100 days of dave

The first 100 days of the new government have seen a number of significant reports and announcements about mental health services and the lives of people with mental health conditions. They include some very promising signs of continued commitment to improving mental health but also some major strains on the system that needs to be addressed.
After "one hundred days of Dave," the government has already served up some good policies for entrepreneurs. But our position as one of the best countries to start and grow a business is not inevitable, and it is relative. Talent is increasingly mobile: if entrepreneurs can build a bigger, better business elsewhere, they probably will.
As things stand, core national funding for arts and culture has already reduced by over £100million (more than a third) since 2009. On top of that, Local Authorities - historically a significant funder of arts and culture outside London - have seen 40% cuts. Local Government Association modeling predicts funding for non-statutory services (like culture) will be down by 66% by the end of the decade.
By continuing to allocate huge fishing quota to industrial boats, while leaving only the crumbs for our low-impact fleet, the UK government is continuing a business-as-usual approach which will do nothing to safeguard either fish stocks or the livelihoods of fishermen in the UK. The last 100 days have shown us that the Conservative government is missing a trick.
We want to see the Government take a more holistic view to prevent people becoming unwell in the first place and support people to make ends meet when they're not currently able to work. Mental health is a key issue for all politicians. With the comprehensive spending review approaching, now's the time to give mental health the investment it deserves.
I'm proud of what we've achieved over the past 100 days, building on major reforms to improve child protection and support for children in care. But this is no time to rest on our laurels - it's very much a beginning. After all, this isn't just about the changes we can make in a given number of days, it's about making changes that will have a positive effect for years to come...
After the general election, it was announced that the trans-Pennine high speed rail route would be paused. This delays, perhaps indefinitely, the creation of the Northern Powerhouse. Such an announcement, within weeks of a Queen's speech in which the Powerhouse received some prominence, is, at best, unfortunate.
We're 100 days into a Tory government and, let's be honest, they have been fairly clear on what they're about. Unfortunately, for the majority of us across the UK - those of us who didn't vote Tory - it doesn't look pretty. A clear course has been set that puts the interests of the haves over the have nots, dismisses issues like the environment and migration as someone else's problem and enthusiastically paints the UK as an increasingly insular, ungenerous country ill-fit and unwilling to play its part in Europe. The penny is well and truly dropping on how hard Lib Dems fought in government - and how much of a difference we actually made over the last five years.
British politics is shifting and realigning, the shift being part of something far bigger than just UK politics, and such
By providing secure homes for all we build a foundation on which anyone and everyone can build a better life for themselves. To hark back to Mr Cameron's comments that I referenced at the start, I can think of no better 'one nation' goal than that.