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China: An Economic Miracle Generously Seasoned with Aggression

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It's a country where rosy dreams went awry for decades. The hopes were squashed, minds fractured, hopes hushed up and stomachs were filled with empty promises. How long would a country sustain on words and visions alone? A country with a history of 4000 years seemed to have suffered like no other nation did. After exploding out from 30 years of fratricidal misrule, when the 'People's Republic of China' emerged, the success saga was nothing short of a rocket launch. It was swift, loaded and straight into the sky with no stops whatsoever.

Only, the 'success', became an addiction and the 1949-born People's Republic of China turned this addict who wanted a dose progressively higher than the one consumed earlier.

With about 1.4 billion mouths to feed, and the number growing every day, Chinese aggression can well be looked on humanitarian grounds too. But then, that would take an entirely different mindset that's removed from black and white approach. When it comes to China, grey seems to be the theme color. And the color grey comes in, probably, a million shades here.

The time is apt for the Chinese dragon to spew fire too. The world's attention is focused on terrorism, and leaders are lost spying on each other. When the world is watching the reruns of World Trade Centre crumbling like a house of cards, and battling the 'Mouzlem Sponsorrrred Terrorism'; China slowly slithers into smaller states of neighboring countries, sets foot on deserted islands with oil reserves and riches and keeps a watch on claimants. Shoot at sight, is the only law of any land China has aggressively made its own.

China has an eye for riches, any riches. Be it the natural resources, fertile stretch of land, or oil reserves, China senses it way before the world can, and then the usual plan of action follows. The United States may have hoisted a flag on the moon. But, Chinese flags are turning out to be the most frequently seen ones on earth.

Be it Tibet, which China usurped nearly three decades ago forcing the people to flee their motherland and seek asylum in India; or the most recent Scarborough Shoal off-Philippines, China will continue to claim lands and islands, using its mighty military power. After all, the most populated country in the world needs to create job opportunities, along with finding new abodes for its men to live. United Nations can watch in awe and criticize. But, China will hear none of that. There have been instances when the country's officials have scoffed at the concerns expressed by United States officials, no matter how 'powerful' is the office they come from, and continue its tirade. Hidden behind those innocent-hardly-open Chinese eyes is the aggression, and most calculated thinking you will never be able to read.

The United States is on a bit of a sticky wicket on this issue of opposing China since the country itself has benefited a lot from the new found economical success and industrialization that has put the dragon nation on a consistent trajectory of growth. Chinese economic growth is stunning for the world and tempting for others to follow. And, most obviously, the United States stands to be the biggest beneficiary from the Chinese abuse of land and natural resources. This is where the stuff on the shelves of supermarkets in the US comes from. The computers come from here and so do the lingerie. What's more, US satiates its sexual urge with life-size dolls from China!

The average Chinese are hard working and dedicated; culturally aware, and decidedly torn by identity. They are born in huge numbers and get baptized simultaneously when they learn about Buddha's ideologies. A Sino identity also has a Christian angle to it. Because, the world cannot get a hang of pronouncing Chinese names.

Hence, it's imperative to adapt to the 'market'; so what if that sends a crack from within? It's for the good of the economy, right? When you meet a Chinese, you actually meet two people. A Sino whose name would mean something in his/her language, and then a Christian. Just for the convenience of the world.

The country has posted impressive growth rate over the last three decades, immediately after it snapped out of the Cultural Revolution.

The land of ever-growing population has turned what could be its biggest handicap into its strength too. The millions of mouths that need to be fed also make for the most committed labor force in the world. Hence, an annual growth rate of 7.5, a dream figure for most other countries to achieve consistently, including the United States, turns into a reality - year after year.

But, what lies behind the veil of success and consistent growth rate is a China that is choking on its own emesis. In the recently captured images, NASA showed the dangerous levels of pollution in China that was altering the living conditions of the country. One of the Chinese cities Harbin was engulfed in such dense fog that the visibility was affected beyond 10 meters. The authorities had to shut the city down and suspend schools and colleges, clear the traffic snarls over long hours, and close the airport over the smog.

The cause behind the smog was attributed to industrial pollution, coal and agricultural burning which was trapped in the mountains. The NASA images captured the color of smog to be close to murky green, which is well beyond tolerable limits.

Few days before the smog began to accumulate over the city of Harbin, hospitals reported a whopping 30 per cent increase in admissions. People suffered from respiratory problems, and there was absolutely nothing the authorities could do about it, except for waiting for the fog to clear.

Behind the rosy success of China lies a story of the dying youth. Increasing number of people are suffering from cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer. Over-exposure to television and gadgets is leaving the young obese and lethargic. With this being the future, it is time China looked inward for growth. Else, there would not be much of a population left to be tended to.