The Blog

A Day to Remember

Life is about memories. I've got a career where I've got loads of memories. But even just an ordinary man in the street, like my brother David, he's got his memories as well. And not to be able to think about them, remember them, that must be awful. That must be terrible.

Oh, the wonderful World Cup in '66, it was absolutely fantastic. The biggest memory was on that bus when we were driving away from Wembley and the crowd was going absolutely berserk. It was incredible! They were at every cross roads we came to, at the traffic lights there were swarms of people.

There is one thing that I will never forget... the bus had a sliding window which the driver had open. We drove around a corner and a guy started running after the bus and he jumped up at the window, lifted himself up and put his head through the window and shouted, "well done you lads!" and then he let go and he bounced back down on the road. We were laughing and pointing. "Look at him!" We were killing ourselves laughing, it was so funny, I'll never forget that one; it was great!

Life is about memories. I've got a career where I've got loads of memories. But even just an ordinary man in the street, like my brother David, he's got his memories as well. And not to be able to think about them, remember them, that must be awful. That must be terrible.

My brother, he was a real family man, loved his wife, everything was going great for him, [until he became ill]. You'd be sitting in the lounge, talking to him and we would ask him a question and he would just go blank. He wouldn't answer it. That was the early stages, later we found out it was because he couldn't remember what we were discussing. Then it just got gradually worse. We never discussed why he was losing his memory.

Don't get me wrong, I'm at that age now. When you talk to people my age we do have a bit of memory loss. But if I started to get like our David, something more serious, I would get myself to a doctor very quickly and ask if is there something they can do. People have to be aware that if they are feeling something isn't right they need to see their GP, if not, it will just get worse and worse.

More and more people are getting this condition. And the quicker they do something about it the better.

Interview originally recorded for the Department of Health's 'A Day To Remember' film. Gordon Banks supports A Day To Remember to help increase early diagnosis of dementia across England. For more information about dementia and how to spot the signs visit www.nhs.uk/dementia