THE BLOG

Media led racism

31/03/2016 11:29 | Updated 31 March 2016

Since the attacks in Belgium, there have been two significant terrorist attacks. The first; a football match in Iraq where ISIS detonated a suicide bomb killing around 32, and the second, more recently, was in Lahore (Pakistan) where currently the death toll stands at around 80 and the injured toll at around 300. This is what I know. I'm sure there are more brutal and horrific atrocities happening everyday inside Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, and Pakistan that I, as a European, will never really hear about on the news.

What we can talk about, is what we do know from the news. So what do we know? We know that two significant tragedies have happened since Belgium's awful terrorist attacks, and nothing has been done to highlight these tragedies in the same light as Belgium.

Scroll down your Facebook feed after any terrorist attack, small or large scale on Europe, and you will see an outpour of support and concern. Look down your feed after an attack of small or large scale in the Middle East or elsewhere and you will see, well, nothing. No Facebook profile pictures being changed, no messages of support, no flags, no nothing.

Why?

Is the truth too unpleasant to be faced? Is it because we are all ignorant racists that care more about the lives of white-bred Europeans than we do of Arabs, Asians, or Africans? Has the Western media conditioned us to accept large scale terrorism in the Middle East as a fact of life -- as if we actually believe that people there are less affected by death because they are used to seeing, living, and breathing terrorism. It breaks my heart to look on social media, and news websites after terrorist attacks in the Middle East and see such underwhelming shows of support.

What kind of people are we? I, for one am ashamed, disgusted, and disappointed in what we have become as a white egocentric race. We claim to care; we claim that all lives matter, we claim to love this world. It is a rotten lie. Some lives matter more than others. Our news coverage, our compassion, and our action reflect this awful fact.

I've been to Afghanistan, a country that has been ravaged by war for more generations than I know. They are affected by terrorist attacks, they are heart broken, they do cry, they do fall apart at the sight of violence. Telling me that Belgium or Paris is closer to home, or on our front doorstep is a disturbing way to justify the egocentrism and racial bias with which we comfortably and blissfully live.

Read the news, show support, share stories, start dialogues, and stop pretending to care - instead recognize the blinders that we wear, for only then can we take them off and share a common compassion for all people; even those who do not look like us.

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