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The NHS Workers Who Have Lost Their Lives Due To Coronavirus

Medical staff are risking their own lives each day. HuffPost UK has collected tributes to those who have died, from the people who loved and worked with them.

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Every day, thousands of NHS workers bravely head to the frontlines to fight the battle against coronavirus as the pandemic sweeps the UK.

Now, more than ever, medical staff are putting their own lives at risk to save those of their patients.

And Covid-19 has not only taken the lives of thousands of members of the public – but the people battling to save them.

Here are tributes to NHS staff who died after contracting coronavirus – in the words of people who loved and worked with them.

If your loved-one or colleague has died after contracting coronavirus and you would like a tribute to them to be included in this article, please email: uknewsteam@huffingtonpost.com

Poornima Nair

Poornima Nair
Poornima Nair
Twitter

Dr Poornima Nair was a GP at Station View Medical Centre in Bishop Auckland, County Durham.

Her surgery posted on its website that she was a “much loved and valued colleague and friend” who had died after a “prolonged” Covid-19 infection.

It said: “The practice is very sorry to announce to our patients the death of our much loved and valued colleague and friend Dr Poornima Nair.

“Dr Nair passed away after a prolonged Covid-19 illness which she fought with her great strength of character. We are all devastated and upset by this tragic news and hope you will join with us in our thoughts and prayers.”

Practice manager Sarah Westgarth told BBC Look North that Dr Nair “lit up any room she walked into”, calling her “positive, encouraging and so caring to her patients”.

BMA GP committee member Dr Preeti Shukla said on Twitter that the loss of the Bishop Auckland GP was “devastating” - calling her a “well respected colleague” who had been “full of life” and left behind a grieving family.

Phil Rennie

Phil Rennie, a patient transport service care assistant for the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) in Oldham, contracted Covid-19 and died at Fairfield General Hospital in Bury on May 10, the service’s chief executive Daren Mochrie said.

Mochrie said: “Phil leaves his wife Karen, son Adam, and extended family.

“He has been part of the NWAS family since 2015 and has dedicated his career to serving the public, previously working in local authority and public services.

“Phil was extremely proud to work for NWAS, offering comfort and care to those in need.

“Our role is a privileged one, we meet people at their most vulnerable, and I am sure there are many people whose lives were touched by Phil during his career.

“We have been supporting Phil’s family during this terrible time and they are in the thoughts of everyone here at NWAS – our deepest sympathies go out to them. Phil will be sorely missed by us all.

“I would like to thank our hospital colleagues in Fairfield General Hospital for their care, compassion and professionalism while caring for our friend, and I know they will also feel the loss of a colleague from the NHS family.”

Tariq Shafi

Dr Tariq Shafi was the “greatly respected” lead consultant for haematology for 13 years at Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford. His death was announced on May 7.

Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust said in a statement: “With much sadness we confirm the untimely death of our greatly respected and loved colleague, Dr Tariq Shafi.

“Tariq built an amazing team of dedicated clinicians and support workers, placing them and his patients at the heart of everything he did.”

“Tariq will be hugely missed by his patients, his team and all of us here at the trust.

“We send our sincere condolences and sympathies to his family at this tragic time.”

Fiona Johnstone

Fiona Johnstone worked at Biggart Hospital in Prestwick as part of the administration team. Colleagues said she was “valued and highly regarded”. Her death was announced on May 7.

Colleagues said Fiona was a “highly regarded” member of staff.

NHS Ayrshire and Arran chief executive John Burns said: “We are saddened to confirm a member of staff has passed away due to Covid-19.

“Fiona Johnstone was a valued and highly regarded member of our administration team who will be sadly missed.

“Our thoughts are with Fiona’s family, friends and colleagues at this difficult time. “

Jennie Sablayan

Haematology nurse Jennie Sablayan was described as a “much-loved specialist” who had trained in the Philippines before joining University College London Hospital in 2002. A GoFundMe, set up in her memory, said she died on May 5.

Jennie was described by UCLH as an “expert in her field” who treated patients with leukaemia and lymphoma with kindness and dedication.

UCLH chief executive Marcel Levi said: “UCLH staff and patients will remember Jennie for her hard-working and unassuming approach during her 18 years of invaluable service. We will miss her terribly – her humour, her compassion, her friendship and her humbleness in supporting her team and her patients.

“Our thoughts are with her husband Joel and her two children, her friends and other loved ones.”

Julie Edward

Julie Edward
Julie Edward
PA

Nurse Julie Edward died on May 4 with coronavirus, according to a GoFundMe page for her family, having worked at the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading since 2017.

The trust commended her “kindness and dedication to her job”.

Royal Berkshire (RBH) NHS Foundation Trust chief executive Steve McManus said: “We are deeply saddened to report the death of nurse Julie Edward who had worked at the Trust since 2017.

“She was a much loved and valued colleague and touched on the lives of many who worked alongside her at the Royal Berkshire Hospital.

“Her kindness and dedication to her job and patients was clear and she will be very sadly missed.”

Onyenachi Obasi

Onyenachi Obasi
Onyenachi Obasi
Supplied

Onyenachi Obasi, a “dedicated and loving” nurse, has died from Covid-19 some five weeks after first being placed on a ventilator.

Her death was confirmed by family members on 9 May.

The 51-year-old had been working as a health visitor and nurse in Barking and Dagenham and her family said she “gave her life doing what she loved”.

Her niece, Ijeoma Uzoukwu, said: “We are just heartbroken. She was really loving, really sweet and a really cute person.

“She was a good example of unconditional love and just loved everyone. She was so giving and always had an ear — she took people as they were.

“She loved her job, but that is what caused her to fall ill in the first place.”

Augustine Agyei-Mensah

Augustine Agyei-Mensah
Augustine Agyei-Mensah
Supplied

Augustine Agyei-Mensah, a learning disabilities nurse at the Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, died after receiving treatment for Covid-19.

The death of the father-of-four was confirmed by the trust on May 7.

“Augustine epitomised what we stand for here at NHFT. He was committed to making a difference and giving people a second chance,” said chief executive Angela Hillery.

“Augustine cared for some of the most vulnerable in our society; lives have been transformed because of him.”

In a statement, his family describe d him as a “caring husband and loving father”.

“We are devastated by his loss. He was a dedicated, hard working and proud NHS worker who will be missed by all who knew him.”

Eleuterio ‘Boy’ Gibela

Eleuterio Gibela, 68, who died after contracting coronavirus
Eleuterio Gibela, 68, who died after contracting coronavirus
PA

Staff at the Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust have paid their respects to Eleutrio “Boy” Gibela – “a true gentleman”.

The death of the 68-year-old, who was part of the domestic services team, was confirmed by the trust on May 4.

In a message to staff and patients, chief executive Kevin McGee said: “It is with deep regret and huge sadness that I share with you the devastating news that we have lost a friend and colleague to the terrible Covid-19 virus.

“Eleuterio was a valued, well respected member of the team who will be greatly missed by all of us and we send our heartfelt condolences to his wife Deborah and daughters Louella Anne and Kristiana.”

Meanwhile Beverley Thistlethwaite, one of Eleutrio’s colleagues, said his loss had deeply touched the team.

“He was a true gentleman, always smiling and happy, and was dedicated to doing his duties,” she said.

“He often brought us in homemade snacks giving us a little taste of the Philippines cuisine and when he visited his home country, he brought little souvenirs back for the office team.

“To lose one of our own team is incredibly hard but we all feel very privileged to have known him. Heaven has certainly gained a very special angel.”

Mark Piggott

Photo issued by Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust of Mark Piggott, the Head of Capital Projects and Programmes at Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust, who has died after treatment for Covid-19 at Sandwell General Hospital
Photo issued by Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust of Mark Piggott, the Head of Capital Projects and Programmes at Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust, who has died after treatment for Covid-19 at Sandwell General Hospital
PA

The death of Mark Piggott, a manager at Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust and a “dedicated family man”, was confirmed by the NHS on May 2.

Mark, who was responsible for leading capital projects and programmes at the trust after joining in 2019, died following treatment for Covid-19.

Colleagues described him as an “all-round great guy” who would leave a big hole in the team.

Meanwhile, Mark’s wife Julie said: “Mark was a great family man, a loving husband and fantastic dad to our sons Daniel and Alex. We’re devastated to have to say good-bye to him.”

Trust chief executive Sarah-Jane Marsh said that Mark’s impact on the organisation was “immense”.

“We already considered him an important part of our BWC family,” she said, despite the fact he only joined the trust last year.

“Mark: thank-you for everything you did in your short time with us, and we promise to stay true to your values, and fight even harder for the new facilities we dreamed of together.

“May you rest in peace and may God bless you and your loved ones always.”

Ray Lever

Handout photo issued by Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust of domestic services assistant Ray Lever at Northern General Hospital, who has died with Covid-19, the Trust said.
Handout photo issued by Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust of domestic services assistant Ray Lever at Northern General Hospital, who has died with Covid-19, the Trust said.
PA

“Genuinely lovely” domestic services assistant Raymond Lever – known to family and friends as ‘Ray’ – died on May 1 after contracting coronavirus.

His three daughters Rachel, Kathryn and Rebecca said he was “the perfect dad and grandad”.

“Nothing was ever too much trouble for him if it meant helping someone else,” they said. “He was always cheerful and loved a laugh and joke.

“Our world will never be the same but we are so grateful for the unbelievable care he received from the teams at Sheffield Hospitals for his current illness and on previous occasions.”

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – where Ray had worked for a number of years – said he was transferred to work in non-patient areas following the outbreak of Covid-19 in the UK.

Trust chief executive Kirsten Major said: “Ray had dedicated a number of years of his life to the NHS here in Sheffield and his family can be justifiably proud that he made a difference to people’s lives each and every single day.

“He was a genuinely lovely, kind man who put others before himself in his personal and work life and we were very fortunate to have someone like him as part of our team,” she said. “He was a credit to the NHS”.

Cecilia Fashanu

“Superwoman” nurse Cecilia Fashanu died aged 63 on April 30 after contracting Covid-19.

The agency nurse, who had worked at the Cumberland Infirmary for the past two years, died at the hospital after receiving critical care for a “number of weeks”.

Cecilia’s son Anthony said she was “passionate about people, helping others, selfless and always willing to go out of her way to ensure everyone was comfortable”.

“Nothing was too much for mum,” he said. “Even at times when she was tired and we asked her to take a break, she would always say: ‘I’m ok – God gives me strength.’

“Mum is our Superwoman, an extraordinary woman, devoted Christian.”

Lyn Simpson, chief executive of the North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust, said: “Cecilia will be sorely missed by her husband and children.

“Cecilia had been an agency nurse covering shifts on a number of wards at the Cumberland Infirmary over the last two years. She was a much loved colleague and her death is felt across the organisation as a whole.”

Nasir Khan

Handout photo issued by Go Fund Me of hospital consultant Dr Nasir Khan who died after contracting Covid-19
Handout photo issued by Go Fund Me of hospital consultant Dr Nasir Khan who died after contracting Covid-19
PA

The death of consultant Nasir Khan – a father of three – after he contracted Covid-19 was confirmed by the NHS on April 30.

Nasir, a locum doctor who worked at the Dewsbury and District Hospital, was admitted to hospital in Bolton on April 6.

His son Mahad Ali Khan described him as a “loving, caring and much-loved father, husband, son, brother and friend”.

“He was compassionate, humble and loyal,” he said. “He had always put his family and friends before himself and was extremely giving. He would always look for the slightest of excuses to help those in need.”

Mahad added: “We strive to achieve the greatness that was my dad and fulfil the dreams he has left behind. Miss you dad!”

Martin Barkley, chief executive of the Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, said Nasir had joined the trust six months before.

During this time, he had become a “very well-liked and valued member of the team”, Martin said.

“He also showed fantastic leadership: he was absolutely dedicated to the well-being of the junior staff he was working with, and his thoughtfulness and considerate manner shone out to everyone who met him.”

Martin added: “We consider ourselves very fortunate to have had such a doctor as Dr Khan working for the Trust, and we are all devastated to learn of his death. It is impossible to put into words how much our hearts go out to his family and friends.”

Philomina Cherian

Photo issued by Joseph Varkey of Philomina Cherian, 63, who passed away with coronavirus at Oxford's John Radcliffe Hospital
Photo issued by Joseph Varkey of Philomina Cherian, 63, who passed away with coronavirus at Oxford's John Radcliffe Hospital
PA

Popular and hugely valued” Oxford nurse Philomina Cherian died on April 30 due to Covid-19.

She died at John Radcliffe Hospital, where she worked as a staff nurse on the acute assessment unit.

Chief nursing office Sam Foster said Philomina, who was originally from Kerala in India, was cared for “with the utmost love, care and attention” during her time in hospital.

“I wanted to express that at this very sad time our thoughts are with the family of Philomina, as well as with her friends and colleagues throughout the Trust,” Sam said.

“She was an incredibly caring friend and colleague who will be terribly missed by us all.

“Many of you will have known her and worked closely with her and I ask you to remember how she wonderfully cared for her patients and her colleagues, acting as an exemplar nurse to all who met her.”

Philomina’s husband Joesph Varkey told the BBC: “She dedicated her career to helping save lives, even though she had diabetes and, recently, asthma.

“Many people contacted the family regarding the sad news, showing that Philomina was beloved by many and will always be remembered.”

Mike Brown

Hospital linen porter Mike Brown died on April 29 aged 61 after contracting coronavirus.

The University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, where Mike had worked for two decades, said he had suffered from an underlying health condition.

Trust chief executive Paula Head said Mike was known for his humour and for “always going above and beyond” in his role.

“Mike had been with our hospital for 20 years and played a significant role supporting services that enable patients to receive great care and experiences,” Paula said, describing him as “well-recognised and popular” among staff.

“Our thoughts are with Mike’s partner, Sandy, and his family and he will remain fondly in our thoughts, particularly those of his close colleagues and the staff he worked with on the wards regularly.”

Ken Lambatan

Ken Lambatan
Ken Lambatan
Facebook

Nurse Ken Lambatan worked in the cardiology department at St George’s University Hospital’s NHS Trust.

Described as “fit and active”, the 34-year-old died as a result of complications from Covid-19, the trust confirmed on April 28.

Jacqueline Totterdell, chief executive of St George’s Hospital, and Professor Jenny Higham, principal of St George’s, University of London, said: “Everyone at St George’s is deeply saddened by the death of Ken, one of our cardiac research nurses.

“Ken was very popular with staff, and described as a ‘true gem’ by those that knew him well. He was dedicated to his role as a research nurse here at St George’s, and was as popular with his patients as he was with colleagues.

“Our thoughts go out to his family, friends and colleagues at this time.”

Anujkumar Kuttikkottu Pavithran

Anujkumar Kuttikkottu Pavithran
Anujkumar Kuttikkottu Pavithran
Supplied

Staff nurse Anujkumar Kuttikkottu Pavithran, known as Kumar to his colleagues, died on April 27.

He worked at Boston’s Pilgrim Hospital and had tested positive for Covid-19, the local health trust confirmed.

Andrew Morgan, chief executive of the United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “Kumar was a very well liked, professional, respected member of the team and will be greatly missed.

“We are all sending our heartfelt condolences to Kumar’s family, friends and colleagues at this incredibly difficult time.”

Eileen Landers

Hospital cleaner Eileen Landers, who died after contracting Covid-19
Hospital cleaner Eileen Landers, who died after contracting Covid-19
PA

Eileen Landers, a domestic assistant at Queen’s Hospital Burton “with a heart of gold”, died on April 26.

During her 16 years at hospital, Eileen became well known for her “high standards”, said chief executive Gavin Boyle.

“She was known for her absolute dedication to her role and her dedication to coming to clean the hospital and protect patients,” he said.

“The importance of the role Eileen and her colleagues perform simply cannot be overstated,” Gavin added. “Eileen will be sadly missed by the whole UHDB family, especially by the domestic teams that worked closely with her for those many years.”

Eileen’s sister Margaret Landers described how she moved to England from County Tipperary in Ireland when she was in her early twenties, having been born the second youngest of eight children.

“Eileen had a heart of gold and was the most generous person,” Margaret said. “We will all miss her greatly.”

Fiona Anderson

Fiona Anderson
Fiona Anderson
Supplied

Fiona Anderson, a community staff nurse, died on April 26 after testing positive for Covid-19, South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust confirmed.

She joined the Ttust in 2007, working as a staff nurse at Sunderland Royal Hospital and South Tyneside District Hospital before becoming a staff nurse in 2019.

Fiona’s sister Sarah Anderson said: “We are incredibly proud of Fiona, she died doing what she loved, working for the NHS and caring for those in need. Always in our hearts and never forgotten.”

Paying tribute to Fiona and on behalf of her community nursing colleagues, manager Kath Henderson said: “We are all absolutely devastated that we have lost our valued friend and colleague Fiona.

“There are no words that can describe the loss we are all feeling but we take comfort in knowing just how much Fiona loved her job and how incredibly proud she was to be part of the community team and the important work we do caring for patients.

“She brought pride and passion to her work every single day and made such an incredible difference in the lives of so many people in South Tyneside and Sunderland. We will miss you dearly Fiona and will think of you always.”

Dr Vishna Rasiah

Neonatologist Dr Vishna Rasiah worked at Birmingham Women’s and Children’s NHS Foundation Trust.

He died while receiving treatment for Covid-19, the trust confirmed on April 24.

His wife Liza said his family in the UK, Trinidad and Malaysia “meant the world to him”.

“Vish loved his work; to him it was so much more than a job and his colleagues are part of our family too,” she said.

“He treated every patient and family he cared for as his own. I couldn’t have been prouder of him.”

Meanwhile, trust chief executive Sarah-Jane Marsh described Vishna as an “amazing doctor, leader, colleague and friend passionate about the care of babies and their families”.

“Losing him in such a cruel and unfair way will be too much to bear for many of us, in particular anyone involved in neonatal care, and of course his beautiful wife and daughter,” she said.

“As our tears flow, we must always remember the values that Vish stood for, and hold his vision, courage and compassion in our hearts. God bless you Vish, and may you rest in peace.”

Adekunle Enitan

Intensive care nurse Adekunle Enitan – remembered by his family as a “great father and husband” – died on April 24 after contracting coronavirus.

The 55-year-old, who worked at the William Harvey Hospital in Ashford, died in the hospital’s intensive care unit, cared for by the same team he had worked with for five years.

In a tribute, his wife Temitayo, son Martin and daughter Divine said: “Adekunle was a great father and husband who cared deeply for us as well as others around him.

“We are all very thankful for the memories that we shared with him. He is now gone but he will never be forgotten and his spirit will always be beside us.”

Meanwhile, ITU senior sister Yvonne Davis called him an “excellent nurse and a kind and cheery soul with a dry sense of humour”.

“He could always make me laugh,” she said.

Adekunle had recently undertaken a PhD in hospital management.

Yvonne, who was also his PhD mentor, said: “He worked hard for his patients and in his studies. He cared deeply about what he did, coming in on his days off to help develop a new garden for our ITU patients.

“I am proud to have called him my friend. We will all miss him greatly.”

There will be a permanent memorial at the hospital to remember Ade which will be arranged with his family and colleagues.

Ian Reynolds

Undated handout photo issued by Crystal Palace Football Club of paramedic Ian Reynolds who died earlier this week after contracting Covid-19.
Undated handout photo issued by Crystal Palace Football Club of paramedic Ian Reynolds who died earlier this week after contracting Covid-19.
PA

The death of “wise and popular” paramedic Ian Reynolds after he contracted coronavirus was confirmed by the London Ambulance Service on April 24.

The 53-year-old, who worked at New Addington ambulance station, had worked for the service for more than 32 years.

In a statement, the ambulance service described Ian as a “wise, experienced and popular man”.

“He could relate to his colleagues, union members and patients alike – regardless of their background or identity – with an ease that endeared him to everyone he came across,” the LAS said.

“He will be deeply missed by his union comrades, his Croydon ambulance family, his boys Jack and Ben, of whom he was immeasurably proud, and his wife Sian, whom he loved with all his heart.”

As an “avid” Crystal Palace FC fan, Ian was also an “invaluable” member of the Selhurst Park pitch-side medical team.

Dr Amir Pakravan, who worked with Ian at the football club, said: “As a person, he was the best friend you could wish for, always smiling, calm and easy going, and an avid Palace fan.

“As a colleague, he was extremely professional, reliable, approachable, highly experienced and knowledgeable, and always ready to help. He was the complete package and an absolute joy to work with.”

Graham Thorne

The death of “much loved” hospital maintenance worker Graham Thorne was confirmed by Bedford Hospital on April 23.

Graham – who had worked at the hospital for four years – tested positive for Covid-19 after falling ill at the end of March.

David Carter, CEO of Bedfordshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, described him as a “quiet and friendly member of the team who was incredibly diligent at his work and who will be greatly missed”.

“We are saddened to lose another much loved member of the Bedfordshire Hospitals family and our thoughts and condolences are with Graham’s family and colleagues at this incredibly sad time,” David said.

Graham’s partner Debbie Cox told the BBC he was a “quiet, kind, considerate and loving man”.

Medhat Atalla

Dr Medhat Atalla has been described as a "truly gentle gentleman" by his colleagues at Doncaster Royal Infirmary in South Yorkshire.
Dr Medhat Atalla has been described as a "truly gentle gentleman" by his colleagues at Doncaster Royal Infirmary in South Yorkshire.
NHS

Dr Medhat Atalla, a consultant geriatrician at Doncaster Royal Infirmary in South Yorkshire, died after treatment for Covid-19, the hospital said on April 23.

In a statement, Dr Tim Noble, medical director, and Richard Parker, chief executive at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals, said: “A hugely popular and respected colleague, Dr Atalla was a very special human being who practised medicine across three continents throughout his career, affecting the lives of so many in such a positive way.

“He was a truly gentle gentleman and he will be hugely missed by us all.”

The hospital said Medhat became a full-time member of the trust in 2014, when he was appointed as a consultant geriatrician. It said he arrived in Britain from Egypt in the early 2000s.

The statement said: “We would also like to take a moment to thank colleagues who cared for Medhat during his illness, and who did all they could to care for and support him as he bravely battled Covid-19.”

Angie Cunningham

Family handout photo of Angie Cunningham, an NHS nurse who died from Covid-19.
Family handout photo of Angie Cunningham, an NHS nurse who died from Covid-19.
PA

“Much respected” nurse Angie Cunningham died from Covid-19 at the Borders General Hospital in Scotland on April 22.

“Angie was a much loved wife, mother, sister, granny and great granny, as well as a friend to many more,” NHS Borders chief executive Ralph Roberts said in a statement.

“Angie worked in NHS Borders for over 30 years and during this time was a much respected and valued colleague within the hospital, providing amazing care to patients,” he said.

“She was very proud to be a nurse, alongside her love for her family.”

Ann Shepherd

“Inspirational” Derbyshire counsellor Ann Shepherd died aged 80 after contracting Covid-19.

Her death was confirmed by the Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust on April 22.

Ann, who worked in mental health services across the county for 26 years, died in hospital, the trust said. She had underlying health conditions.

Trust chief executive Ifti Majid described Ann as a “wonderful colleague” who was “held in very high esteem by all she worked with”.

“She was truly devoted to her work and her patients and was inspirational in her field,” he said. “She was also a phenomenal character, full of colour and sparkle.”

Even after she was provisionally diagnosed with coronavirus, Ann would still call colleagues to check they were okay, Majid said.

“Ann was a true professional who touched the lives of many,” he added. “She made a tremendous difference to a lot of people’s lives and she was highly respected by patients and colleagues alike.”

In a tribute to Ann, her colleagues at the Moir Medical Centre described her as “more than a work colleague”.

“Her support for other members of the practice team and her contribution to life within the practice were outstanding,” they said. “She could always be relied upon for honest and compassionate advice for patients and staff.

“She had a huge impact on her patients who would speak favourably of their treatment with her for years afterwards. Her enthusiasm for her work was an inspiration to all. She will be sincerely missed.”

Katy and Emma Davis

Family photo of twin sisters Katy (left) and Emma Davis, who died within three days of each other after both testing positive for Covid-19.
Family photo of twin sisters Katy (left) and Emma Davis, who died within three days of each other after both testing positive for Covid-19.
PA

Identical twin sisters Katy and Emma Davis – both of whom had worked as nurses – died within three days of each other after testing positive for Covid-19.

Children’s nurse Katy died at Southampton General Hospital on April 21 while her sister Emma, a former surgery nurse, died on April 24. They were both 37.

The twins, who both suffered from an underlying health condition, have been praised for their excellent work in the nursing profession.

Their sister Zoe Davis told the BBC: “They always said they had come into the world together and would go out together as well.

“There are no words to describe how special they were.”

Zoe said the “amazing” pair, who lived together, had other health conditions and had been unwell for some time.

University Hospital Southampton (UHS) said Katy had worked as risk and patient safety lead in child health while Emma had been a nurse in surgery in the colorectal unit until 2013.

“It goes without saying just how devastating and tragic this is for the family and all who knew them,” said a hospital spokesperson.

“Emma has been described as an excellent nurse who was calm and cheerful and a good leader.

“She was well liked by all and was a valuable member of the team during her time with us.

“We are supporting Katy and Emma’s family as much as we can through this difficult and distressing period.”

Sharon Bamford

Swansea health care assistant Sharon Bamford died on April 21 after contracting coronavirus.

The death of the mother-of-two, described as “warm, caring and dedicated” by her colleagues, came just days after her husband Malcolm also died from Covid-19.

Both were cared for at the intensive unit in Morriston Hospital, the Swansea Bay University Health Board said.

Sharon and Malcolm’s son Christian was also in hospital with coronavirus, but has since been discharged.

Sharon had worked at Singleton Hospital in Swansea for a number of years and as part of the hospital’s haematology and oncology ward since 2005.

Jan Worthing, director of the hospital, said Sharon “was highly thought of by all the patients who have used the services and loved by her colleagues and friends within the team”.

“Sharon’s sad death will leave a massive void within the team and within the Singleton family.

“Our thoughts and condolences are obviously with their sons Craig and Chris at this devastating time, with the loss of both Sharon and Malcolm.

“We offer our most sincere condolences to Sharon’s family, friends and colleagues at this extremely sad time.”

Grant Maganga

Photo issued by Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust of mental health nurse Grant Maganga who has died after contracting coronavirus.
Photo issued by Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust of mental health nurse Grant Maganga who has died after contracting coronavirus.
PA

“Incredibly popular, greatly respected and dedicated” mental health nurse Grant Maganga died after contracting coronavirus.

Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust confirmed the death of the 56-year-old – who leaves behind a wife and four children – on April 21.

Grant had worked at Hurst Place, a rehabilitation unit in Ashton-under-Lyne for men with severe mental health illness and complex needs, since it opened in 2010, having qualified as a mental health nurse the previous year.

Trust chief exec Claire Molloy said Grant was “clearly so very caring with all his patients”.

“The nature of Hurst Place means that staff spend a lot of time with patients, sometimes over many years, and the patients spoke about the countless times where Grant went above and beyond to care for them,” she said.

“His colleagues have also described his great kindness and friendliness, and say that he never had a bad word to say about anyone. They loved his infectious laugh and positivity.”

Grant was a “true gentleman, a great role model and a wonderful human being”, Claire said.

“This is an awful loss and a terrible and poignant reminder of the incredibly difficult situation that we are facing every day to help others.”

Clare Parker, director of nursing, added: “Grant leaves behind a legacy of someone who devoted his nursing career to supporting and caring for people with their mental health and well-being. He touched so many people’s hearts and lives over the course of his nursing career and helped so many patients on their road to recovery.

“We will never forget him.”

Kirsty Jones

Photo of mother-of-two Kirsty Jones, a healthcare support worker for NHS Lanarkshire who died after contracting coronavirus
Photo of mother-of-two Kirsty Jones, a healthcare support worker for NHS Lanarkshire who died after contracting coronavirus
PA

Kirsty Jones – a “selfless and bright” health care support worker from Lanarkshire – died on April 20 after testing positive for Covid-19.

Her husband Nigel described how the 41-year-old mum-of-two “devoted her life to caring for others”, having spent 24 years working for the NHS in Lanarkshire.

“She was a wonderful wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend and nurse,” he said, describing Kirsty as a “constant source of happiness” for those around her, including her sons – Sam, 14, and four-year-old Finlay.

Nigel continued: “Kirsty will be greatly missed by all who knew her. A void has opened in our hearts that will never be filled.

“We will miss you every day, Kirsty, but be sure that we will carry all the wonderful memories we made together forever in our hearts.”

Before the coronavirus outbreak, Kirsty had worked with older people in the community. But when the virus hit the UK, she took up a position in one of the county’s community assessment centres to help the frontline response to Covid-19.

Janice Miles, senior nurse for older people at the University Hospital Wishaw, described Kirsty as “happy, bright and hard-working”.

She said: “She was known and loved by both patients and relatives due to her bubbly character. She was full of fun but was professional at all times. She had a larger than life character and will be sadly, sadly missed by everyone.”

Calum Campbell, chief executive of NHS Lanarkshire, added: “Everyone who has worked with Kirsty over her career can attest to her professionalism, compassion and commitment. She will be very greatly and sorely missed.”

Sadeq Elhowsh

Sadeq Elhowsh
Sadeq Elhowsh
Supplied

Sadeq Elhowsh, 58, an orthopaedic surgeon, died on April 20 after testing positive for coronavirus.

The father-of-four, who had worked for St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust in Merseyside for 17 years, died at Whiston Hospital, a spokesperson for the health trust confirmed.

Friends of Sadeq described him as a “gentleman”, adding that his well-known catchphrase was: “Don’t worry, I will sort it.”

Paying tribute to the healthcare practitioner, his family said: “Sadeq was a wonderful husband, as well as a devoted father, and he dearly loved his family. We cannot put into words the depth of our loss.

“He loved his work and was dedicated to supporting his patients and his colleagues.

“As a family we are extremely appreciative for all the kind words and messages we have received – we would like to take this time to grieve in private.”

Manjeet Riyat

Manjeet Riyat
Manjeet Riyat
PA

Colleagues at the Royal Derby Hospital where Manjeet worked said the doctor was known as “father of the emergency department”.

“Manjeet was one of the first clinical research fellows in the UK and contributed to the birth of academic emergency medicine,” said emergency medicine consultant Susie Hewitt.

“Despite his many achievements, Manjeet was most at home as a highly visible ‘shop floor’ emergency medicine consultant,” she said, describing him as a “generous” person to work with.

“He had that rare gift of maintaining constant joy in the intellectual challenge of clinical medicine, combined with gentle kindness and compassion for his patients.

“He was a powerful advocate for the sickest patients and was well known for his fair, no-nonsense approach.”

She added: “By contrast, Manjeet could be relied upon to lift the mood with his dry humour and sense of fun.”

University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Trust chief executive Gavin Boyle said Manjeet was a “widely respected consultant in emergency medicine nationally”.

“Manjeet was the first A&E consultant from the Sikh community in the country and was instrumental in building the emergency medicine service in Derbyshire over the past two decades.

“He was an incredibly charming person and well-loved. Manjeet knew so many people here across the hospital; we will all miss him immensely.”

Chrissie Emerson

The death of Chrissie Emerson, a health care assistant at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital King’s Lynn, was confirmed on April 20.

“Everyone at QEH is today coming to terms with the devastating news that one of our own healthcare assistants has died after testing positive for Covid-19,” said the hospital’s CEO Caroline Shaw and chair Steve Barnett in a joint statement.

Chrissie was a “valued colleague and much-loved wife to Michael and cherished mother and grandmother”, the pair said.

“We have been in touch with Chrissie’s family to extend our condolences on behalf of everyone at QEH and to offer appropriate support. We have informed our staff about this upsetting news and offered support to those who knew and worked closely with Chrissie.”

Gerallt Davies

Photo issued by Welsh Ambulances Services NHS Trust of paramedic Gerallt Davies who has died after contracting Covid-19.
Photo issued by Welsh Ambulances Services NHS Trust of paramedic Gerallt Davies who has died after contracting Covid-19.
PA

Gerallt Davies – a paramedic at Cwmbwrla Station in Swansea – became the first member of the Welsh Ambulance Service to die after contracting Covid-19 when he passed away on April 20.

Jason Killens, chief executive of the ambulance trust, described the 51-year-old’s death as a “devastating blow to us all”.

“Gerallt, who joined the service in 1994, was not just a valued member of our team but of St John Cymru Wales, where he was national operations officer,” he said.

In 2019, Gerallt was made an MBE for his services to first aid provision in Wales in this role.

Jason added: “Gerallt’s loss will be sorely felt by everyone here at Team WAST, and we extend our heartfelt condolences and deepest sympathies to his family.

“Our focus now is on supporting Gerallt’s family and bereaved colleagues at this very difficult time.”

Patrick McManus

Patrick McManus
Patrick McManus
University Hospitals of North Midlands

“Extremely well-liked” nurse Patrick McManus – who had worked in the NHS for more than 40 years – died after contracting coronavirus, the NHS confirmed on April 20.

Colleagues at County Hospital in Stafford, where he had worked for the past decade, described Patrick as “a loveable character [who] brought kindness and compassion to all his patients”.

Tracy Bullock, chief exec at University Hospitals of North Midlands, added: “He was an exceptional leader and took staff and students under his wing. His big Irish personality will be sorely missed by his friends and colleagues at UHNM.

“Our deepest sympathies are with his family at this very sad time and we thank him for his many years of invaluable service to the trust, to his colleagues and to the patients and families he served.”

Margaret Tapley

Margaret Tapley
Margaret Tapley
Nursing Notes

Margaret Tapley, who had most recently worked in Linfoot Ward at Witney Community Hospital in Oxfordshire, embodied all that is best about NHS staff, her trust said.

The 84-year-old healthcare assistant has been hailed as an inspiration for continuing to work despite the risk she faced.

She died at the Great Western Hospital in Swindon in the early hours of April 19.

A grandmother, she had been determined to carry on her work despite being well past retirement age, and would regularly do night shifts, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust said. She did her final shift on April 10.

Her grandson, Tom Wood – who is a senior nurse in an A&E department – described her as his “inspiration”.

“She was a huge reason as to why I am a nurse today,” he said in a statement shared by the trust. “She took huge pride in her work but was so humble. She embodied the nursing spirit.

“For anyone who worked with her or knew her, that spirit that we all saw and felt lives on in us.”

Sophie Fagan

Sophie Fagan (front row second left)
Sophie Fagan (front row second left)
Homerton Hospital

Sophie Fagan, 78, a hospital support worker who “refused to retire”, died on April 19 after contracting coronavirus in the hospital she spent years working in.

Sophie, who arrived from India in 1961 aged 16 to begin her nurse training, died at Homerton Hospital after working in healthcare in Hackney for more than 50 years.

She had not been on the frontline fighting coronavirus but worked at the Homerton trust in her role supporting carers.

The trust’s chief executive Tracey Fletcher said: “Sophie Fagan was an extraordinary woman and well known across the Homerton site and indeed Hackney for over 50 years.

“Sophie was 78 when she died and still working. She refused to fully retire and although she did reduce her hours she was often to be found meeting relatives and supporting staff in the hospital when she wasn’t due to be. Sophie wanted to make a difference and caring for the elderly was her passion.

“Given her energy, enthusiasm and the fact that she was seemingly ever present on the site, it is hard to believe she qualified as an enrolled nurse in the Eastern Hospital, Hackney, in 1966.”

Sophie worked as a community nurse at the Eastern Hospital until 1981, when she moved to St Leonard’s Hospital day unit. She worked as the day unit organiser at City and Hackney Community Services before transferring to the Homerton in 1998, first as a discharge liaison officer and then as a carers support specialist, a role she held until her death.

Fletcher said: “Her taste for the brightest and most colourful jumpers, her elegance and her ability to talk to everyone and anyone made her stand out in the hospital corridors.

“She was a passionate advocate for the patient and their relatives, exercising influence throughout the discharge process, including advocating for patients’ ongoing care needs to the extent that she often pushed at the boundaries in these discussions on behalf of the patient.

“Sophie set up the Carers Support Network and continued to be actively involved in this. She will be sadly missed by the health care community in Homerton and across Hackney.”

Josephine Peter

Josephine Peter
Josephine Peter
Supplied

Josephine Peter, a nurse at Southport and Formby District General Hospital, died there on April 18 after testing positive for coronavirus.

The mother-of-two was born in South Africa where she trained before moving to the UK. Her husband described Josephine as “my heroine”.

Trish Armstrong-Child, the trust’s chief executive, said: “Josephine, from Hayes, Middlesex, had worked at Southport since February on an agency contract until falling ill in early April. She was a nurse for 20 years and was married with two children.

“Josephine’s husband, Thabo, told me she was passionate, hardworking, always putting others before herself. She was ‘my heroine’, he said.

“Our thoughts are with Josephine’s family at this difficult time and we offer them our sincere condolences.”

James Lock, chief executive of Altrix, the nursing agency that employed Josephine, said: “Josephine was a diligent nurse who was highly regarded and liked by the team.

“She would always go that extra mile and was a pleasure to work with. My team and I send our very best wishes and deepest condolences to Josephine’s family.”

Craig Wakeham

“Much loved” Dorset GP Craig Wakeham died at Dorset County Hospital on April 18 after testing positive for Covid-19.

The 59-year-old GP, who worked at the Cerne Abbas Surgery in Dorchester, was a “devoted husband and father-of-two” and a “champion for rural general practice”, his colleagues said.

He died after fighting the coronavirus in hospital “for many days”, said doctors Jeremy Dobbs and Jenny Bubb, who worked with Craig at the surgery.

“His legacy lives on in our patients who he cared for diligently, and in the good name he built for our surgery,” they added.

Craig was also the chief clinical information officer at NHS Dorset clinical commissioning group. Its chair Dr Forbes Watson called Craig a “valued and committed colleague and friend”.

“Craig was a champion for rural general practice and a pioneer for integrated nursing teams, having lived and worked as a much-loved GP in Cerne Abbas for many years,” he said, describing him as “highly respected” and “liked by everyone who knew him”.

Forbes added: “Craig was passionate about working with local people to improve services for them and was well known for his frequent challenges to us all on their behalf.”

Jenelyn Carter

Jenelyn Carter
Jenelyn Carter
Facebook

NHS healthcare assistant Jenelyn Carter had been working on the wards of Morriston Hospital in Swansea when she contracted Covid-19.

She was treated by her own colleagues after being admitted for the virus but died.

Announcing her death on April 18, Swansea Bay University Health Board paid tribute saying she was “well loved” by patients and colleagues.

A spokesperson said: “We are deeply saddened to report that one of our healthcare assistants who was being treated for Covid-19 has died.

“Jenelyn Carter worked on the admissions ward at Morriston Hospital and was well loved by all her colleagues and patients”.

Mark Madams, Morriston Hospital’s nurse director, said: “Jenelyn would go the extra mile for anyone, and was a lovely caring person inside and out, with a heart of gold.

“We are devastated by her death and offer our sincere condolences to her family and friends.”

Michael Allieu

Michael Allieu
Michael Allieu
Supplied

Michael Allieu, a “larger than life” acute care nurse, died after contracting coronavirus, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust confirmed.

The NHS worker died on April 18 at Homerton Hospital in Hackney, London, where he had worked as a staff nurse since 2007.

Homerton chief executive Tracey Fletcher said: “Michael was a vibrant, larger than life character on our acute care unit, and was well-known and very well-liked throughout the hospital.

“He will be greatly missed by all his colleagues both in the ACU and the wider Homerton Hospital community.

“Our thoughts and condolences are with his family at this sad time.”

Jenny Esson

Jenny Esson, 45, a training and development co-ordinator
Jenny Esson, 45, a training and development co-ordinator
PA

“Outrageously funny” and “fiercely protective” training and development coordinator Jenny Esson died after testing positive for Covid-19.

The 45-year-old – who was part of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust – died on April 17.

Jenny worked for the trust’s Recovery College, which offers support for people who have had mental or physical health issues.

In a statement, Jenny’s family said she was “at the very heart” of their lives.

“She was charismatic, loving, passionate, outrageously funny and loved to laugh,” they said. “She was fiercely protective of us and always proud to provide for us, look after us.

“She was happiest at home and was passionate and proud of her work.”

Her daughter Kasia said: “Jenny was like a best friend and a mum combined. She was the best person I’ve ever met.”

Meanwhile, trust chief executive Tracy Dowling said Jenny “made a tremendous difference to so many people’s lives”.

“Jenny was one of the first people I met when I joined the trust and I was always struck by her energy, charisma and shining smile.”

Linda Clarke

Linda Clarke
Linda Clarke
WWL

Linda Clarke was a midwife who spent three decades bringing babies into the world. She died on April 17 after testing positive for coronavirus.

“Linda was 66 years old and worked in our maternity service for 30 years, bringing many new lives into our borough and caring for expectant mums,” said Silas Nicholls, chief executive of the Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

“She will be sadly missed by her colleagues and our thoughts and condolences are with her family, friends and loved ones.”

On Facebook, women and families Linda had cared for described her as an “amazing, kind and caring person”.

One wrote: “I was so lucky to have Linda as my midwife; some people just stay with you in your heart, and she certainly did. Her kindness and care were truly exceptional.”

Ruben Munoz

Ruben Munoz – a “highly respected and talented” nursing assistant at the Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust – died on April 17 after testing positive for coronavirus.

Every time Ruben stepped through the hospital’s doors, he showed “enormous dedication to caring for his patients”, said the trust’s chief executive Michael Wilson.

“He was also a much-loved friend to so many people across our hospital and our team are incredibly saddened by his passing.”

Ruben had worked for the trust for almost a decade, having joined in 2011.

In a statement, his family described him as a “good son, a beloved husband and an amazing father to his two children”. “He was so proud of his NHS and Woodland Ward family,” they added.

Khulisani Nkala

Khulisani Nkala
Khulisani Nkala
Supplied

Mental health nurse Khulisani Nkala, 46, died on April 17 after contracting coronavirus.

Dr Sara Munro, chief executive of Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, said: “This is the first member of our particular NHS family to lose their life to Covid-19 and I sincerely hope it will be the last.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with his family at this difficult time. They have asked for their privacy to be respected so they can come to terms with this loss and grieve in peace. We have shared with them how much Khuli meant to so many colleagues and service users at our trust.

“Khuli, who was 46 years old, was a well-respected and selfless professional nurse, who ‘always put the patient first’, and will be greatly missed by his colleagues.”

Kamlesh Masson

Dr Kamlesh Kumar Masson, 78, a GP who worked in the NHS for 47 years, who has died after contracting coronavirus
Dr Kamlesh Kumar Masson, 78, a GP who worked in the NHS for 47 years, who has died after contracting coronavirus
NHS Thurrock CCG/PA Wire

GP Kamlesh Masson – an NHS veteran of almost 50 years – died at University College London Hospital on April 16 after contracting Covid-19.

His death was confirmed by Dr Kallil, the chair of NHS Thurrock CCG, where Kamlesh had been a GP for more than 30 years.

Kamlesh first arrived in the UK in 1973, a statement from the CCG said, having completed his medical training in India and worked as a doctor in east Africa.

He went on to found the Milton Road Surgery in Grays in 1985 and worked there until 2017, when he started to do locum work.

“He was an excellent clinician whose drive to constantly improve his clinical skills and knowledge with passion and enthusiasm will remain with us all as a reminder to always try to be the best,” Kamlesh’s family said.

He was known in the community for being a “dedicated, determined, positive individual who would always do his utmost to help”.

They continued: “His thirst for knowledge was only seconded by his passion for his hobbies including cooking, clay-pigeon shooting and learning new languages.

“Dr Masson was an honest, kind and generous man who was deeply respected by anyone who was privileged to cross paths with him. He was jovial, funny and kind, always wanting to make the best of any situation.”

Dr Kallil added: “We were very sad to hear of the passing of Dr Masson. He was a well respected and liked GP in Thurrock, with a significant contribution over the last 30 years in the borough caring for patients and providing support.”

Gladys Mujajati

Undated handout photo issued by Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust of Gladys Mujajati
Undated handout photo issued by Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust of Gladys Mujajati
PA

Community mental health nurse Gladys Mujajati, 46, died in hospital after contracting Covid-19, the Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust confirmed on April 16.

The 46-year-old from Littleover, who suffered from an underlying health condition, had stepped away from frontline duties in recent weeks, the trust said, adding that colleagues were “devastated by her loss”.

“Gladys had a big heart and colleagues have talked about how she always had a smile on her face,” trust chief executive Ifti Majid said.

“She was known to be a warm and caring individual, always looking out for her patients and colleagues, showing true compassion and empathy.

“It is clear that in Gladys we have lost a fantastic nurse, colleague and friend.

“Our thoughts and condolences are with Gladys’ family, friends and colleagues.”

Meanwhile, Derby North MP Amanda Solloway described Gladys’ death as “absolutely heartbreaking”.

In a tweet, she wrote: “Absolutely heartbreaking to hear about the loss of Gladys Mujajati, one of our precious NHS workers and constituents.

“Gladys, was a well loved and caring colleague at Derby City Community Mental Health Team.

“My thoughts and prayers go out to her family, friends & colleagues.”

Barry England

Barry England, a leading operations manager for the East of England Ambulance Service, died on April 16 after testing positive for Covid-19.

Colleagues in the service described Barry, who worked in Hemel Hempstead, as a “hugely valued friend and colleague”.

Meanwhile, in a statement issued through the ambulance service, Barry’s family said their hearts had been broken by his sudden passing.

“Barry was extremely proud to have worked for the ambulance service for over 33 years,” the statement read. “The family would like to thank all the NHS staff who cared for Barry in hospital and for all the support being received from his former colleagues.”

Lourdes Campbell

Undated handout photo issued by the Bolton NHS Foundation Trust of Lourdes Campbell
Undated handout photo issued by the Bolton NHS Foundation Trust of Lourdes Campbell
PA

The death of Lourdes Campbell, a “dedicated” and “compassionate” health care assistant at Bolton Hospital, was confirmed on April 16.

In a statement, Fiona Noden – chief executive of the Bolton Foundation Trust – said Lourdes had died on the hospital’s critical care unit after contracting Covid-19.

“Lourdes, known as Des to her colleagues, has worked with us for nearly 13 years,” she said, describing her as a “well-liked and valued member of the team” who was known for working “extremely hard”.

“She was dedicated to patient care and her colleagues respected her quiet, diligent and compassionate approach.

“This is a terrible and poignant reminder of the situation we are facing every day to help others and I want to thank every member our staff for their continued care for our patients and community.”

Following her death, Lourdes’ colleagues held a vigil for her outside the hospital, carrying out a minute’s silence before the weekly “clap for carers”.

Greater Manchester mayor Andy Burnham described Lourdes’ death as a “tragedy”.

Julianne Cadby

“Much loved” NHS manager Julianne Cadby died after contracting Covid-19, the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board confirmed on April 16.

At the time of her death, Julianne had worked in child and adolescent mental health for 16 years – but had been part of the health board for more than 30 years, starting out as a medical secretary.

“Julianne was a much loved member of our team – she was extremely warm and caring and would always make time to support her colleagues,” the board said in a statement.

“Her dedication shone through, playing a central role in all that we do in the service, and her focus was always on ensuring we are delivering the best service we can for children and young people.

“Her loss will be felt by all the many colleagues she has worked with over the years.”

Julianne is survived by her husband Chris, their son Evan and her brother Ian.

On Twitter, a colleague wrote: “I am shocked and absolutely gutted. This will hit many people very hard. She was always smiling, constantly kind and warm with a really comforting presence. My thoughts are with her family, friends and much loved colleagues at CAMHS [child and adolescent mental health services].”

Simon Guest

Simon Guest, a radiographer at Furness General Hospital described as a “true hero” by his colleagues, died on April 15 after contracting Covid-19.

In a tribute, his wife Nicky said he was a “true gentleman and a great role model to all”. “He was a gentle soul and so very caring with both his patients and NHS colleagues,” she said.

“Simon worked tirelessly on the front line, always helping others, a dedicated professional in every sense of the word.”

Nicky, who said her husband had a “fantastic” sense of humour, added: “His work ethic and personality were like sunshine and light even in the darkest of times.”

Rose Byron, the lead radiographer at Furness General Hospital, described Simon as a “modest man”, saying he “would be stunned by the outpouring of grief and love being shown for him”.

“He had a great passion for life and enjoyed motorbikes, nice cars, guitars and music,” she said. “Simon will be greatly missed and fondly remembered by all who knew him. He is forever in our hearts… A true hero.”

Aaron Cummins, chief executive of the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, added: “I know how respected Simon was, and how truly missed he will be. We are all devastated by the news, and determined to support Simon’s family and friends and ensure his memory will live on.”

Brian Darlington

Undated handout photo issued by Mid Cheshire Hospitals Foundation Trust of Brian Darlington
Undated handout photo issued by Mid Cheshire Hospitals Foundation Trust of Brian Darlington
PA

Brian Darlington – a porter at Mid Cheshire Hospitals known for “always having a smile on his face” – died from Covid-19 after more than 20 years' service in the NHS.

The trust confirmed on April 15 that he had died at Leighton Hospital after testing positive for coronavirus.

Ava, Brian’s wife of 46 years, described him as a “great husband, father and grandfather”.

“He was dedicated to the trust and as a family we are grateful for and appreciative of all of the kind words and messages we have seen and received,” she said.

Meanwhile, in a tribute to his colleague, facilities supervisor Richard Studinski said: “Nothing was ever too much trouble for Brian – he worked hard and was happy to do whatever was needed of him.

“He always walked round the hospital with a smile on his face, passing out sweets to colleagues he’d meet on the corridor.”

The trust’s chief executive James Sumner added: “Brian had dedicated over 20 years to the trust during his NHS career and will be sadly missed by all who knew and worked with him.

“He was without doubt a treasured member of the team at Mid Cheshire.”

Andrew Treble

Andrew Treble, who had returned to work at Wrexham Maeler Hospital.
Andrew Treble, who had returned to work at Wrexham Maeler Hospital.
Family handout / Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board

Andrew Treble, 57, a theatre assistant at Wrexham Maelor Hospital in North Wales, died on April 15, after testing positive for Covid-19.

Known to his family and colleagues as Andy, he had worked at the hospital for almost 40 years and has been described as a “well-loved colleague and friend to us all.”

Andy’s 17-year-old daughter Emily said: “He was such a lovely man, I’m proud to call him my father. He’s helped me through so much and he has always been there for me.

“He always cheered me up by watching Laurel and Hardy together. He was so kind, so loving and he will be missed forever.”

His sister, Maria Molloy, said Andy had dedicated his life to his work and “always had a smile on his face”. “Andy absolutely loved working at the Maelor, his colleagues were his other family,” she said.

“He had a very kind nature and always put everyone else before himself. He was always laughing and smiling, he was such a good man.”

Andy also leaves behind his three other sisters, Caroline, Pauline and Linda.

David Bevan, theatre manager at the hospital, said Andy’s loss “has left a hole in his theatre family”. “Andy was a hardworking, caring and compassionate member of our team with a wonderful sense of humour that touched us all,” he added.

In a joint statement, Betsi Cadwaladr Health Board’s chief executive Simon Dean and chairman Mark Polin, said: “We offer our deepest condolences to Andy’s family, friends and colleagues at this terribly sad time. Every death from Covid-19 is devastating for loved ones, but when it is a colleague, it is all the more poignant.

“Andy was proud to work for the health service and dedicated his career to caring for others. He had worked at the Maelor for almost 40 years and was well-loved by his colleagues, who describe him as hardworking, caring and compassionate.”

Linnette Cruz

Undated handout photo issued by the Swansea Bay University Health Board of dental nurse Linnette Cruz
Undated handout photo issued by the Swansea Bay University Health Board of dental nurse Linnette Cruz
PA

Linnette Cruz, a “highly committed and caring” dental nurse, died on April 14 after contracting coronavirus.

The 51-year-old, who was senior head nurse at the Brynteg dental practice near Swansea, was being treated in the intensive care unit at Morriston Hospital before she passed away.

She leaves a husband, Jeonardy, a son, Jeonard, a sister, Rose, and her parents.

Linnette trained in the Philippines, before coming to Wales a number of years ago.

Brynteg practice owner Nik Patel said her friends and colleagues were devastated by her death. He said: “She brought love, light and joy to everyone around her and will be sadly missed by all.”

Karl Bishop, dental director for Swansea Bay University Health Board said: “Linnette’s death is deeply upsetting to her family, friends and colleagues and all our thoughts are with them. She was a highly committed and caring dental nurse, respected by her colleagues, patients and the communities in which she worked.

“Any death to Covid-19 is a very sad event, and where it affects a healthcare professional it is particularly upsetting.

“The health board will provide all necessary support to the practice and staff during this difficult time.”

Steven Pearson

Steven Pearson, a nurse who “dedicated his life” to mental health, passed away on April 13.

Known for his “larger than life personality” and his tireless work, Steven had worked for the NHS in the north-east for more than 30 years.

In 2014, he joined the North of Tyne street triage team, where he was “always going out of his way to give the best possible care to those in mental health crisis”, his manager Claire Witten said.

“Our team is a team of nurses and police officers delivering urgent mental health care across the CNTW locality, and Steven became known as a highly respected member of the team with a larger than life personality,” she said. “A committed member of the team, he loved his job and the team, always making us laugh and he was renowned for his wicked sense of humour.”

Claire added: “The team are truly devastated to lose a colleague and a friend. We know our team will never be the same again without him and we will miss him dearly.”

Steven is survived by his wife Anne, and their two daughters, Rebecca, 26 and Bethany, 20.

Bethany told the BBC: “My dad went into the NHS at a very, very young age… He was always a mental health nurse, that was his thing.

“He could tell you the mental health law you like that. You could ask him a question and he just knew it, he had so much knowledge around it. He gave his absolute life for it.”

Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong

GoFundMe

Nurse Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong, who was pregnant, died on April 12, at Luton and Dunstable University Hospital after testing positive for coronavirus.

Her baby was successfully delivered and is doing well, according to the hospital.

Mary had worked as a nurse on a general ward at the hospital.

It is not clear if the baby has tested positive for the disease. Mary’s husband is currently self-isolating and has also been tested for Covid-19.

The Bedfordshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust said that Mary tested positive on April 5 and was admitted to the hospital she worked at on April 7.

David Carter, chief executive of Bedfordshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “Mary worked here for five years and was a highly valued and loved member of our team, a fantastic nurse and a great example of what we stand for in this trust.

“She tested positive for Covid-19 after being tested on April 5 and was admitted to the hospital on April 7.

“Our thoughts and deepest condolences are with Mary’s family and friends at this sad time.”

Colleagues paid tribute to Mary, who also went by her married name of Boateng, on a GoFundMe page set up to help her family financially.

Renai Mcinerney wrote: “Sister Mary was my colleague, I worked alongside her for a few years. She deserves her family to be looked after, after she devoted her life to the NHS as a nurse.

“It’s time to look out/after our own and return the selflessness persona Mary carried and give something so small, but so big to her family in this time of need. RIP sister Mary!”

Caitlin Green posted: “So sorry to Mary’s family and friends for her loss. She will live on in her beautiful baby girl.”

Maureen Ellington

Maureen Ellington, a health care assistant “who was well-loved by every colleague and patient” she worked with, died on April 12 after testing positive for coronavirus.

The mother-of-five had worked in the NHS for the past 25 years, most recently at Southmead Hospital in Bristol. She was in her early sixties when she died, the hospital said.

In a statement, Maureen’s family said they were “heartbroken to lose the pillar of our family”.

“She was simply amazing,” they said. “She loved her husband, five children, six grandchildren, wider family, friends and colleagues. She was kind hearted, bubbly, caring and always joyous.

“She would light up any room she entered. She will always be in our hearts.”

Meanwhile, her manager Suzanne Moss described her as an “irreplaceable” member of the team.

“Maureen was a kind hearted, compassionate and caring person and she brought all these attributes into her ward practice which made her a highly valued member of the team,” Moss said.

“Maureen put the patients and colleagues before herself and always had a smile on her face. She will be greatly missed and forever in our hearts.”

Kevin Smith

Kevin Smith
Kevin Smith
PA

Doncaster Royal Infirmary confirmed the death of plaster technician Kevin Smith on April 12, following a “brief, but courageous, battle with Covid-19”.

He worked at the hospital for more than 35 years, and was “renowned for his warm personality, diligence and compassion”, the trust said.

Richard Parker, chief executive at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals, said: “I am utterly heartbroken to share the news that Kevin Smith, a well-respected and hugely popular member of our team, has sadly passed away following a brief, but courageous, battle with Covid-19.

“A plaster technician at Doncaster Royal Infirmary and a valued member of the team for over 35 years, Kev, as he was known to friends and colleagues, was renowned for his warm personality, diligence and compassion.

“I am incredibly thankful to colleagues who cared for Kevin, and for their tireless efforts during this time.”

Oscar King Jr

Aged 45, Oscar King Jr, a Filipino porter at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, passed away on April 11 from suspected coronavirus.

He was said to have worked for the hospital for more than a decade, “always doing his job with great enthusiasm and joy”.

A GoFundMe page, created by the Jesus is Lord Church Oxford, has already raised more than £12,000 and revealed Oscar’s wife has also recently been taken to hospital with coronavirus symptoms.

It said: “It is with our deepest sorrow that we inform you of the death of our dear brother Oscar King Jr, who tragically passed away due to Covid-19 on April 11, 2020, at the age of 45.

“He was a beloved friend, loving husband, and devoted father to his only daughter, 10-year old Gaby.”

It said Oscar had worked as a porter at the John Radcliffe Hospital for more than 10 years “always doing his job with great enthusiasm and joy”.

The tribute added: “He was a warm soul, full of fun and laughter.”

In a statement, Oxford University Hospitals confirmed that two porters at the John Radcliffe Hospital had died. However, it did not say whether it was related to coronavirus.

Gareth Roberts

Undated handout photo issued by Cardiff & Vale UHB of Welsh NHS worker Gareth Roberts who died after contracting Covid-19.
Undated handout photo issued by Cardiff & Vale UHB of Welsh NHS worker Gareth Roberts who died after contracting Covid-19.
PA

The death of the “extremely popular” nurse Gareth Roberts – who came out of retirement in 2015 having worked since the 1980s – was confirmed by Cardiff and Vale University Health Board on April 11.

In a statement, the health board said he was “extremely popular, fun-filled and well-liked”.

“Staff say he was such a kind and helpful person, and that they learned so much from him. He had a lovely way with relatives and always offered the caring personal side, he was very much an ‘old school’ nurse.”

On social media, a fellow nurse , who described him as a “mentor”, wrote: “I have know Gareth for over 25 years.

“Good memories of his friendship. Gareth was widely respected by his nursing family and contributed so much to our patients.”

The health board said Gareth died at the Prince Charles Hospital in Merthyr Tydfil. He is survived by his wife, son and grandson.

Elbert Rico

Elbert Rico
Elbert Rico
GoFundMe

Elbert Rico , who worked as a porter at John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford since moving to the UK from the Philippines in 2004, died from suspected coronavirus on April 10.

On a GoFundMe page his daughter Carla wrote: “It is with great sadness to announce that my dad Elbert Rico has passed away today April 10, 2020 with suspected Covid-19.

“We are asking our dear friends and family to help us during this difficult time to help raise money for any funeral and further expenses that we may need.”

She said he was a “loving husband, father and friend” who was mainly known by Rico in his workplace and with close friends.

She added: “He has been working as a porter in JR Hospital since he came to the UK in 2004 and loved the work that he did.

“He was always hard working and would prioritise other’s needs firsts.

“He would walk around the hospital with a smile on his face and very rarely would he call in sick from work.”

In a statement, Oxford University Hospitals confirmed that two porters at the John Radcliffe Hospital had died. However, it did not say whether it was related to coronavirus.

Donna Campbell

Described by colleagues as “beautiful and kind-hearted”, healthcare support worker Donna Campbell from the Velindre Cancer Centre in Cardiff passed away at the University Hospital of Wales on April 10.

The NHS trust said staff at the hospital were “completely heartbroken”.

Steve Ham, the chief executive of the trust, said she “would always be remembered” at the hospital.

He said: “We are devastated to have lost a member of the Velindre family.

“We will always remember her as a dedicated, hard-working member of our nursing team who was proud to work for the NHS.”

A tribute from the trust said Donna’s “warm and genuine nature” comforted people in difficult times.

It added: “She was without doubt a treasured member of our work family who could light up a room with her infectious laugh and bubbly personality, but at the same time she had the most wonderful ability to comfort and care for people.”

Sara Trollope

Sara Trollope, a 51-year-old matron for older adult mental health services in Hillingdon, west London, died at Watford General hospital on April 10.

The Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust confirmed to the PA news agency she died after testing positive for coronavirus.

In a statement, the trust said Sara “worked tirelessly with dedication, commitment and passion” for patients in a “long and successful” career.

“Sara’s husband Gary spoke of her devotion to her family. She will be dearly missed by Gary, daughters Gemma and Freya and her twin sons Kyle and Michael.”

Meanwhile, Dr Paul Hopper said she had “that unbeatable combination of kindness, selflessness and total determination to get things right for patients”.

A crowd funder set up on Saturday by her friends Tracy Woods and Marie Wright to help her family.

They wrote: “This wonderful woman only ever wanted to become a nurse, she fulfilled this desire and worked hard... Sadly it was this job that cost her, her life.

“She fought this bravely for 7 days until it became too much for her and she passed peacefully.”

Julie Omar

“Much-loved” and “dedicated” nurse Julie Omar died on April 10 while self-isolating at home with coronavirus symptoms.

Julie Omar was a highly experienced trauma and orthopaedics nurse who had most recently been working as a sister on Ward 14 at Redditch’s Alexandra Hospital, the Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said.

In a message to colleagues, Trust chief executive Matthew Hopkins said the 52-year-old would be known to many staff at its Worcester site from her time with the trauma team there.

Hopkins’ message read: “It is with great sorrow that I have to share with you the sad news that a much-loved member of our nursing team – Julie Omar – has died.

“Julie, who was just 52, had been self-isolating at home after developing symptoms of Covid-19, but sadly her condition deteriorated and she died at home yesterday (Friday) morning.

“She leaves a husband and a grown-up daughter.

“We have been asked by her family not to share any more details at this stage and we will of course respect those wishes.”

Andy Costa

Andy Costa, one of the longest-serving members of staff at a mental health centre in London, died on 9 April.

Costa devoted 26 years to the NHS, most recently working as a ward administrator at Highgate Mental Health Centre in north London.

The NHS trust paid tribute to his “diligence and loyalty”.

A spokeswoman for the trust said: “Andy was a highly respected, conscientious and long-serving colleague who had worked at Highgate Mental Health Centre since it opened 15 years ago.”

Prior to that, Costa had worked on Elizabeth Torrance Ward in the nearby Waterlow Unit.

The spokeswoman added: “Andy’s 26 years of diligence and loyalty to Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust were honoured with a long service award only last summer at a special tea party at the Irish Centre in Camden.

“Andy will be very much missed by us all, especially by his many colleagues and friends in the ward, administration and domestic staff areas at Highgate Mental Health Centre.

“Our deepest sympathies go to his family and friends.”

Joanna Klenczon

Joanna Klenczon
Joanna Klenczon
Northampton General Hospital

Joanna Klenczon, 34, worked at the Northampton General Hospital (NGH) for 10 years before her death on April 9.

Paying tribute to her, a spokesperson for the NGH NHS trust said she was “well-liked and respected by everyone she worked with”.

The spokesperson said Klenczon died after “receiving the best care we could provide”.

In a statement, the trust said: “Joanna had worked at NGH for the past 10 years and her colleagues remember her as someone who was courteous, polite, a good organiser and team member who set high standards, and was prepared to go the extra mile.

“Joanna was well liked and respected by everyone she worked with.

“Our thoughts are with Joanna’s family at this time and we offer them our sincere condolences.”

Trust chief exec Dr Sonia Swart added: “Joanna touched the lives of so many people at NGH and she will be missed by everyone who knew or worked with her.”

Abdul Mabud Chowdhury

Abdul Mabud Chowdhury
Abdul Mabud Chowdhury
Facebook

Abdul Mabud Chowdhury died from Covid-19 on 9 April, days after warning the government about a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) for NHS staff.

Abdul – a consultant urologist at Homerton hospital in Hackney east London – died after spending 15 days in Queens hospital, Romford.

Paying tribute to the doctor, his son Intisar said he wanted his father to be remembered as a “kind and compassionate hero”.

“I want everyone to remember him for the kind and compassionate hero he was, because he was a hero,” he told BBC Radio 4.

“I want him to be remembered as a hero, he genuinely is a hero.

“He started a conversation that I hope does not end for a while – does not end ever.”

Abdul, who was born in Bangladesh, was 53 years old and had no underlying health conditions.

On Twitter, the Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust wrote: “We are so sad to have lost a valued and popular colleague.

“Mr Chowdhury was one of our urological surgeons and was a familiar face in outpatients and other departments. He will be missed. Our thoughts and condolences are with his family.”

Edmond Adedeji

Dr Edmond Adedeji worked as a locum registrar in the emergency department of Great Western Hospital in Swindon, Wiltshire.

The 62-year-old, described as a “respected and well-liked member of the team”, died on April 8.

He had been receiving treatment in the hospital’s intensive care unit and tested positive for coronavirus.

In a statement, his family said: “We as a family are grateful to God for the life of Dr Edmond Adefolu Adedeji.

“He died doing a job he loved, serving others before himself.

“We would like to thank the staff and his colleagues for looking after him during his final days.

“He leaves behind a wife, three children and three grandchildren.”

Kevin McNamara, chief executive of Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, described Dr Adedeji as “a member of our GWH family”.

“Dr Adedeji had worked with us as a locum registrar in the emergency department since August 2019 and was a respected and well-liked member of the team,” he said.

“His family have been informed and we ask that their privacy is respected at this extremely difficult time.

“On behalf of the whole trust, I would like to extend our sincere condolences to Edmond’s family.

“Our thoughts are with them, and his friends and colleagues at the trust.”

Alice Kit Tak Ong

Alice Kit Tak Ong holding her daughter Melissa as a baby.
Alice Kit Tak Ong holding her daughter Melissa as a baby.
PA/Courtesy of Melissa Ong

Alice Kit Tak Ong – a “beloved” and “highly-experienced” nurse – died on April 7 after contracting coronavirus.

Her daughter Melissa told the Guardian that the 70-year-old had worked for the NHS for the past 44 years, having arrived in the UK from Hong Kong in the 1970s.

She told the paper that her mother was “completely dedicated to her work”.

“That’s what she was doing until the moment she was taken ill,” she said. “She loved her job and she loved her patients.”

The Greenfield Medical Centre – where Kit had worked for the past 20 years – released a tribute calling her a “loyal, committed and highly experienced nurse who brought experience and skill to all areas of her work”.

“She was not only caring but had a great sense of humour and was much loved by everyone here at Greenfield,” the statement read. “She will be hugely missed by her colleagues and patients alike.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to Kit’s family at this very sad time, to her colleagues and friends, and to the many patients that she devoted her time and care to over the years.”

Barbara Moore

Undated family handout photo issued by Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust of Barbara Moore
Undated family handout photo issued by Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust of Barbara Moore
PA

Barbara Moore, an “unsung hero” who worked at Liverpool’s Aintree University Hospital, died on April 6 after testing positive for Covid-19.

The 54-year-old – who was a patient discharge planner – joined the hospital after spending much of her career as a carer for disabled people.

A spokesperson for Barbara’s family described her a “much-loved wife, mum, nan, sister, auntie, friend and beautiful person”.

“Barbara dedicated her life to caring for others and doted on her two beautiful children and grandchildren,” they said.

“She loved nothing more than spending precious time with her family. Barbara will be sadly missed by so many.”

Dianne Brown, chief nurse at Aintree Hospital, described Barbara’s death as an “awful blow to us all”.

“She will be missed so much by all of her colleagues,” she said. “Many people don’t think about the work of patient discharge planners when they think of a hospital.

“But Barbara’s dedication to helping patients get safely out of hospital meant that people returned to their loved ones as soon and as simply as possible. She will be terribly missed.”

Jitendra Rathod

Jitendra Rathod
Jitendra Rathod
Cardiff and Vale University Health Board

“Exemplary” heart surgeon and father-of-two Jitendra Rathod died in intensive care on April 6.

Colleagues at the University Hospital of Wales where he worked – and passed away – described him as “an incredibly dedicated surgeon who cared deeply for his patients”.

“He was well-liked and greatly respected by one and all,” a statement from the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board read.

“He was a very compassionate and wonderful human being.”

It added: “We will miss him greatly.”

Jitendra had worked in the hospital’s cardio-thoracic surgery department since the mid-1990s, returning in 2006 after a brief stint abroad, the board said.

Janice Graham

Janice Graham, a 58-year-old health care support worker and district nurse from Scotland, died on April 6 after contracting coronavirus.

Her death from Covid-19 was confirmed by the Inverclyde Health and Social Care Partnership,

Her son Craig told STV News he would “miss everything about her”.

“My mum was there for me no matter what. I will miss everything about her,” he said. “I am so proud of her and there will not be a day that goes by that I will not think about her.”

On social media, friends and colleagues described Janice as one of the most “kind, caring and compassionate” people they knew, with one writing: “She will never be forgotten and Inverclyde Royal Hospital has lost one of their finest.”

Glen Corbin

The death of Glen Corbin – a 59-year-old health care assistant from Brent – was confirmed on April 4.

A “much-loved colleague”, Glen worked on the Pine Ward at the Park Royal Centre for Mental Health in north west London for a number of years after joining the team in 1995.

“He was the ‘go to’ person who knew everything about the ward and how to get things done,” the Central and North West London NHS Trust said in a statement, describing him as “the backbone of the team and ward”.

“He was instrumental in helping turn things around and supporting the senior management team at the time. It is no secret he hated paperwork and the thing he valued most was being and working with service users.”

The statement added: “Glen was a much loved colleague and will be sorely missed.”

Despite having previously retired, Glen had returned as a bank healthcare assistant before his death.

Claire Murdoch, leader of the trust where Glen had worked, confirmed he had died after contracting coronavirus.

Calling him a “great health care assistant”, she wrote on Twitter: “We are all so sad and the poorer at his passing”.

Anton Sebastianpillai

Undated family handout photo of consultant geriatrician Anton Sebastianpillai, the doctor who specialised in treating the elderly has died after testing positive for Covid-19.
Undated family handout photo of consultant geriatrician Anton Sebastianpillai, the doctor who specialised in treating the elderly has died after testing positive for Covid-19.
PA

Anton Sebastianpillai – a doctor who specialised in treating the elderly – died on April 4.

The “hugely respected” consultant died at Kingston Hospital in south-west London, where he also worked, four days after he was admitted to the hospital’s intensive care unit.

Anton – who qualified as a doctor in Sri Lanka in 1967 – completed his last shift on March 20.

Lib Dem MP Ed Davey called news of the doctor’s passing “extremely sad”, adding that he had “retired and returned to serve”.

He wrote on Twitter: “My thoughts are with Dr Sebastianpillai’s wife and son. I was privileged to meet him and discuss the NHS and Tamil history.

“Anton is hugely respected as a consultant and author: his illustrated history of Sri Lanka is world class.”

In a statement, a spokesperson for Kingston Hospital NHS Trust said: “It is with great sadness that I confirm the death of a consultant geriatrician who was part of the team at Kingston Hospital.

“Dr Anton Sebastianpillai died on Saturday 4 April 2020 having been cared for in the hospital’s intensive care unit since 31 March.”

They added: “Dr Sebastianpillai completed his last shift with us on 20 March and we would like to extend our sincere condolences to his family.”

Liz Glanister

Liverpool nurse Liz Glanister – described by the city’s mayor as a “hero in every sense of the word” – died on April 3.

The 68-year-old, who was a long-standing staff nurse at Aintree University Hospital, died at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital after testing positive for Covid-19.

Liverpool mayor Joe Anderson said: “Words cannot express how much a debt of gratitude this city owes to Liz Glanister and her colleagues.

“Liz was a long-serving member of hospital staff who dedicated her life to caring for others and in the true spirt of this city she gave everything she had to make a difference at such a crucial time.

“She was a hero in every sense of the word.”

In her memory, flags at Liverpool Town Hall, St George’s Hall and The Cunard Building were lowered to half-mast on Monday.

All three will be be lit up blue as a tribute to Liz and her NHS colleagues for the foreseeable future, the mayor added.

Dianne Brown, the chief nurse at the Liverpool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust: “All our thoughts are with Liz’s family at this time and we offer them our sincere condolences.

“Liz will be sadly missed by all those who knew and worked with her.”

Areema Nasreen

The mother-of-three was being treated at Walsall Manor Hospital, where she worked, at the time of her death.

Richard Beeken, chief exec of Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, said Areema’s vocation in nursing “was clear for all to see”.

Areema had started work at the trust in 2003 as a housekeeper, before gaining her nursing qualification in January 2019.

“She always said that she was so blessed to have the role of a nurse which she absolutely loved because she wanted to feel like ‘she could make a difference’ – and you did, Areema,” Beeken said. “You will be very sadly missed.”

Areema’s fellow nurse Rubi Akhtar paid tribute to her online, describing her as “the most loveliest, genuine person you could ever meet”.

“She went above and beyond for everyone she met,” she wrote. “I’m so grateful that I had the honour to call her my best friend, she saw me at my best and my worst and accepted my every flaw. I am so broken that words can’t explain.”

She added: “I love you so much and I will never forget you. You had so much to live for, I am sorry you didn’t get to see your kids grow up and I’m sorry that you didn’t get to complete your career.”

Aimee O’Rourke

Aimee O'Rourke, a 39-year-old nurse from Kent, died on April 2
Aimee O'Rourke, a 39-year-old nurse from Kent, died on April 2
GoFundMe

The mum-of-three passed away at the Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Hospital in Margate, where she worked.

The 39-year-old had joined the hospital’s acute medical unit as a newly-qualified nurse in 2017.

On Facebook, her daughter Megan Murphy wrote: “Look at the lives you looked after and all the families you comforted when patients passed away.

“You are an angel and you will wear your NHS crown forever more...”

Ward manager Julie Gammon – who sat with Aimee when she was admitted – said the whole team had been devastated by her death.

“She was such a kind and caring nurse, and she had a really special relationship with her patients and colleagues,” Gammon said.

Meanwhile Susan Acott, chief executive of East Kent Hospitals, described Aimee as “hard-working, dedicated and hugely popular with staff and patients alike”.

“She gave her all to care for our patients and her commitment was evident for all to see.”

Lynsay Coventry

“Loving, wonderful and caring” midwife Lynsay Coventry died on April 2 after testing positive for Covid-19.

The 54-year-old had been a midwife at the Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust for a decade.

She is understood to be the first serving midwife in England whose death following a coronavirus diagnosis was confirmed by the NHS. She died at the Mid Essex Hospital Services NHS Trust.

In a statement, her family said: “Our hearts are broken at the loss of our loving, wonderful and caring mum, sister, daughter and grandmother.

“We each know how much she loved and cherished us. Her love for us all was unfailing and her strength in the way she cared and supported us will fill our memories.

“What we also know is how proud she was to be an NHS midwife. Lynsay followed her dream and trained as a midwife later in life.”

She was a “well-respected” midwife who supported hundreds of women as they gave birth, they added.

Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent, chief midwifery officer for England, said: “Lynsay was clearly a highly regarded midwife whose dedication to women, babies and their families will be remembered and cherished by her own family and her colleagues.

“My deepest thoughts are with them, her children, grandchildren, parents and siblings. ”

Laura Tanner

Laura Tanner
Laura Tanner
PA

Laura Tanner, a “fantastic” mother-of-two who had worked for the NHS for more than a decade, died on April 1.

The 51-year-old was a locality administrator for Basildon and Brentwood Clinical Commissioning Group.

Her husband Kevin described her as “very loving” and caring.

“She was a great mother to her children, she loved them dearly,” he said. “She was friendly to everyone.

“All these different stories from her work friends have been coming through to me. It’s just heartbreaking. She really was loved.”

Laura had a “wicked sense of humour”, he added. “She was a kind soul.”

In a statement, director of strategy at Basildon and Brentwood CCG William Guy said Laura’s death would leave a “massive void” in the organisation.

“With her warmth and sense of humour, she was a popular colleague,” he said. “We offer our most sincere condolences to Laura’s family.”

Dr Alfa Saadu

Dr Alfa Saadu died on March 31 after contracting coronavirus
Dr Alfa Saadu died on March 31 after contracting coronavirus
Dr Alfa Saadu

The 68-year-old, who migrated to the UK from Nigeria, had been ill with Covid-19 for two weeks before his death, his family said.

Alfa had returned to clinical work after stepping down as medical director of the Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust in 2016.

“He was a very passionate man, who cared about saving people,” his son Dani said.

“As soon you spoke to him about medicine his face would light up. He worked for the NHS for nearly 40 years in different hospitals across London.”

He added: “He loved to lecture people in the world of medicine – he did so in the UK and Africa. My dad retired and was working part time at the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital in Welwyn, Hertfordshire, until his passing.

“He was a massive family man and we did everything together. Family came first.

“He left two sons and a wife, who is a retired doctor herself in occupational health.”

Lance McCarthy, chief executive of The Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, said: “Alfa was well-known at the trust for his passion for ensuring our patients received high quality care. He was a committed member of the team and is remembered fondly by many.

“His family and friends are in our thoughts at this sad time.”

John Doyle

John Doyle, the first male telephonist to work at New Cross Hospital in Wolverhampton, died on March 30 after contracting Covid-19.

The 60-year-old suffered from respiratory problems. He is survived by Kate, his wife of 34 years, his daughter Amy and three grandchildren.

Amy said: “My dad was a truly wonderful man who we all miss dearly. The loss is immeasurable but so is the love left behind.”

Meanwhile, John’s colleague Sam Smith described him as a “very kind, genuine and hard-working member of staff”.

“We will greatly miss his presence in the switchboard,” he added.

Before working at New Cross Hospital, John was a CCTV operator for West Midlands Police for 26 years.

His sergeant Steve Townsend said: “The fact that, on leaving the police family, he continued to try to help others by joining the NHS at New Cross tells you all you need to know about what drove this man – his desire to help others.

“John was a kind, friendly, quietly-spoken gentleman with a wicked sense of humour who was always willing to go above and beyond his remit to help anyone who asked.

“It is testament to his friendliness and popularity that news of his sad passing was devastating to those who knew him. ”

The police force has now named one of its German Shepherd puppies after John as a tribute.

Thomas Harvey

Healthcare assistant Thomas Harvey died on March 29
Healthcare assistant Thomas Harvey died on March 29
PA

Healthcare assistant Thomas Harvey – a father of seven – died at home on March 29 after contracting coronavirus.

The 57-year-old had worked at Goodmayes Hospital in Ilford, east London.

Professor Oliver Shanley, chief executive of the North East London Foundation Trust, described Thomas’ death as “a huge loss” for the trust and the NHS.

“Thomas was a longstanding, dedicated member of our intermediate care team. This is a huge loss to both NELFT and the wider NHS,” he said.

However, Thomas’ family have criticised the NHS for the lack of personal protective equipment given to staff before his death, saying he had only been given an apron and gloves.

His daughter Tamira told the BBC: “It’s so sad. I feel like he was let down in so many ways.

“It’s an absolute tragedy and he didn’t deserve to lose his life in the way he did.

“If he had just had the right equipment we wouldn’t be in this predicament and it wouldn’t have escalated in the way it did.”

In a statement to the BBC, Goodmayes Hospital said it was following national PPE guidance, while the department of health said it was working “around the clock” to make sure workers on the frontline had the equipment they need.

Amged El-Hawrani

Hospital consultant Amged El-Hawrani died on March 28 after testing positive for coronavirus
Hospital consultant Amged El-Hawrani died on March 28 after testing positive for coronavirus
PA

Amged El-Hawrani, a hospital consultant known for his “dedication and commitment to his patients”, died at Glenfield Hospital in Leicester on March 28.

He was an ear, nose and throat specialist at the University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Trust, where colleagues described him as a “valued and much loved colleague”.

His fellow NHS staff have since held a minute’s silence to remember him, while one cycled 250 miles on an exercise bike in Amged’s name to raise money to support the trust’s staff during the pandemic.

In a statement, a spokesperson for Amged’s family said he “always put everyone else before himself”.

“We all turned to him when we needed support and he was always there for us. He had so many responsibilities and yet he never complained,” they said.

“Losing Amged is devastating for our family. Life without him is impossible to imagine but together, we will do all we can to honour his memory and live how he would have wanted us to.”

Amged’s son Ashraf added: “He did not seek the praise and approval of others, he was satisfied by viewing the positive effects of his actions and the wellbeing of his family.

“I am incredibly proud to say that for 18 years of my life, Amged El-Hawrani was my father.”

Dr Habib Zaidi

Dr Habib Zaidi, 76, a GP in Leigh-on-Sea for more than 47 years, who died in intensive care at Southend Hospital, Essex, on March 25.
Dr Habib Zaidi, 76, a GP in Leigh-on-Sea for more than 47 years, who died in intensive care at Southend Hospital, Essex, on March 25.
PA

Dr Habib Zaidi – a GP in Leigh-on-Sea for more than 47 years – died in intensive care on March 25.

His death came the day after he was admitted to Southend Hospital in Essex with worsening coronavirus symptoms.

Habib’s family later confirmed he had tested positive for Covid-19.

Dr Jose Garcia-Lobera – GP chair of NHS Southend CCG – called him a “hugely respected, selfless man who dedicated his life to helping others”.

“Dr Zaidi will always be remembered for his significant contribution to local health services through his long career as a GP,” he said. “His loss is deeply felt by his staff, fellow clinicians and the wider community.”

Garcia-Lobera added: “Our thoughts are with his family, who we hope, in time, can take comfort from the incredible legacy he has left behind.”.

Adil El Tayar

Adil El Tayar, a renowned transplant surgeon, died at West Middlesex University Hospital in west London on March 25.

The 63-year-old worked in the NHS for 11 years, before moving to his home country of Sudan to establish a transplant service.

Adil returned to the UK in 2015, working as a locum surgeon before his death.

“Adil was someone who was central to our family, who was well-respected by so many people,” he said.

“Since his death on Wednesday I have had hundreds of text messages from his colleagues and friends. He will be sorely missed.”

Meanwhile, fellow transplant surgeon Dr Abbas Ghazanfar wrote a tribute to Adil, describing him as a “a very hard-working and dedicated surgeon who gave the precious gift of life to so many people around the world by his excellent transplanting skills”.

“He was an excellent colleague, a truly humble soul and above all a noble human being… His sudden departure has shocked his family and friends.

“He will be remembered by many of his colleagues and patients who knew him as the good person and doctor he was. He will be dearly missed by us all.”

The NHS has yet to confirm that Adil tested positive for coronavirus.

If a healthcare worker has died from coronavirus but has not yet been included in this article, it could be because the NHS has yet to confirm they had contracted Covid-19.