STUDENTS
29/10/2015 13:10 GMT | Updated 09/05/2016 10:59 BST

Meet Student Brooke Purvis, Who's Burning His Student Loan In Protest Against Capitalism

Meet art student Brooke Purvis. He'll be setting fire to his entire student loan in the hope of demonstrating currency no longer has value.

The 24-year-old, who was offered an unconditional offer from Central Saint Martins, said it was "like I'd won the lottery" when he was accepted onto the course.

On his blog, Reading-born Purvis posted an in-depth email interview he had with a Vice journalist. He writes: "We rarely see money now, credit and debit cards and now apple pay. You have fractional reserve banking too which literally magics money out of thin air, But also I'd like people to consider where money comes from and what it actually is."

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Purvis with some of the money he is planning to burn

Speaking about his 'Everything burns' project, which will happen in 2016, he explains: "Everything burns has been an idea I've been toying with for the past few years. The idea that in today's society a person, who wants to better themselves, has to undertake a huge amount of debt seems unfathomable.

"Money or currency, in the U.K at least holds absolutely no value whatsoever, other than that which you place upon it, for instance, it took you whatever amount of time to earn whatever amount of money which can buy you whatever it is you desire."

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Purvis practising with some fire

Purvis adds: "So, for me, when I realised that money is simply a fiction and a fixation of the mind and that people need a material object to understand somethings existence, my own reality had been altered. Therefore burning money would be a release from the bondages that society and our own minds have placed upon us all.

"It's my money, remembering it's a fiction, and like anyone, I choose to do what I want with it."

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Purvis, contemplating

Far from being well-off, Purvis works "practically full time" so he can cover the rent of the house he shares with 11 other people.

He adds: "I personally don't believe that since the age of roughly about 7 or 8 years old I've ever experienced what your average person would consider a comfortable life without fear of not making a rent payment or having enough for food or some maniacal person demanding something from me for there [sic] own gains."

Read the full interview here.