16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence

But we have come too far to go backwards. We have woken to the notion that consent and respect must be entrenched in the way we treat both girls and boys from the very beginnings. And whether it is in media, in schools, in our homes, or on the streets, we must all speak out loudly against the small, 'harmless' transgressions that ultimately put women at risk. We must not return to slumber.
The current economic system is failing the women who need support the most. Until we change the economic system to serve their needs, we will only be playing catch up trying to end violence against women in our societies.
I believe in the profound strength and wisdom of the women and girls, men and boys around the world who are leading this charge. They work tirelessly to challenge the harmful norms and beliefs that drive violence; to respond with compassion and care to survivors; and hold perpetrators to account.
I want to raise awareness and show my support to all victims, and get the world having the conversation that violence and abuse is never ok and there is support out there. Together we can make a change.
When a charity video starts to go viral you know something is up. As part of its contribution to the 16 Days of Activism
I was half way across the world from my family in the Philippines when Typhoon Haiyan wreaked havoc two years ago. As a Filipina citizen it was hard to see the footage; to hear my family talk about the devastation and the people they couldn't get in touch with. In some ways it was even harder knowing what was going to happen next.
Let's stop pretending that fatal male violence against women are isolated events; or that fatal male violence is somehow distinct from non-fatal male violence. If we truly want to eliminate male violence against women and children, then we need to start contextualising male violence within a culture that classes women as sub-human.