UK World

Rwanda - 20 Years on From the Genocide We Must Do More to Prevent Conflict

William Hague | Posted 06.06.2014 | UK Politics
William Hague

On this day in 1994 the Rwandan genocide was unleashed. Extremist members of Rwanda's Hutu majority set about slaughtering Tutsis and moderate Hutus, irrespective of age or gender. More than 800,000 people were killed in 100 days of murder, rape and torture. I am in Rwanda today to commemorate the genocide, pay respect to the victims and honour the ordinary people of Rwanda for their remarkable efforts to rebuild their country after experiencing unimaginable horrors. But today we must not only pause and remember the genocide, its victims and survivors; we must also reflect on the lessons of that experience...

Turkey's Transgender Community Finds New Voice

Jody Sabral | Posted 04.06.2014 | UK
Jody Sabral

While it seems Turkey's LGBT community have a long way to go to ensure legal recognition and protection, Michelle's new role in the media is a courageous new front in the fight for equality.

Making Sure Coffee Farmers Get Their Due

Harriet Lamb | Posted 03.06.2014 | UK
Harriet Lamb

We can only ever be constructively dissatisfied because the scale of the task remains so great. Millions of farmers are lining up to join Fairtrade, but they can only sell as much on fairer terms as the companies and the public buy.

Afghanistan Has Turned a Corner

Duncan Anderson | Posted 05.06.2014 | UK
Duncan Anderson

When one considers the security situation, the threats made by the Taliban, and the miserable weather, the election result has been quite phenomenal. There is something immensely humbling to see groups of people holding up their dyed fingers, as much as to say 'Suck to you, Taliban!'

Forgotten Crisis: Why Aren't We Talking About South Sudan?

Sir Nick Young | Posted 04.06.2014 | UK
Sir Nick Young

Reports of continued fighting in South Sudan are worrying. But even more distressing is how little attention this humanitarian crisis is generating. Let us not underestimate the scale of the crisis in the world's newest nation.

Living in the Shadow of Genocide

Robin Lustig | Posted 04.06.2014 | UK
Robin Lustig

We live, 20 years after the murder of an estimated 800,000 people, in the shadow of Rwanda. And this weekend, on the anniversary of the start of the Rwanda genocide, is a good time to contemplate the significance of that shadow.

Syrian Refugees in Lebanon: The Neighbour Carrying a Huge Burden

Penny Sims | Posted 04.06.2014 | UK
Penny Sims

Yesterday the number of Syrian refugees registered by the UN in Lebanon passed one million. Most Lebanese people will tell you the real number is much higher.

Animals Should Never Be 'Surplus to Requirements'

Mark Jones | Posted 03.06.2014 | UK
Mark Jones

The storm of protest that rained down on Copenhagen Zoo following the killing and butchery of Marius, a healthy young giraffe, did not discourage its officials from announcing a few weeks later that a pride of lions - maybe even the ones to whom Marius was publicly fed - had similarly been killed...

Standing #WithSyria

Jo Wood | Posted 02.06.2014 | UK Entertainment
Jo Wood

I thought that we lived in an era that looked back on the horrors of Rwanda and Yugoslavia and said 'never again' and meant it. Sadly I think the crisis in Syria proves all of us wrong and we are all collectively guilty for allowing the country to collapse as it has. Three years on and we see both a biblical level exodus combined with a levels of violence that few of us could have imagined in our wildest dreams. Over nine million people, nearly half of the country, forced from their homes and on the move exposed to a new life of uncertainty, poverty and too often despair.

Don't Free Spy Jonathan Pollard

Ivan Eland | Posted 01.06.2014 | UK
Ivan Eland

Some in the United States also questioned whether Pollard should remain in jail, because, after all, he had "only" been spying for a cherished U.S. ally. However, instead of questioning whether Pollard should be behind bars, perhaps proponents of his release instead should be questioning the cozy U.S. relationship with Israel.

A Ray of God, a Ray of Hope for Afghanistan

Farzana Balooch | Posted 01.06.2014 | UK
Farzana Balooch

In spite of the uncertainty we currently face, the endurance of my people throughout conflict, and in particular the resilience of women, gives me hope for Afghanistan's future. I pray that they have learned from this last decade and can use that learning to build a better future for us all.

For Sea Shepherd - A Vindication

Captain Paul Watson | Posted 01.06.2014 | UK
Captain Paul Watson

We have been opposing the Japanese whaling fleets in the Southern Ocean since 2002 and we have undertaken ten campaigns with numerous ships and more than a thousand volunteers to non-violently intervene against what we have always insisted is illegal whaling. Japan filed suit against Sea Shepherd USA in the U.S. courts and had Sea Shepherd and myself charged with numerous counts of contempt for which we were found not guilty. Japanese whalers destroyed a Sea Shepherd vessel and injured numerous Sea Shepherd crew-members.

Ever Wondered What A Sumo Wrestler Eats? Here's Your Chance

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 02.04.2014 | UK Lifestyle

You can sit in as many French cafes or sushi bars, but the only real way to find out what the world eats is to frogleap the tourist traps and head str...

Football, Fear and Torture in Transnistria: Undercover in a Country That Doesn't Officially Exist

Jim Wickens | Posted 01.06.2014 | UK
Jim Wickens

It sounds like a distant planet in a dystopian sci fi movie, and the place itself doesn't disappoint. Welcome to Transnistria, a tiny strip of land measuring less than 15 miles wide. Long linked to organised crime, the government here doesn't take too kindly to journalists, so for a special report with Channel 4 News, we went in undercover.

Birangona: Will the World Listen?

Leesa Gazi | Posted 31.05.2014 | UK
Leesa Gazi

It is estimated that more than 200,000 women and girls were systematically raped and tortured by the Pakistani army and their Bangladeshi collaborators in the Liberation War of Bangladesh in 1971. I grew up listening to the stories of the Liberation movement from my father.

Delivering Life-Saving Supples to a Besieged Syrian Town

Razan Rashidi | Posted 31.05.2014 | UK
Razan Rashidi

We arrived at the Douma branch of Sarc to meet 35 volunteers who are working under very tiring circumstances. The city, with a population of 50,000, has been under a tight blockade for more than six months.

How Your Clothes Can Restore Sight in Ethiopia

Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall | Posted 31.05.2014 | UK
Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall

Around the world 100million older people have to live on less than 60p a day. Many of them support and care for their grandchildren. The grandparents often go hungry so that the children can eat. Many are also having to cope with the challenges of getting older, including managing difficult health conditions.

A Taxi Driver's Guide to Peace in the Philippines

Phil Vernon | Posted 28.05.2014 | UK
Phil Vernon

Taking full advantage of the opportunity for peace in the Philippines will require a sustained effort on the part of central and local governments, by the rebel movements, as well as in civil society and the business community, over many years. Some of the factors they will need to take into account were identified at by our taxi driver last night.

The Dark Side of the Planet: Where the Death Penalty Is King

Neil Durkin | Posted 30.05.2014 | UK
Neil Durkin

Politicised show trials, error-strewn and near-racist courtrooms, mistakes corrected decades after the fact, ethically indefensible overlaps between judicial and medical protocols, ghoulishly botched attempted executions... all these and more are actually fairly typical of the 21st-century death penalty, not rare aberrations.

Fifa Feeling the Heat Over Qatar World Cup Decision?

Tony Jimenez | Posted 28.05.2014 | UK Sport
Tony Jimenez

Another day, another predictable public relations disaster for FIFA. With this summer's World Cup now just a matter of months away, and Brazil's preparations still lagging alarmingly behind schedule, the governing body has hardly covered itself in glory of late.

Executions Make a Mockery of Any Justice System

Sherif Elsayed-Ali | Posted 27.05.2014 | UK
Sherif Elsayed-Ali

One of the biggest justifications for the death penalty is that it supposedly acts as a deterrent against committing the most serious crimes. But let's call this argument what it really is: wishful thinking. There is simply no convincing evidence that the death penalty deters from crime more than other forms of punishments. In fact, there is evidence to the contrary.

Don't Abandon Afghanistan Again - Its Poorest People Need and Deserve Our Support

Jehangir Malik | Posted 27.05.2014 | UK
Jehangir Malik

We need to focus as never before on the poorest and most vulnerable communities across the country, investing above all in the infrastructure of basic health and education services that will help lift people out of poverty. Afghanistan needs more schools, more health clinics and more trained teachers and health professionals to staff them.

Egypt Must Overturn Death Sentences Given to Morsi Supporters

Ian Lucas | Posted 26.05.2014 | UK Politics
Ian Lucas

The shocking news that 528 supporters of former Egyptian President Morsi have been sentenced to death represents a worrying reversal of recent progress towards a democratic future for the people of Egypt.

Our Fight to Save Our Friend Yashika

Lee Pedder | Posted 25.05.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Lee Pedder

Last Thursday; we discovered that Yashika's work may never pay-off and that her dreams may never come to fruition. We were then informed that she would be removed from the life that she had built here and sent back to Mauritius, the very place that her mother had worked so hard to remove her from. Her life here would be ruined and the educational endeavours that she has made, nullified.

A Voice of Hope for India's Unprivileged

Preetam Kaushik | Posted 24.05.2014 | UK Tech
Preetam Kaushik

MUMBAI -- Popular narratives about India typically divide the country into two neat halves. An aspirational urban middle class, whose command of English has seen the country surge as an IT superpower, and a wretched underclass, living in poverty, in remote rural expanses, cut-off from the very technologies that has India making the headlines from Bangalore to the Bay Area.