04/06/2015 07:49 BST | Updated 04/06/2015 08:59 BST

Man Having Brain Surgery Wows Doctors By Playing Beatles' Song 'Yesterday' On Guitar

A Brazilian man has stunned the world after performing a rendition of 'Yesterday' by The Beatles during open brain surgery.

Anthony Kulkamp Dias, 33, was wide awake throughout his surgery and serenaded doctors while they removed a tumour from his brain.

Doctors told G1 Brasil that they asked Dias to sing so that they can monitor his cerebral activity and avoid damaging areas of the brain which control sense, movement and speech - this is also known as "cerebral monitoring".

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The 33-year-old bank worker strummed his guitar while singing along to 'Yesterday' by The Beatles, 'Emanuel' - a song he'd composed following the birth of his son - and a number of other Brazilian country songs.

Meanwhile, behind a surgical sheet, doctors operated on his brain.

Kulkamp Dias, who was a professional musician for 20 years, discovered the tumour a fortnight after his son was born.

He told G1 Brasil: "I played six songs at determined moments.

"My right hand was a bit weaker because that was the side that they were operating on. So I stopped and rested.

"I was interspersing songs and talking with them."

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A spokesperson for Nossa Senhora da Conceição hospital, where the surgery was performed, added that Kulkamp Dias' serenade "surprised everyone".

Dr Jean Abreu Machado, clinical director at the hospital, emphasised the importance of keeping the patient awake during the surgery so that his brain could be monitored in real-time.

"It really is a great challenge for the whole surgery team, including the anaesthetist," said Dr Machado.

This is because the brain tissue does not have pain sensors, but the skin and surrounding structures do.

He added: "At this point, the anaesthetist’s challenge begins: to keep the patient awake and pain-free."

And it looks like they succeeded!