UK
18/11/2013 12:48 GMT | Updated 18/11/2013 12:49 GMT

Photographer Captures Unseen Devastation of Typhoon Haiyan On His Phone (PICTURES)

Deep into the heart of the wreckage wrought by Typhoon Haiyan, photographer David Guttenfelder is telling the story of the people whose lives and homes were devastated by the storm

The photographer for the Associated Press has documented some of the most heartbreaking sights in the storm-ravaged nation using his camera phone. He then uploads his images to Instagram.

One of his most striking images is of Althea Mustacisa, born three days ago in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Unable to breathe on her own, her young parents and medics have been hand-pumping oxygen into lungs non-stop and round the clock since she was born.

The bottom floor of the two-story government-run Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center was flooded, and the intensive care unit for new-borns was destroyed, along with life-saving equipment like its incubator.

Doctors and staff have taken 20 babies from the unit to a small chapel for safety, placing some of them on the tiny church alter, Guttenfelder reported.

A mother rests with her newborn baby in a church pew at a chapel inside a hospital in Tacloban, Philippines

The photographer, who is the chief photographer in Asia for the news agency, has previously snapped in Afghanistan and Iraq, winning the 2013 International Center for Photography Infinity Award for Photojournalism.

A boy plays in the street in the Typhoon Haiyan destroyed town of Tacloban

Guttenfelder recently travelled to North Korea, when foreigners were for the first time given access to the Internet on their mobile phones using service provider Koryolink.

The Typhoon Haiyan destroyed village of Maraboth

"I feel I can help open a window into a place that would otherwise rarely be seen by outsiders," Guttenfelder said of his trip to the secretive communist nation.

"As one of the few international photographers who has ever had regular access to the country, I feel a huge responsibility to share what I see and to show it as accurately as I can."