POLITICS
01/09/2020 15:09 BST | Updated 01/09/2020 15:16 BST

Nicola Sturgeon Announces Second Scottish Independence Referendum Draft Legislation

First minister says draft bill will set out the timing, terms and question for any vote.

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Nicola Sturgeon has announced a draft bill will be drawn up setting out the timing, terms and question for a new Scottish independence referendum.

The first minister said that Brexit strengthened the case for Scotland to become an independent country.

Unveiling the Programme for government, Sturgeon said that a similar announcement in an independent Scotland would outline plans for an extension to the furlough scheme, more money in borrowing, a more progressive immigration system and a universal basic income.

She told MSPs that a new draft Bill will be drawn up setting out the timing and terms for a new independence referendum, as well as the question to be asked to voters if it is given the green light by Westminster.

The first minister added: “Then, at next year’s election, we will make the case for Scotland to become an independent country and seek a clear endorsement of Scotland’s right to choose our own future.”

Scottish Conservative leader Douglas Ross tweeted: “The first minister just doesn’t get it. We need to take Scotland forward and recover from this crisis together, not go back to the divisions of the past.”

Earlier this month a poll suggested support for Scottish independence has reached a record high of 55%.

The research by Panelbase found the results of the 2014 independence referendum – when 55% of Scots voted to stay in the United Kingdom – were reversed.

Pro-independence organisation Business for Scotland commissioned the poll, with chief executive Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp hailing the results as a “huge landmark” showing the “writing is very definitely on the wall for the union”.

Panelbase questioned a total of 1,011 people across Scotland between August 12 and 18 for the research.

Overall, 51% of those questioned said they support independence, 42% said they would vote to stay in the UK and 7% of voters were undecided.

When undecided voters were excluded, 55% favoured Scotland leaving the UK, with 45% preferring to stay in the union.