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Wearing Makeup Isn't Empowering

24/05/2016 10:11 | Updated 24 May 2016

There's an awful lot that can empower you these days. Shower gel, pants and even socks are being held up as things that allow us to assert our rights. To a certain extent, this can be true. The physical expression of who we are can allow us to be noticed, taken seriously and even challenge stereotypes. Where I draw the line (a metaphorical one around my eyes which makes me look cross) is at the idea that wearing makeup is an empowering statement. It really isn't.

I was reading a review for 'Room' the other day, when one particular sentence caught my eye. "She [Brie Larsson] appears almost feral in 'Room,' without makeup and unwashed hair." Feral, really? I'm pretty sure that's just most women on a Sunday morning, not some wild and untamed animal lurking in the bushes waiting for prey. Expecting a woman to wear makeup in order to look normal is all the proof you need that it isn't an empowering act.

But this is very often how it is sold. From 'giving you confidence' to 'covering up that great night out from your boss,' the language used to sell these products is very often skewed around this idea that you are taking control, sticking it to the man, even, by wearing that particular shade of blusher. Apparently it can even have positive psychological effects. This language is being used by massive cosmetic companies to manipulate women into thinking they are making a statement by covering their face up.

Gaining control over the thing that oppresses you is very important. Reclaiming sexist, homophobic and racist language and using it as a way to spread a message is very powerful. It takes the words and images that have so long been used to keep you in a certain space, and marks them out as your own. However, I'm not sure the same can be said for wearing eyeliner.

You only have to look at a social experiment into going without makeup to see what is considered 'normal' for women. Going without slap is called 'brave,' as if bearing your naked face to the world is some sort of act of defiance. People were told how tired they looked at work, were asked if they were ok. We are so used to seeing women's faces as 'normal' when they have been doctored and enhanced by cosmetic products that we think someone is having an off day when they're not wearing it.

Which leads to shocking double standards in the workplace. From the recent furore over a woman being sacked over refusing to wear high heels, it is clear that standards are demonstrably skewed for men and women. The same is true for makeup. There is some weird association that has arisen around the beauty rituals of women, that if they fail to present their face in a cosmetically-enhanced way they have 'let themselves go,' or they 'haven't made an effort.' This is absurd. Choosing whether or not to wear makeup has no bearing on your professionalism or your respect for those around you.

Don't get me wrong, there are days when I thank the god of L'Oreal for allowing me to cover up some godawful spot or to put a bit of fake cheeriness in my cheeks when I'm feeling crap. It must be hard for most men. Sure, they could colour in their eyebrows (I still don't know why that's a thing) or put mascara on to make their eyes really zing, but it might not be met with the same sort of enthusiasm. But judging me by wearing it at all? That's when it's not ok.

Make up only enhances one aspect of you. Your physical appearance. Which does nothing more than accentuate the level to which you are judged by it. Contouring does not enhance your intellect, a nice shade of eyeshadow does not highlight your practical or social skills. All it does is enhance the physical you. A tiny element of who you are as a person.

Let's not forget the reason makeup exists. It is to airbrush the face, present a sexualised and 'flawless' face that is considered acceptable and desirable within social norms. Don't be fooled into thinking you are a special gem who has decided to wear a shocking shade of red in order to get back at the patriarchy. If you want to wear make-up, go ahead. But don't pretend that I'm making a bold statement for feminism. You're not.

Cross-post from https://sarahtinsley.com/2016/05/23/wearing-makeup-isnt-empowering/

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