Young Adult Books

TV is Dead - Long Live YouTube

CJ Daugherty | Posted 07.12.2014 | UK Tech
CJ Daugherty

We visit YouTube too, of course, but there's a massive generational divide on this. According to a recent Ofcom study, teenagers watch half the amount of TV their parents watch. And they spend 600% more time watching online videos than adults. That is not a typo. Six hundred percent.

How a Near Life Experience Changed My Life

Laxmi Hariharan | Posted 31.10.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Laxmi Hariharan

Perhaps it was being put deep under by the anaesthesia, for I am told it really is a little like dying. Well the closest one comes to dying without actually... dying; when you are sedated enough for them to cut into you. Maybe it was that which dropped me deep into myself, enough to touch the stuff that really mattered. The debris hidden behind decades of conditioning shot to the top.

Can Science Fiction Drive Social Change?

Phil Pauley | Posted 23.11.2014 | UK Entertainment
Phil Pauley

I hope that my books - and whatever forms the stories may go on to take - will capture the imagination of their readers, create a vehicle for discussing environmental issues, and encourage young people to tackle global challenges by becoming the scientists and engineers of tomorrow.

Why YA Is for Everyone

Gayle Forman | Posted 02.11.2014 | UK Entertainment
Gayle Forman

What I will sometimes do is explain that a lot of the work that is being published as YA now would've been published as coming-of-age adult literature twenty years ago, when the YA category didn't really exist as it does now. If J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye were published today, it would be solidly YA. That seems to make them feel better.

Out Here

B.J. Epstein | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Lifestyle
B.J. Epstein

How often do young lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or otherwise queer children or young adults see positive reflections of themselves and their lives in literature, in the media, on TV, or in films? When will they be featured in a documentary? When will they learn that they too are productive, welcomed, supported members of society who have bright futures ahead of them?

Are Happily-ever-afters in YA Novels Bad for Teenagers' Love Lives?

Holly Bourne | Posted 03.11.2013 | UK Lifestyle
Holly Bourne

I don't think I'll overcome the disappointment that nobody - ever - has chased me through an airport to stop me getting on a plane. Basically - when it comes to what I've been told about love, and what love actually *is* - I've been massively short-changed. And I'm not the only one.

A Beginner's Guide to Boy Nobody

Sarah Wharton | Posted 05.08.2013 | UK Entertainment
Sarah Wharton

Action-thriller Boy Nobody is the first in a trilogy of young adult novels by Allen Zadoff about a teen assassin, brainwashed by The Program to be a perfect, emotionless killing machine - imperceptible by the authorities because he's just a kid.

Interview: GONE Author Michael Grant

Ben Falk | Posted 15.07.2013 | UK Entertainment
Ben Falk

The prolific writer behind Bzrk, the Animorphs saga and most importantly (for me anyway) the GONE series has finally put the last full stop on the sixth and concluding instalment of the latter, called Light, which was published last month.

Interview: Best-selling YA author Maggie Stiefvater

Ben Falk | Posted 16.06.2013 | UK Entertainment
Ben Falk

U.S. author Maggie Stiefvater has sold over two million books worldwide, with hits including the Shiver series, The Scorpio Races and The Raven Boys - YA stories with a fantasy twist.

Interview: Best-selling Author Lauren Oliver

Ben Falk | Posted 29.05.2013 | UK Entertainment
Ben Falk

Lauren Oliver is the best-selling author of Before I Fall and the Delirium trilogy. The final book in the latter series - Requiem - has just been released. It wraps up the story of Lena, a plucky young woman who lives in a future America where love is classified as an illness and young people are "cured" of the disease.

Interview: YA Author CJ Daugherty

Ben Falk | Posted 06.03.2013 | Home
Ben Falk

American-born writer CJ Daugherty is the author of the successful Night School series, the first of which was the #5 bestselling YA debut of 2012. I got a chance to chat with CJ about the new book.

What it Takes to be 'Popular'

Scott De Buitléir | Posted 08.12.2012 | Home
Scott De Buitléir

Set in today's Northern Ireland, Popular follows the story of four privileged Belfast teens with more money than sense as they each learn a bit more about each other and their own lives.

Darren Shan's Zom-B Terror!

Scott De Buitléir | Posted 25.11.2012 | Home
Scott De Buitléir

Shan - real name Darren O'Shaughnessy - became a full-time writer at the age of 23, and has since sold over 20 million copies of his books worldwide, becoming bestsellers in the US, UK, Ireland and elsewhere.

Interview: Young Adult Author Katie McGarry

Ben Falk | Posted 12.11.2012 | Home
Ben Falk

I know why I wanted to read gritty books when I was a teenager-- because my life was gritty. It wasn't sunshine and roses. Pink fuzzy unicorns weren't puking rainbows. There were issues in my home. There were issues in my friends' homes.

The 'Most Selfless Sexual Act': Anal Sex, Teenagers, Pegging and Literature

B.J. Epstein | Posted 30.06.2012 | UK Lifestyle
B.J. Epstein

WARNING: This blog contains adult content Of late, there have been a number of news stories about anal sex and in particular how it is becoming more common. You might wonder how private sexual acts are newsworthy, but there are a few reasons here.

Reading The Hunger Games with the Post-Apocalyptic Book Club in The Coal Hole

Emily Ding | Posted 28.03.2012 | Home
Emily Ding

I quickened my steps to escape the wind lashing Waterloo Bridge and ducked left, looking around for a sign. I was searching for what I had imagined to be a gritty pub, where members of the Post-Apocalyptic Book Club were congregating: The Coal Hole.

Book Review: Patterns Of Paper Monsters by Emma Rathbone: When Women Do Dudes

Abigail Tarttelin | Posted 30.11.2011 | UK Entertainment
Abigail Tarttelin

Having been interviewed on the authorship of a book about a teenage boy, I notice no-one fails to ask why I wrote from a male perspective. I usually mention that much of the world's cultural output reinforces the male voice - a recent survey of British television found that two thirds of the characters in fictional works were male.