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Pop Culture And Politics: Exclusive Interview With Goldie Lookin' Chain

26/09/2016 12:01

It might be all over for Brangelina but pop culture and politics is the power couple that's here to stay.

It is perhaps a headline more suited to tabloid newspaper, worthy even of a Kim Kardashian #B!*chPlease GIF, as admittedly, they seem even less likely bedfellows than Nigel Farage and his German wife.

However, the pop-politics relationship is official and there won't be a conscious un-coupling any time soon.

With this in mind who better to track down in Episode 2 of Pokepolitics, than hip hop legend Rhys Hutchings, who effortlessly blends his role as frontman of Welsh rap collective Goldie Looking Chain, with his political career as councillor for Newport's St Julians ward.

I sat down with Rhys in an exclusive interview on Pop, Politics and Prime Ministers.

As Rhys points out GLC is a parody act, a collective of witty pranksters who infuse their comedic lyrics with clever observations.

This of course is the power of parody.

Do I really have politicians trapped in my itchy balls?

Do I really believe that Theresa May will trigger article 50 "with a gun..in a Tupac drive-by situation?"

I'll leave you to figure out that one yourself.

It's not all one big joke however, not when the PM's own statements about triggering article 50 are as equally ludicrous as mine.

In a recent EU summit, European Council President Donald Tusk, reported that Theresa May stated it was "almost impossible to trigger Article 50 this year, but it's quite likely that they will be ready maybe in January, maybe in February, next year."

'Quite likely' 'maybe January' 'maybe February'

The PM's non-committal comments are almost laughable. Sadly she is no parody act.

It may seem like a joke. Only it's no laughing matter.

The UK's departure from Europe saw the voice of the young crushed by the vote of the older generation.

A viral Youtube compilation, with 50k Facebook shares, of Theresa May's face to haunt you as much her restrictive immigration policies, may seem trivial. However underneath the comedy lies important political content which reaches the younger generation.

Chuck D of Public Enemy once stated that Hip-Hop was the "black CNN." Perhaps in the current climate of Brexit, where the voice of the young was outvoted by the older generations, Facebook is the millennial mouthpiece.

Goldie Lookin Chain's own Brexit parody song Auf Weidersen Mate amassed over 120,000 youtube views proving the power of comedy to share serious ideas.

It is startlingly clear that the Conservative government never had a post Brexit plan in place.

We were torn from Europe by a government scrabbling for votes.

A government that cared more about it's own hold on power than the welfare of it's people.

A government that fed off the anger of a nation, who had been crushed by austerity, who had been bombarded by tabloid misinformation and desensitised to the xenophobic rhetoric vocalised in the mainstream media and by the government itself.

But this government can be held accountable, for this is the the millennial age.

So go on, pick up your tabloid, scroll through the side bar of shame, share, like, comment and subscribe, click, watch, engage and go viral.

This is the millennial age age, where pop culture can peel back political propaganda and share the truth with millions, with the click of a button.

After all 'guns don't kill people rappers do.' Right?

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