David Lammy

Labour MP for Tottenham and former Minister for Higher Education and Skills

David Lammy is the Labour MP for Tottenham and former Minister for Higher Education and Skills.

Long bio: David Lammy is the Member of Parliament for Tottenham. Born in Tottenham to Guyanese parents, David was raised by a single mother. At eleven years of age, he won a scholarship as a chorister to attend The Kings School in Peterborough. He went on to study law at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), was admitted to the Bar of England and Wales, and became the first Black Briton to study a Masters in Law at the Harvard Law School.

In government, David served as a Minister in the Department of Health, the Department of Constitutional Affairs, and as Minister for Culture in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Most recently he served as the Minister for Skills and the Minister of State for Higher Education. He is also a member of the Privy Council.

David is the author of Out of the Ashes: Britain After the Riots, a book about the reasons behind the 2011 London riots and what has to be done to prevent something similar happening again.

He lives in Haringey, London with his artist wife and two young sons.
Why I Voted Against Triggering Article

Why I Voted Against Triggering Article 50

So I cannot vote for a motion that supports the government's Brexit timetable. We have heard time and time again from the Brexit Secretary, that "there will be no running commentary" on the Government's Brexit plans. But in reality we have had a running commentary of sorts - just not one that has been willingly provided by the Government.
08/12/2016 12:10 GMT
Ten Years on From 7/7, I Remain Proud of London's Fierce Display of Unity and Strength on That Dark

Ten Years on From 7/7, I Remain Proud of London's Fierce Display of Unity and Strength on That Dark Day

As we reflect, ten years on, on a dark day in London's history, we remember our city's proud history of dealing with whatever is thrown at it and look forward, together, to doing the same with the current challenges we face and those that are bound to confront us in the years ahead. For London is, at its very best, a place of optimism, of hope and of an age-old determination to build a future that is brighter than the past.
07/07/2015 11:05 BST
London's Housing Debate Needs to Include All

London's Housing Debate Needs to Include All Voices

In short, we hear what journalists and politicians think the issues are and and how it affects Londoners - but we don't hear enough from Londoners themselves. And it is only by having an inclusive debate with all parties allowed a voice, that we will together take the tough decisions needed to tackle the London housing crisis.
28/11/2014 17:09 GMT
We Are Witnessing a Crisis of Wellbeing at

We Are Witnessing a Crisis of Wellbeing at Work

We are witnessing a crisis of wellbeing at work. Official statistics paint a picture of a nation that is stressed, anxious, overworked and insecure. UK employees work some of the longest hours in Europe, and over half of them are worried about losing their jobs. Far from being the price we pay for a competitive economy, this is economically disastrous: sickness absence alone costs the economy an estimated £100billion a year, and longer hours are associated with worse productivity. Our relentless search for growth is not only destroying the quality of our lives: it's failing even on its own terms.
13/10/2014 16:57 BST
We Must Begin a More Open, Honest Debate on

We Must Begin a More Open, Honest Debate on Housing

People are capable of understanding the trade offs and difficult decisions that need to be made to tackle the housing crisis - but too often politicians aren't being straight with the public on housing. If we are to make serious progress toward solving the housing crisis in London, proposals like Shelter should be required reading.
11/09/2014 09:54 BST
Televising High Profile Cases Would Be to Everyone's

Televising High Profile Cases Would Be to Everyone's Benefit

Why is it that in Britain our criminal courts remain untelevised? Why is it that high profile cases - like the current phone hacking trials in the Old Bailey, which has huge repercussions for our democracy and will be closely followed around the world - can only be conveyed to us as second-hand information?
04/03/2014 09:47 GMT
London Needs Its Own Minimum

London Needs Its Own Minimum Wage

A London minimum wage may not be a panacea for all poverty in the capital, but it will provide a number of families with increased financial stability, and it will do so without jeopardising London's job market.
19/11/2013 17:33 GMT