Action Aid

From the Bristol judge to Belfast, Ghana, America and India, outdated laws and deep-rooted sexist attitudes tip the scales in favour of abusers
It is vital the UK remains an international leader in promoting the rights of women and girls. Progress has been made but political and religious fundamentalisms remain widespread. Penny Mordaunt must make the most of and continue to build DFID's expertise and positive reputation on gender issues as she starts her vital new role.
A group of acid attack survivors have sent the world a powerful message about redefining beauty by starring in a catwalk
I saw first-hand how years of civil war followed by the Ebola epidemic had left its mark. So three weeks ago, when I learned that a landslide had hit the country's capital, Freetown, and surrounding areas, I was beyond heartbroken. How much suffering and hardship can the people of Sierra Leone experience in one lifetime?
The situation is horrific but not without hope. Grassroots women's rights organisations are the key to tackling this. ActionAid has worked with them in the past to monitor the use and sale of acid, improve laws to make it harder for perpetrators to escape punishment and change the mindsets of people who see this form of violence as an easy way to settle disputes, for example.
As well as providing free sanitary pads and safe spaces in schools, for example, ActionAid is collaborating with local communities to improve access to toilets and showers and provide safe environments where girls can ask questions about periods, sex and pregnancy.
As we prepare to celebrate all things fatherly this Sunday, here's a look at three dads in rural Kenya who are standing up and speaking out to stop FGM and early marriage. Not only are they keeping their own daughters safe, they are setting an example to help protect future generations of young girls.
Restricting information and access to contraception and abortions, particularly for adolescent girls and already marginalised women, denies them control over their bodies. This undermines women's health and impacts women's ability to access education, work, and ability to participate in all areas of economic, political and social life.
Across East Africa more than 18million people are facing catastrophic drought and food shortages. Already in Somalia people have died because of hunger and as the drought deepens people are becoming weaker and exhausting all their coping mechanisms to keep themselves and their families alive.
Drought in Somaliland, a region of Somalia where ActionAid works Six years ago famine gripped Somalia. The famine came as
To eradicate FGM and other harmful traditional practices we will have to be able to provide and access comprehensive sexuality education, interventions which are among the primary targets of what the Trump administration is proposing.
For generations women's rights campaigners have been working to create a world where there is greater gender equity and parity
Millions of girls around the world live and work on the streets as a direct result of poverty. They are surviving with next to nothing, denied their basic rights, vulnerable, scared and alone. Many, having left home to escape abuse, are also now at greater risk of sexual abuse, sex trafficking and prostitution. Marginalised within society, they are invisible and amongst the hardest to reach and protect.
When the hurricane struck, communities banded together to ensure the most vulnerable - children and the elderly - were carried to safety. Once in temporary shelters it was women who mobilised to pool resources and ensure everyone was fed. They also made sure that teenage girls and single women slept away from the men, to ensure their safety.
As thousands of refugees continue to flee war zones and persecution in search of safety in Europe, and the EU debates how to deal with the worst refugee crisis since the second world war, it's the voices of refugees themselves that have been absent.
On International Safe Cities for Women Day, ActionAid is calling on the UK government to fund the life changing work of women's rights organisations in developing countries, so that no woman or girl has to live in fear of violence in her city.
Nimah's family has lost 25 of their 35 sheep to the drought. If the remaining sheep are lost it could tip the family into destitution. Without livestock they will have nothing to eat or trade with. This prospect makes Nimah fear for her younger siblings.
My wife was at our home, preparing lunch with our boys. When I saw the houses collapsing in the village, I ran as fast as I could through the debris, and back to my family. As I ran, the ground was shaking and I kept falling down. For those five minutes between the earthquake and reaching home, I still had hope. That hope was taken away when I pulled the bodies of my two sons from the rubble.
The Global Goals could be the catalyst for global change but the battle for transformative progress on ending poverty and inequality and the fight for gender equality does not end with these commitments - in many ways we are still at the beginning.