War

Law, War and Human Rights

Toby Cadman | Posted 23.07.2014 | UK Politics
Toby Cadman

On 11 September 2001 and then on 7 July 2005 our outlook changed. We were struck with a level of fear and vulnerability that allowed principles that we once held dear to suddenly evaporate. In some circles torture suddenly became justified under exceptional circumstances. The war on terror emerged and the rule of law fell away.

The Villagers of Leavesden unveil a new WW1 Memorial

Stephen Liddell | Posted 17.07.2014 | UK
Stephen Liddell

Across the country and around the world, old and tired looking WW1 memorials are being repaired. Most places have refurbished their existing memorial...

South Sudan Is Locked in a Cycle of Violence

Elizabeth Ashamu Deng | Posted 11.07.2014 | UK
Elizabeth Ashamu Deng

On 9 July, South Sudan will mark three years as an independent state. But the growing pains of the world's newest country are evident as millions are trapped in a vicious cycle of violence. Amnesty International's Elizabeth Ashamu Deng looks at some of the problems facing South Sudan today.

Who Is Really Paying the Price of Fighting in South Sudan?

Luol Deng | Posted 09.07.2014 | UK Sport
Luol Deng

I know what it's like to lose your childhood to war. When I was five and conflict raged in Sudan, my family and I were amongst the lucky ones to leave for Egypt. Four years later we were granted asylum in the United Kingdom. Inspired by legendary South Sudanese basketball player Manute Bol, my siblings and I took up basketball which helped us fit in. Like Manute, I was lucky enough to turn the sport I loved into a career as a professional NBA player in the United States.

Will Children of Syria Ever Heal From the Scars of War?

Kumar Tiku | Posted 06.07.2014 | UK
Kumar Tiku

During the course of my humanitarian work in Syria, I have listened to many children share their perspectives. The death of family members, whether siblings or a parent or other loved one is common. Being displaced from their homes, often more than once, and finding their friends and communities snatched away. Memories of repeated attacks from warring parties that flattened whole neighborhoods, fires that raged through the night stay with them.

Voices of Hate

Robin Lustig | Posted 04.07.2014 | UK
Robin Lustig

Ever since the discovery on Monday of the bodies of the murdered Israeli teenagers, Naftali Frenkel, Gilad Shaar and Eyal Yifrach, and ever since the discovery on Wednesday of the body of the Palestinian teenager, Mohammed Abu Khdair, murdered apparently in revenge, I have been hearing voices in my head...

Jordan: The Jewel in the ISIS Crown

Nikita Malik | Posted 26.06.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Nikita Malik

A boy in Syria, no more than ten-or eleven-years old, faces the camera clutching a passport emblazoned with the words "Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan."..

The Importance of Soft Power

Stephen Liddell | Posted 25.06.2014 | UK
Stephen Liddell

Most people are familiar with what is known as Hard Power. The idea that someone with more swords, bigger guns and overwhelming military ability can force someone to do something against their will but which is almost entirely in favour of those holding the gun. History is full of situations, the ancient Chinese, Persians, Romans all the way through to the British, French, American and Russians...

Bombing Iraq: Death and Destruction as Instruments of Statecraft

Matt Carr | Posted 20.06.2014 | UK Politics
Matt Carr

Today, faced with gloomy possibilities in Iraq that include the imminent disintegration of the Iraqi state... the Obama administration is once again considering air strikes as a policy option. And as Iraqi cities once again loom in the Imperium's bomb-sights, it's instructive to cast our eyes back on this less-than-glorious relationship between the United States, bombs and Iraq.

Why We Should Be Grateful to Football: Sport and the Decline of Conflict

Steve Taylor PhD | Posted 16.06.2014 | UK Sport
Steve Taylor PhD

I'm not a big football fan either, but, as a psychologist, I'm aware that the game carries a lot more weight than may be at first apparent. In fact, I believe that the world as a whole has a great deal to thank football for, because of the social and psychological benefits it has brought over the last 100 years or so.

Iraq - The End?

Robin Lustig | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK Politics
Robin Lustig

What folly. What crass, indescribable, unbelievable folly it was to invade Iraq in 2003. I wonder what George Bush, Donald Rumsfeld and Tony Blair think now as they read of the latest disasters to befall that wretched land. Do they still say that Iraq is better off than it was under Saddam Hussein? Do they? Really?

How Myths and Narratives Are Dominating Events in Ukraine

Larisa Sotieva | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK Politics
Larisa Sotieva

I have always admired the expressiveness of the Russian language. Popular turns of phrase that have become enshrined in everyday language reveal quite colourfully Russians' attitudes towards themselves and ongoing events. In particular I am struck by the way Russians reflect on failure with easy humour, as captured in the phrase 'they hoped for better, but it turned out as usual'.

'Monster' Myth Hides Complexity of Sexual Violence in Conflict

Henri Myrttinen | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK
Henri Myrttinen

This week has seen a flurry of activity around an issue that for far too long has been forgotten, silenced or viewed as an inevitable consequence of war: sexual violence in conflict. All of this is extremely important - but in the rush to 'do something' about the horrific crimes being committed in Syria, Central African Republic, Nigeria, and other conflict zones, we should not forget some basic premises.

Sexual Violence, the Weapon of War That Has Ceased to Die

Anita Tiessen | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK Politics
Anita Tiessen

A critical component in addressing sexual violence is to build a protective environment to prevent children and women for being exposed to violence. In the midst of crises, even the most basic risk-mitigation efforts that can be life-saving are often deemed non-essential and overlooked.

D-Day Anniversary: We Need to Make the Case for Good Wars

James Snell | Posted 10.06.2014 | UK Politics
James Snell

As someone who has an instinctive aversion to over-praising members of the military (indeed, as someone who cannot help but shudder inwardly every time 'our brave boys' are invoked), I was more than a little surprised that the commemoration of the D-Day landings, which took place last week, brought a tear to my eye.

Reasons to Be Fearful, Part 3,456,872

Nick Abbot | Posted 09.06.2014 | UK
Nick Abbot

Britain is offering 1,000 troops and the tanks they can still start to NATO so they can put on a show in Poland that they think will put Vlad the Insaner back in his box...

The Longest Day

Lara Platman | Posted 05.06.2014 | UK
Lara Platman

Arlette Gondrée, a beautiful woman, strikingly dressed in a knitted jacket with a faultless neck-chief, the epitome of Normandy style, stands proudly, having provided us with a delicious home cooked lunch, full of traditional flavours from the region, I slowly gather my thoughts examining the abundance of memorabilia in this sanctuary.

When the Sun Comes Out, Syria's War Does Not Stop

Katie Welsford | Posted 03.06.2014 | UK
Katie Welsford

Standing in the shade of olive trees on a hill in north-west Jordan, the peaceful spring afternoon was suddenly shattered. From across the valley came the heavy thud of shelling from Syria's border villages.

Field Diary: Unicef School Bags, a Symbol of Hope in War-Torn Aleppo

Hamida R. Lasseko | Posted 20.07.2014 | UK
Hamida R. Lasseko

During my visit to the Unicef-supported Basic Education School for displaced grade one to four children at the Aleppo University I met a number of confident, upbeat children, not shy to ask tough questions... As a mother, I could not hold back my tears when a young girl got up and asked me: "When will this war end?"

Fight, Flight or Tend and Befriend?

Nick Clements | Posted 06.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Nick Clements

A new theory is starting to gain strength in terms of our behavioural responses to threats. It stems from the difference in female and male response to stress. I think this new work strikes a very potent cord, and actually could be an important turning point in our connection to the world.

Sleepless in South Sudan

Aimee Ansari | Posted 02.07.2014 | UK
Aimee Ansari

I smelled the decaying bodies in Haiti after the earthquake and I got ill because of the terrible fumes of the dead buried under buildings in Lebanon after the bombings. That was nothing compared to the massacres and violence happening in South Sudan now. I won't go into the details; they're too gory, too much everything.

Who Has Time for World War III?

Jon-Christopher Bua | Posted 28.06.2014 | UK Politics
Jon-Christopher Bua

Although the ominous situation in Ukraine directly affects the EU, it is not clear is how much economic pain the US, UK and the EU are willing and able to endure to send a clear and powerful message to Putin that it is time to retreat.

Our Dysfunctional World of War and Poverty

Adnan Al-Daini | Posted 16.06.2014 | UK Politics
Adnan Al-Daini

As a species we have tremendous talents. Our scientific achievements are incredible; our advances in medicine and technology are stunning. Our social development however is still almost at Stone Age level.

Support for Children in the UK on Their Own Is Needed Now

Matthew Reed | Posted 08.06.2014 | UK
Matthew Reed

By providing children with a guardian in law, the government could guarantee that any child who arrives in the UK on their own would have one trusted adult in their life who has their best interests at heart. Someone who understands the complicated system they will have to face...

Jessica Elgot

Rwanda's Genocide Survivors Show Their Inspiring, Smiling Portraits

HuffingtonPost.com | Jessica Elgot | Posted 05.04.2014 | UK

The polaroid of the smiling boy standing with his puffed chest straining his pink and red striped t-shirt is difficult for Cyprien to look at. "Wh...