistic Kids Wish People Wouldn't Say!

Kelly Kemp | Posted 12.01.2017 | UK Parents
Kelly Kemp

Of course, the vast majority of people are well-meaning, but, unless they have personal experience, it can be difficult to know what to say, how to react to the news. There are several things that people will say to parents when they hear of their child's diagnosis - here are some examples and suggestions of things to try instead!

Special Needs And The 'C' Word...

Michala Dominey | Posted 15.12.2016 | UK Parents
Michala Dominey

When your bundles of joy enter the world, most people have a wonderful vision of what parenthood will be like -- how you'll capture every moment on camera, fill out every section of the baby's year book and spend Christmases savouring every beautiful moment.

Acceptance

Laura Rutherford | Posted 09.12.2016 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

Now that Brody is nearly 5, I have finally got used to the fact that Global Development Delay (GDD) doesn't mean "may catch up" for us. It's forever. And because he is still primarily undiagnosed, despite an autism and epilepsy diagnosis (as well as a few others), GDD seems to be moving on to a new "catch all" term - learning disability.

What's In A Word?

Laura Rutherford | Posted 10.10.2016 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

Words can be powerful. They can bring joy. One word can change someone's day - life even. But in the same speed in which they can bring happiness, the...

Who Am I?

Vikki Hammond | Posted 12.09.2016 | UK Parents
Vikki Hammond

I am your voice, I do these things because I want the best for you. I want you here with me for as long as possible. Although what you have gone through is hard, and every day is a battle. I need you, here with me. Because without you I am nothing, I am no one. But with you I am your mum x

From The Heart, A Letter To My Children

Vikki Hammond | Posted 26.08.2016 | UK Parents
Vikki Hammond

Bailey summed it all up for me one day in the car.. "Mummy we are so lucky to have Kai, just think some people never get to experience someone like him. We are very lucky." With that sentence I felt my job was done, Kai has brought more joy into your life's than I could ever imagine.

Comparison Is the Thief of Joy

Laura Rutherford | Posted 27.07.2016 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

A child who is mentally 12-14 months old in a four-year-old's body is normal to us. But it's difficult for others to understand when his disabilities are - at first - invisible. Because he appears to them to be a typical four-year-old boy. I suppose, apart from the occasional what ifs, this is the hardest part. When other people get it, it's truly a real tonic.

Shake It Off (Or Alternatively Fetch the Imaginary Voodoo Doll)

Laura Rutherford | Posted 11.07.2016 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

When it comes to pass-remarkable comments to do with my parenting, I've tended to let them go in the past (okay, I'll admit I may have fetched my imaginary voodoo doll once or twice...). Let's be honest, pretty much all parents encounter them every so often, be it for giving in to a tantrum "too easily" or co-sleeping on a bad night.

Simple Things That Help SEND Parents

Laura Rutherford | Posted 07.07.2016 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

There are many things I could list that make life for me that little bit easier as a SEND parent - from Firefly shopping trolley seats and adequate Ch...

Why We Need Supermarkets to Sell Bigger Nappies

Laura Rutherford | Posted 28.06.2016 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

When you have a baby one of the many things you don't expect to use indefinitely is nappies. You look in to the not so distance future and envisage *the joys of* potty training and eventually a nappy-free life.

Why I Value My Son's Multinational Carers

Suzanne Askham | Posted 28.06.2016 | UK Lifestyle
Suzanne Askham

My 20-year-old son has multiple health issues, and learning difficulties. He therefore needs 24/7 care. He lives, term-time, at an outstanding specialist college. He is looked after by a fantastic team of carers, or facilitators, who come from a whole range of different places, including England, South Africa... and, of course, Eastern Europe. Poland is high on that list.

Hello Epilepsy

Laura Rutherford | Posted 21.06.2016 | UK Parents
Laura Rutherford

When your child has epilepsy, it is a constant weight on your mind. Without fail, the moment that weight eases off, a seizure will happen - just to make sure you know it's still there. It's thoughtful like that.

What If Your Child Had a Rare Chromosome Disorder?

Arti Patel | Posted 13.06.2016 | UK Parents
Arti Patel

Imagine a scenario where that tiny little human life you created receives an earth shattering diagnosis. The doctors have no information about what it means or how it will affect your little one. Your family is left at the crossroads. You don't know where to go or who to turn to. What help will my child need? How can I get it? Where do I get information? Who can help me and my family? Why me, why us?

Six Life Lessons From the NICU

Alison Bloomer | Posted 26.05.2016 | UK Parents
Alison Bloomer

For every nine families that walk out of the door of the maternity wing elated yet flagging, one will spend time in the neonatal unit. And within each unit is this room. A room that if it could talk would tell you such tragic tales. That has witnessed the deepest depths of despair.

This Is What I Learned, Living in an Intensive Care Unit

Suzanne Askham | Posted 22.05.2016 | UK Lifestyle
Suzanne Askham

Recently I had the rare and shocking privilege of living in an Intensive Care Unit, or ICU, for three months. I was not a patient, nor a member of sta...

Eight Things I've Learnt About Life With an Undiagnosed Child

Alison Bloomer | Posted 28.04.2016 | UK Parents
Alison Bloomer

The 4th Undiagnosed Children's Awareness Day takes place on Friday April 29th. The aim is to raise awareness of undiagnosed genetic conditions and SWAN UK (syndromes without a name), the charity that offers support and information to families of children affected by these conditions.