NEWS
08/10/2021 09:20 BST

Brexit Voter Stuns Question Time's Fiona Bruce With The Most Anti-Brexit Take

The audience member said it was "ironic" that the current crises were due to Brexit.

BBC Question Time
BBC presenter Fiona Bruce interacting with an audience member who did vote for Brexit

An audience member surprised BBC Question Time host Fiona Bruce on Thursday evening when they revealed they did vote for Brexit – and said Britain was now facing the dire consequences of leaving the EU.

The panel was discussing the ongoing supply chain issues across the country triggered by a lack of HGV drivers and employees from overseas.

The member of the public said: “I think there’s a bit of an irony now when we’re discussing Brexit because, in my opinion, a lot of people voted Brexit because they didn’t want foreign workers coming over here and taking our jobs.

“And now that’s exactly what we’ve got – we’ve got a lack of foreign workers, which is why we’ve got these shortages.”

Bruce then frowned and said: “Can I just hear from someone who did vote Brexit?”

She added: “The majority here voted for Brexit. We select this audience very carefully to be representative. I’m assuming you didn’t vote for Brexit?”

He replied: “I did, actually.”

Seeming surprised, Bruce then turned away to move the line of questioning on.

The clip was a hit on Twitter when shared by anti-Brexit campaigner Femi Oluwole who dubbed it the “best #BBCQT clip of all time”.

Brexit is believed to be partially responsible for the series of crises the UK has faced in recent weeks.

The lack of fuel at petrol pumps, the empty supermarket shelves and fears of major shortages at Christmas are issues being faced by countries around Europe.

However, leaving the EU has exacerbated the UK’s problems as it meant a wave of overseas workers left Britain.

Prime minister Boris Johnson has depicted the current supply chain issues as teething problems before Britain can evolve into a “high-wage, high skilled” workforce.

In the meantime, a difficult winter is expected ahead as energy prices rise and supermarket goods increase in price.