THE BLOG

Will She, Won't She? Hillary Keeps Her Plans on Oval Office Under Wraps

29/01/2014 10:59 GMT | Updated 30/03/2014 10:59 BST

It's not official yet. But, when you closely observe the subtle shifts in power corridors within the offices of Democrats and Republicans in the mighty United States of America, there seems to be a definite drift to candidatures. Two independent candidates: Tami Stainfield and Samm Tittle have already made their candidature known for the Presidential elections in 2016.

However, this news has not created much of a difference in the political circles in the USA though. While both the women are perfect candidates to run for the office of President of the USA, excitement is still an undercurrent since not many major names have made public their inclination to run for the oval office so far.

Yet, campaigns are slowly but surely being drawn up. Strategies are being worked out. Groups are enrolling volunteers for what would be known as the biggest battle for the highest office in America. After President Obama's initial astounding story of success, almost making it look like a journey from grass roots to galaxies, it is time for America to perhaps choose its first woman president.

Will Hillary Clinton break the glass ceiling and catapult herself to occupy the most powerful position, that of the President of United States of America, much to the relief of women activists, and a lot to the chagrin of her opponents?

Though she has not admitted it in a candid manner, speculations are rife that the 'Queen Bee' a ka Mrs Bill Clinton is certain to run for the oval office. But, do we see definite signs of it? Nope, she is not the one will let the cat out of the bag yet. Latest news reports are laden with ambiguous statements issued by Hillary, hidden behind the know-it-all kinda smile. "I am not thinking about it (running for the oval office). I have tried to get other people not to think about it. I will think about it, you know, in the future sometime," said the 66-year-old former state secretary who quit the office over health concerns. When asked about the probability of her having to contest the upcoming Presidential elections, Hillary Clinton continued: "But, right now let's deal with what we have to do to continue building on our success". So, is that a yes or a no? It's a simple 'may be' with a definite YES lurking between the words.

Mysteriously enough, there's a political action committee called 'Ready for Hillary' had emerged around February last year. The PAC had close pals and aides of Hillary Clinton who have understood her journey into American power corridors extremely well.

In creating an aura of power, and a circle of strength, and including every person who has walked the power path with them, comes rather naturally to Clintons. So when President Clinton ran for the big office, they followed the same pattern - collecting friends right from Bill's kindergarten classes to ensuring the last person whom they met at Yale Law School and beyond was there to add strength to the whole campaign.

While the other women candidates in America are building their poll strategy on their political career and preparing for the debates on television, ensuring the entire world gets to know of their knowledge prowess, Hillary has lost a bit of a path given her tryst with the already-powerful image.

What can the campaigns and publicity machinery do, to enhance her image which is seen as a 'personally and politically fraught' one right now? Well, the focus need not be on how much 'experience' she already possesses, which can also work as a major drawback given her tryst with the power, owing to her two most powerful positions. One being the President's wife, and another being the State Secretary in Obama's government.

Third one, that of a Presidential candidate, isn't easy. Though Hillary showed all signs of making it tough for Obama to run for the office from within the Democratic party circles in 2008 during primary presidential campaigns, she conceded and made way for Obama to post magnificent victory. Two terms over for Obama, Hillary had to leave the government owing to health concerns.

The contest is clear. Hillary is the most familiar candidate among the runners for President. But, will that be enough to make her look like the one who wants to serve people, than a person who is 'entitled' for the office? Voters' scales will tip depending on this image-building. Will Ready for Hillary pull it off? Let's wait and watch!